Aberdeen researchers have developed a novel antibody that demonstrates clear activity against Candida albicans in vitro in an immune system-independent manner.

About the technology

Fungal infections are a major health problem with 300 million people affected worldwide each year leading to 2 million deaths. In the developed world, seriously ill and immune-compromised patients are at greatest risk of lethal infection and current antifungal drugs are restricted to 3 broad classes, polyenes, azoles and echinocandins with continued problems of resistance and toxicity. The global market for antifungals is predicted to reach $12.2 billion by 2016 so there is clear incentive to develop novel effective therapies. A particular problem is caused by the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans that exists as a harmless commensal in 50% of the population, however it is estimated to be responsible for up to 35% of deaths in intensive care units in hospitals.

Aberdeen researchers have developed a novel antibody that demonstrates clear activity against C. albicans in vitro in an immune system-independent manner. This is a key point when most patients are not going to be able to mount effective immune responses. The exact details are the subject of a patent application but further information can be disclosed under CDA. Testing is underway to assess its activity against a variety of other fungi.

The University believes that the antibody has potential for a number of therapeutic, prophylactic and diagnostic uses in immune-compromised patients. The University of Aberdeen is keen to engage with potential partners to explore collaborative and licensing opportunities.

Applications and benefits

Applications

  • Treatment of seriously ill and immune-compromised individuals
  • Prophylaxis of at risk patients
  • Diagnosis of fungal infections

Benefits

  • Targeted anti-Candida antibody
  • Novel mode of action that does not require patient immune system
  • Reduced toxic side effects compared to chemical antifungal agents
  • Potential to be used for other fungi
IP

UK priority patent application filed

For further information, contact

Dr James Duncan, Research & Innovation

Email: James Duncan

Tel: 01224 272918