Miss ORSOLYA CZÉRE

Miss ORSOLYA CZÉRE
BA, MA, MSc

Research PG

Overview
Miss ORSOLYA CZÉRE
Miss ORSOLYA CZÉRE

Contact Details

Telephone
work +44 (0)1224 272363
Email
Address
The University of Aberdeen  
Department of Archaeology, School of Geosciences
University of Aberdeen
Room B09, St. Mary's
Elphinstone Rd
Aberdeen
AB24 3UF

Biography

Please note that Orsolya is currently taking a break from her doctoral research to be a Teaching Fellow at the Department of Archaeology at the University of Aberdeen:
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/geosciences/people/profiles/orsolya.czere2

Originally from Slovakia, Orsolya obtained her BA in 2011, from the Comenius University in Bratislava in Systematic biology and ecology. Here, she developed a particular interest in the human past while writing her dissertation on European Ossuaries at the Department of Physical Anthropology.

She then moved to Scotland and acquired her MA (first class honours) at the University of Aberdeen in Archaeology. Her undergraduate research utilised multi-isotope approaches, focusing on the reconstruction of both dietary habits (δ13C, δ15N, δ 34S) and mobility patterns (87Sr/86Sr, δ 18O) amongst individuals buried in a 5th/6th Century AD mass grave from Cramond, Edinburgh. This project was funded by the Edinburgh City Council. While conducting her study she was also successful in gaining awards from the Principal’s Excellence Fund and the Development Trust at Aberdeen. The results of this research were presented at the UK Archaeological Sciences Conference in 2015, at Durham University. The results of the isotope work at Cramond were also recently featured in a Museum of Edinburgh exhibition, Dark Goings on in Cramond, which gained national press coverage.

To pursue her interest in the biological sciences as well as archaeology, Orsolya completed an MSc in Bioarchaeology at the University of York, graduating in 2016. Her research looked at survivorship in a post-medieval population from Halifax. Her study aimed to detect pathology related fractionation using dietary isotope data from serial sections of dentine, obtained from four juvenile and four adult individuals.

In October 2016, Orsolya began her AHRC (Arts and Humanities Council) and HES (Historic Environment Scotland) funded PhD research at the University of Aberdeen. Her project is undertaking a Scotland wide diachronic isotopic study to characterise patterns of dietary change from late Iron Age to High Medieval times. Hers is the first targeted large-scale stable isotope study of human remains in Scotland which is looking at temporal and geographical variability in the country.

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