Globalization MSc

Globalization, MSc

Introduction

Our MSc in Globalisation provides you with the tools for engaging in meaningful dialogues with important people from around the world.

Key Facts

Duration
1 Year / 2 Years
Study Mode
Full Time / Part Time
Start Month
September
Learning Mode
On Campus Learning

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Overview

Globalisation is widely regarded as one of the most important societal changes of our times, one that affects people living all around the world. Since the late 1980s, globalisation has become an important research field in the social sciences, as well as a major concern of policy-makers and citizens alike. Social scientists enter into meaningful dialogues about the benefits and drawbacks of globalisation with government officials, corporate executives, leaders from civil society and the general public.

Our Globalisation Programme should appeal to you especially if you want to deepen your understanding of the diverse types of societal changes being driven by globalisation. The MSc Globalisation programme reflects international research expertise of the Department of Sociology and the degree programme was the first of its kind in Scotland. After successfully completing the degree programme, you will understand advanced social scientific perspectives on the subject. You will also understand the cultural, social, political, and economic dimensions of globalisation, the relationship between local and global societal change, and gain skills that sustain lifelong learning and intellectual development. You will also learn how to undertake independent social scientific research.

What You'll Study

The information below applies to the 1 year full time / 2 year part time on campus learning MSc programme which runs in September.

Semester 1

Compulsory Courses

Advanced Social Theory (SO5014)

Karl Popper argued, wisely, at least this time, that ‘all languages are theory-impregnated’. In this course we learn to reflect explicitly about that which may otherwise simply remain implicit in empirical sociological examination. In this project, we are assisted by important thinkers who have developed distinctive and influential ways of considering the social. We begin with classical sociological theory (Marx, Weber, Nietzsche) before moving on to the work of more recent social thought (including, Actor Network Theory and Dorothy Smith), giving students an advanced working knowledge of the most important theoretical tools available to jobbing social scientists.

Qualitative Sociology: Philosophy and Methods (SO5011)

Qualitative Sociology: Philosophy and Methods: This course introduces students to a range of methods used in qualitative sociological research (such as participant observation, qualitative interviewing, focus groups, diaries, photography and film, and archived data sources). The emphasis will be on the research process, from project design to analysis and presentation, with methodological issues raised in the context of researchable questions. Issues of reliability, representativeness and validity, and the potential for combining methods will be addressed. Students use the course work to develop their research interests and reflect on their research practices.

Semester 2

Compulsory Courses

Dimensions of Globalization (SO5512)

This interdisciplinary course focuses on substantive dimensions of globalization by considering recent changes occurring in the economic, political, social, and cultural realms of society. These themes are analyzed by considering recent empirical studies, which seek to clarify our theoretical understanding of globalization through advanced social scientific research. The substantive themes covered include global capitalism, the global division of labour, global governance, the changing role of the nation‐state, transnational social change, and cultural homogenization and heterogenization. Interconnections between these aspects of globalization are highlighted.

Optional Courses

One specialist option (related to dissertation topic) from the following list:

Religious Belief and Practice in the Modern World (SO5514)

Aberdeen University has long been known for its focus on the sociology of religion and is currently the only University in Britain where one can study sociology of religion at the postgraduate level in a sociology department. This course is required for students on the MSc in Religion and Society, and essential for any other students who wish to develop a sophisticated sociological understanding of religion, including postgraduates with other primary research interests (religion having implications for many other topics), and would also benefit postgraduate students of religion coming from other disciplines.

Quantitative Sociology: Philosophy & Methods (SO5523)

All researchers need to understand quantitative research, not only those who carry it out themselves. Everyone comes across quantitative research in literature reviews and even in the press. In this course students will acquire an understanding of the most common quantitative methods they are likely to use or come across in published sociological research. The module will encompass different types of quantitative study and address issues such as when quantitative methods are appropriate, how quantitative questions are formulated, research design, sampling (both online and offline), scale construction, reliability and validity and ethical practices in quantitative research and design.

The Comparative Study of European Societies (SO5515)

The core course will look at Europe as a society as well as by comparing different nations and regions within it. It will look not just at the European Union, but also countries that are also in the broadest sense “European” stretching to the former Soviet Union and the former Yugoslavia. It will address key contemporary issues such as citizenship and belonging, identities in a European context, work, family and the demographic challenge as well as work‐life balance.

Post - Conflict Justice and Peacebuilding (SO5525)

This course is divided into three sections. The first half of the course introduces students to the central mechanisms and processes by which the international community attempts to provide justice and peace in post-conflict contexts, before presenting in a series of lectures the complications and current challenges to post-conflict and justice as both an academic field and an area of practice. The course is particularly designed to inspire students to consider the complicated nature of post-conflict issues through a number of different case studies and perspectives.

Global Conflict and Peace Processes (SO5526)

The course familiarises the student with the field of the sociology of peace processes, which is one of the growth areas within sociology and related areas internationally. It establishes the nature of sociology’s distinctive contribution to the study of peace processes and the conceptual and empirical focus of this approach. The course places particular emphasis on three areas, religion, gender and civil society. It addresses three international peace processes in particular, Northern Ireland, South Africa and Sri Lanka, and critically assesses the contribution in each of religion, civil society and gender.

Semester 3

Compulsory Courses

Dissertation in Globalization (SO5901)

Students who meet the necessary requirements proceed to the dissertation. Students identify an appropriate dissertation topic in consultation with the programme co-ordinator. The dissertation is especially designed to extend an interest which students develop throughout the programme, particularly whilst undertaking the specialist and elective courses in the second semester, and to have experience in formulating, designing and conducting their own social science research investigation. The dissertation can also be library-based around conceptual and theoretical issues.

We will endeavour to make all course options available; however, these may be subject to timetabling and other constraints. Please see our InfoHub pages for further information.

How You'll Study

Learning Methods

  • Lectures
  • Tutorials
  • Research
  • Individual Projects

Assessment

Assessment methods vary from course to course and include essays, reports, exercises and presentations. The compulsory courses are 100% continuous assessment, perhaps with the exception of the specialist option. The MSc in Globalization requires the student to pass the dissertation and the four modules. The degree of MSc shall not be awarded to candidates who fail to achieve a CGC mark of D3 or above in the Dissertation (SO5901), irrespective of their performance in other courses.

Why Study Globalization?

  • Our MSc in Globalisation is taught in Aberdeen, a major international hub of connected industries in the energy sector.
  • You are taught by experts in understanding globalisation as a social science.

Fees and Funding

You will be classified as one of the fee categories below.

For international students entering in 2017/18, the 2017/18 tuition fee rate will apply to all years of study.

Fees and Funding Table for HOME, EU, RUK and International Students
Nationality Status Amount
Home / EU / RUK Students Tuition fee for main award £4,500
International Students Tuition fee for main award £13,800
  • In exceptional circumstances there may be additional fees associated with specialist courses, for example field trip courses. Any additional fees for a course can be found in our Catalogue of Courses.
  • For more information about tuition fees for this programme, including payment plans and our refund policy, please visit our InfoHub Tuition Fees page.

Funding

View all funding options in our Funding Database.

Entry Requirements

Applicants for admission will normally be expected to hold a relevant Honours degree with at least 2:1 standard from a recognised university or body. In exceptional circumstances, applicants without this qualification may be admitted subject to having an alternative qualification, or an approved level of work experience, appropriate to the field of study.

Qualifications

References are not required in order for applicants to submit an application. They are not usually required in order for a decision to be made but in certain cases applicants may be asked to provide a single academic reference at the request of the academic selector.

Language Requirements

All students entering the University must provide evidence that they can use English well enough to study effectively at the University of Aberdeen.

Details of our English language entry requirements can be found on our English Language Requirements webpages. This programme requires that you meet the College of Arts and Social Sciences Postgraduate Standard level of English proficiency.

If you have not achieved the required scores, the University of Aberdeen offers pre-sessional English courses. Further details are available on our Language Centre website.

Nationals of some English-speaking countries or those who hold degrees from some English-speaking countries may be exempted from this requirement. Details of countries recognised as English-speaking can be found on our English Language Requirements webpages.

Facilities

We are a medium-sized department, which allows us to be small enough to sustain an intimate and friendly atmosphere. The College of Arts and Social Sciences and School of Social Sciences provide several institutes which may be of interest to you: Centre for European Survey Research, New Europe Centre and Centre for Global Security and Governance.

Careers

Upon completion of the programme, students should be well positioned for a variety of jobs dealing with global processes and international affairs, or for continued studies in the social sciences at the doctoral level. Mid-career professionals, seeking to continue their career and intellectual development, will also benefit from this degree programme.

Careers could include:

  • Positions in global NGOs
  • Journalism
  • Politics
  • Publishing
  • Teaching
  • Business
  • Academia

Our Experts

The globalization programme is led by Christopher Kollmeyer, a senior lecturer in the Department of Sociology whose research focuses on economic and political aspects of globalization. He holds MA and PhD degrees from the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he was a faculty fellow in the Global and International Studies Program from 2003 to 2005.

Programme Coordinator
Dr Christopher Kollmeyer

You will be taught by a range of experts including professors, lecturers, teaching fellows and postgraduate tutors. Staff changes will occur from time to time; please see our InfoHub pages for further information.

Contact

Address
School of Social Science
University of Aberdeen
Edward Wright Building
Dunbar Street
Aberdeen

AB24 3QY
Email
Phone
+44 (0)1224 272762
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