Miss HEATHER TURNBULL

Miss HEATHER TURNBULL
MEng Mechanical Engineering

Research PG

Overview
Miss HEATHER TURNBULL
Miss HEATHER TURNBULL

Contact Details

Email
Address
The University of Aberdeen Fraser Noble Building, Postgraduate centre
University of Aberdeen, School of Engineering
Kings College
Aberdeen AB24 3UE
Scotland, UK

Biography

2015 - Present PhD Structural Engineering
  University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen
  Research - Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbines
  Lloyd’s Register Foundation Centre for Safety and Reliability  
  Engineering
   
2009 - 2014                  MEng Mechanical Engineering
  University of Strathclyde, Glasgow   
   

 

Research

Research Interests

Structural Health Monitoring

Damage Detection and Severity Assessment

Wind Turbine Safety and Reliability

Smart Materials and Structures

 

 

Current Research

Wind Turbine Blades (WTBs) are a key structural component of the Wind Turbine (WT) and are crucial to efficient energy generation. The consequences of blade failure can be catastrophic and therefore a means of continuously monitoring the blades to determine their condition will provide significant benefits.

In this research, physics based Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques will be developed to assess the damage severity of in-service WTBs. Experimental responses from a small scale WTB from a 5kW WT will be obtained then subsequently used to update a Finite Element Model (FEM). Uncertainties will be quantified using soft computing techniques namely application of fuzzy logic to Finite Element Model Updating (FEMU). This process provides a more accurate representation of the healthy structure, ensuring the analytical model closely represents the experimentally observed response.

To evaluate the proposed damage severity estimation method, damage will be introduced both experimentally and numerically. Investigation into the common damage mechanisms and locations will be presented to ensure realistic scenarios are represented. Non-destructive damage will be simulated experimentally through addition of small masses inducing a structural modification similar to damage. For comparison purposes, damage will be simulated numerically via addition of mass elements to the FEM.

Publications

Publications 

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