The Confucius Institute of the University of Aberdeen is delighted to announce that we will host a programme of online lectures and workshops over four weeks, 7th of June to 3rd of July, focusing on Chinese literary translation run in conjunction with Paper Republic. Events are aimed at professional and aspiring translators, and cover a wide range of topics. Please see below for details of the programme. Click on the links for further event and booking information.

Cost

Lectures are free, with registration required via Eventbrite.

Workshops are £30 each (£20 for students), with a discount available for those who sign up for all six (£150/£99). These can be booked via our online store. To ensure the optimum experience, workshop capacity has been limited to 12 participants. Places will be assigned on a first come first served basis. Registration will remain open until 31 May.

The Confucius Institute of the University of Aberdeen is very happy to be able to offer a scholarship covering the cost of all six workshops for one University of Aberdeen student. To appy, please complete this form.

Our friends at the Confucius Institute for Scotland in the University of Edinburgh are offering additional scholarships for two full-time students, enrolled at any university across Scotland. To apply, please complete this form

 

 

Monday

Wednesday

 

Saturday

Week commencing 07/06

 

 

 

Lecture

Philosophy of Translation

Workshop

Translating Xu Xiaobin:  A Feminist Writer with a Difference

Lecture

Paper Republic Translation Slam

Week commencing 14/06

Workshop

Lu Yang: Translating the Slightly Odd

 

 

Workshop

Translating Brands – Mixed Media Transcreation

 

 

Lecture

Working as a Professional Interpreter in the UK: A Chinese-English Perspective

Week commencing 21/06

Lecture

Self-assessment of Interpreting Quality: Based on A Survey of Masters in Interpreting Students in China

Workshop

Translating Children's Books

Lecture

From Aberdeenshire to Hong Kong and Back: James Legge and his Translation of Chinese Classics

 

Week commencing 28/06

Workshop

Translating Contemporary Poetry: Between Translation and Creation

 

 

Workshop

Finding the Literary in the Academic – Translating the Scholarly for All

 

Lecture

Being a Literary Translator – Three Perspectives

 

 Workshops

Text for translation in the workshops will be sent to participants in advance of the event.

Translating Xu Xiaobin: A Feminist Writer with a Difference (Fully booked)

Date and time: Wednesday 9 June, 13:00-15:00

Participants will explore translating the emotional and the political, with a view to finding the fine balance between the two that allows each to sing. Led by Nicky Harman. Texts for translation will be sent out to participants in advance. Book your place here.

Lu Yang: Translating the Slightly Odd

Date and time: Monday 14 June, 18:00-20:00

Lu Yang’s fiction, rich with sensory detail and set off by a playful intellect, poses special challenges for the translator. In this workshop we’ll discuss delicacy, the fine-tuning of sentences, and how to make sure the reader “gets it”. Led by Eric Abrahamsen. Book your place here.

Translating Brands – Mixed Media Transcreation

Date and time: Wednesday 16 June, 13:00-15:00

An opportunity to translate different kinds of marketing communications copy. In the session we will look at the general principles of messaging, including how to think about tone of voice, audience and format requirements. Led by Emily Jones. Book your place here.

Translating Children's Books

Date and time: Wednesday 23 June, 13:00-15:00

A taste of what it's like to translate children's books between two very different languages and cultures, this workshop gives participants the chance to translate both from Chinese into English and from English into Chinese, allowing for a more comprehensive look at the process, and a better understanding of the similarities and differences between translating in each direction. Led by Helen Wang and Stephanie Gou. Book your place here.

Translating Contemporary Poetry: Between Translation and Creation

Date and time: Monday 28 June, 13:00-15:00

Participants will be invited to read and translate contemporary Chinese poems, looking at ways to capture the condensed meanings in poetry as well as to reflect the specific style and voice in the original poems. Led by Jennifer Wong. Book your place here.

Finding the Literary in the Academic – Translating the Scholarly for All

Date and time: Wednesday 30 June, 13:00-15:00

Academic translation is one of the more lucrative fields of translation for the language pair of Chinese and English. It presents a number of unique challenges that a translator must overcome in order to be successful, as well as a number that are not too different from what a literary translator comes up against in their work. This workshop looks at how to navigate both and provides participants with the skills to take on academic translations with confidence. Led by Jack Hargreaves. Book your place here.

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Lectures

Philosophy of Translation

Date and time: Monday 7 June, 19:00-20:00

Translation is a love affair – however fraught – with language, but also a quest for knowledge, truth and beauty. Many talk about the ethics of translation, but what might translation bring to ethics in return? What can translation offer other subfields in philosophy, particularly logic, epistemology, philosophy of mind, philosophy of language and philosophy of art? Is translation a hall of mirrors? How do distinct metaphors guide approaches to translation? The speaker will be Sabina Knight. Register your free place here.

Paper Republic Translation Slam

Date and time: Saturday 12 June, 19:00-20:00

Eric Abrahamsen and May Huang go head-to-head on a text, producing two very different translations and each trying to persuade you that theirs is best. Which one do you prefer and why? How would you have done it? Whose approach might you use in your own translations in the future? These are all tquestions you can answer at this hour-long event and Q&A. Register your free place here.

Working as a Professional Interpreter in the UK: A Chinese-English Perspective 

Date and time: Saturday 19 June, 11:00-12:00

This talk will focus on the experiences of working as a professional interpreter in the UK context, and will include details about public service interpreting, conference interpreting, and interpreting for business delegations. Speakers are Li Li and Xiaopeng Bao. Register your free place here.

Self-assessment of Interpreting Quality: Based on A Survey of Masters in Interpreting Students in China

Date and time: Monday 21 June, 13:00-14:00

Self-assessment of interpreting quality, as a formative assessment approach, can effectively help interpreting learners reflect on their interpreting performance and make progress. However, self-assessment has not fully been applied to interpreting learning. Unlike most researchers who study self-assessment from the perspective of interpreter trainers, Min Huang and Wei Long attempt to explore, from the perspective of interpreting learners, the methods, criteria and assessment sheet for self-assessment of interpreting quality, based on a survey of Interpreting Masters students in China. Register your free place here

From Aberdeenshire to Hong Kong and Back: James Legge and his Translation of Chinese Classics

Date and time: Saturday 26 June, 11:00-12:00

James Legge (1815–1897) is remembered as a missionary, a translator, and a sinologist. Born, bred and educated in Aberdeenshire, he spent the first 30 years of his adulthood in Hong Kong as a missionary and the last 20 years of his life in Oxford as the first Professor of Chinese. He is best known for translating Chinese classical texts into English, including the entire Confucian cannon and two seminal Daoist texts; he also authored important writings on Chinese religions and philosophies. This lecture looks back at his life and pioneering work in introducing China and Chinese thoughts to the Western world through translation, writing and teaching. The speaker will be Zhu Zhu. Register your free place here.

Being a Literary Translator – Three Perspectives

Date and time: Saturday 3 July, 19:00-20:00

Nicky Harman, Jianan Qian and Jack Hargreaves are three translators with very different experiences and practices in translation, who each came to the field in their own way. This hour-long conversation and Q&A will give attendees—whether aspiring or professional translators or simply translation-curious—a behind-the-curtain look at the different ways of becoming and being a literary translator. Register your free place here.

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BIOS:

Eric Abrahamsen is a translator and promoter of Chinese literature in English. He is a founder of Paper Republic, an informational platform for Chinese literature, and editor of Pathlight magazine, a journal of translated Chinese fiction and poetry. He is the recipient of translation grants from PEN and the NEA, and his translations have appeared in The New YorkerGrantan+1, and many other venues.

  

Xiaopeng Bao has 15 years of experience as a freelance interpreter. He is a member of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI) and Chartered Institute of Linguists (CIOL). He currently works as a Teaching Fellow in Interpreting at the University of Aberdeen.

 

  

Stephanie Gou is a cultural and travel columnist and contributor to the major Chinese airlines' in-flight magazines. She wrote a blog to review children’s theatre and literature. Recently, she translated an award-winning Israeli picture book The Penguin Café at the Edge of the World. She runs Lit-up Mandarin Book Club (小桔灯云书房) for ENG-CHN bilingual families, where children meet up every week via zoom to share the storybooks they love.

  

Jack Hargreaves is from East Yorkshire. An award-winning academic translator, his translations of Chinese-language literature have appeared on Asymptote Journal, adda (forthcoming), LA Review of Books China ChannelLitHub and Words Without Borders, and include writing by Shen Dacheng, Zhu Yiye, Yuan Ling, Liu Xinglong and Ye Duoduo. Recent and forthcoming translations include Li Juan’s Winter Pasture and Chai Jing’s Seeing with Yan Yan, A History of Chinese Philosophical Thought by Zhang Xianghao and Buddhism and Buddhology by Hong Xiuping. As one of ALTA’s 2021 Emerging Translator Mentees, under Jeremy Tiang’s guidance, he is completing a translation of Chia Joo Ming’s Reconstructing the Image of Nanyang. (Twitter: @JackDHargreaves)

Nicky Harman lives in London and Weymouth, and translates full-time from Chinese, focussing on fiction, literary non-fiction, and occasionally poetry. She mentors new translators, gives regular talks and workshops on translation, and is a trustee of Paper-Republic.org.  She won the 2020 China Special Book Award, the 2015 Mao Tai Cup People’s Literature Chinese-English translation prize, and the 2013 China International Translation Contest. She was co-Chair of the Translators Association (Society of Authors, UK) from 2014 to 2017. She blogs on Asian Books Blog, and tweets, with Helen Wang, as China Fiction Book Club @cfbcuk.

May Huang is a writer and translator from Hong Kong and Taiwan. Her translations of Chinese literature have appeared or are forthcoming in Circumference, Asymptote, World Literature Today, The Common, and elsewhere. She graduated from the University of Chicago with honours in English and Comparative Literature in 2019. In 2020, she was a mentee in ALTA's Emerging Translator Mentorship Program and a finalist for the Gulf Coast Translation Prize.

 

Dr. Min Huang is an associate professor and vice dean at the Department of Translation and Interpreting, Wuhan University, central China. He mentors MTI students and has 18 years of experience as an interpreter trainer, an interpreting researcher, as well as a part-time interpreter and translator. He is an expert member of the Translators Association of China (TAC), vice director of the Interpreting Education and Assessment Union (IEAU), secretary-general of the Translators Association of Hubei (TAHB). He is author of more than 20 interpreting textbooks. His current research interest focuses on interpreting quality assessment and interpreting accreditation testing.

Emily Jones learnt Chinese at the universities of Cambridge, Ningbo and Qingdao and was the recipient of a BCLT mentorship in translation in 2011. Her translations include the crime novel 《性之罪》, translated as Black Holes, by何家弘 He Jiahong; 《天行者》, translated as The Sky Dwellers, by 刘醒龙 Liu Xinglong; 《开埠》(title forthcoming) by 王雨 Wang Yu; and 《李喬短篇小說精選集》translated as Fiction and Other Stories, by 李喬 Lee Chiao as well as samples, short stories, poetry, fiction and non-fiction for various publishers. She is a founding Trustee of Paper Republic, and also Managing Partner of the brand and marketing consultancy Circus.

Sabina Knight is author of The Heart of Time: Moral Agency in Twentieth-Century Chinese Fiction (2006), Chinese Literature: A Very Short Introduction (2012, translated into three languages), and essays in The National Interest, 翻译家的对话 [Translators’ Dialogues], and journals of literature, Chinese studies, and medical humanities. Since 1998 Knight has taught Chinese and comparative literature at Smith College. She is also a translator, a speaker on Chinese-English literary and cultural translation, and a fellow in the Public Intellectuals Program of the National Committee on US-China Relations. Sabina began as a philosophy major, but the field’s disregard of both women and Chinese philosophy led to her exile in literature. She remains a wannabe philosopher.

Li Li is a Chinese-English interpreter and translator in legal, business and conference settings. Over the last two decades, she has also worked as a lecturer in English, EAP, Chinese, and Interpreting and Translation in China and the UK. As an advocate of lifelong learning and professionalism, she is a member of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI), the Chartered Institute of Linguists (CIOL), and is on the National Register of Public Service Interpreters (NRPSI). Li Li is a CHASE-AHRC funded PhD candidate at the University of East Anglia, researching remote healthcare interpreting. 

Wei Long is a Chinese-English translator and interpreter based in Wuhan, China. Her translations are mainly in fiction, films, and political and economic settings. She's a member of the Translators Association of Hubei (TAHB). Currently, she's pursuing a Masters in Translation and Interpreting (MTI) at Wuhan University, where her research focuses on interpreting quality assessment.

 

Jianan Qian writes in and translates into both English and Chinese. In her native language Chinese, she has published four original works and translated four books from English. Her latest translation work is Henry David Thoreau: A Life by Laura Dassow Walls. In English, she is a staff writer at the Millions. Her work and translations have appeared in the New York TimesGrantaGulf Coast, and elsewhere. She holds an MFA in fiction from the Iowa Writers' Workshop. Currently, she is pursuing a PhD in Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Southern California.

Helen Wang has translated novels by Cao Wenxuan, Shen Shixi, Man-Chiu Lin and Qin Wenjun, and early readers and picture books by many other writers and illustrators. Her translation of Cao Wenxuan's novel Bronze and Sunflower won the 2017 Marsh Award for Children's Literature in Translation. She co-runs the blog Chinese Books for Young Readers (Twitter: @cb4yr)

 

Jennifer Wong, born and brought up in Hong Kong, is the author of several collections including Goldfish (Chameleon Press) and a pamphlet, Diary of a Miu Miu Salesgirl (Bitter Melon Poetry 2019). Her latest collection, 回家 Letters Home (Nine Arches Press 2020)—which engages with the idea of translating across cultures—has been named the PBS Wild Card Choice by Poetry Book Society. Her poetry translations have appeared in PathlightModern Poetry in TranslationWashington Square ReviewPoetry London and other publications. She has a creative writing PhD from Oxford Brookes University and teaches creative writing at Poetry School, City Lit and Oxford Brookes. She has taught a course on ‘between translation and creation: getting inspired by Chinese art and films’ at Poetry School. She is currently writer-in-residence at Wasafiri.

Zhu Zhu, a lecturer and researcher in Translation Studies and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Aberdeen, is also an English-Chinese translator. Her recent translated books include Nigel Warburton’s A Little History of Philosophy (《哲学小史》2021), Orlando Figes’s Crimean War: A History (《克里米亚战争:被遗忘的帝国博弈》2018), Edward Hollis’s The Secret Lives of Buildings (《建筑的前世今生》2014) and Miles Glendinning’s Architecture’s Evil Empire? (《迷失的建筑帝国》2013). She is currently working on Simon Schama’s Patriots and Liberators: Revolution in the Netherlands 1780-1813, which is to be published in China in 2022. 

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