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SS5008
Global Soil Geography
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Graeme Paton and Dr Zachary Hickman

Pre-requisite(s):

Aims: To enable students to understand the factors and processes controlling the formation of soils in the world; to gain a working knowledge of the system of classifying soils; to develop skills in describing and surveying soils in the field. The course has an extensive field work component focussing on the production of a detailed soil map.

Learning Objectives: By the end of the course you should be able to:

1. demonstrate understanding of the processes that control soil formation in different parts of the world, the global distribution of soils and their classification;

2. describe and identify soils in the field;

3. interpret the landscape and use different types of information to construct maps.

3 one-hour lectures per week and four field trips

Continuous assessment focussing on fieldwork linkage to taught course.

SS5009
Advanced Pedology
CREDIT POINTS 5

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Gaeme Paton

Pre-requisite(s): SS5008

Post-field trip discussion sessions to investigate and describe observed soils. This will also include exercises in classification, surveying considerations and mapping requirements. Soil description and general field trip consolidation is at the fore. Additionally, soil samples will be explored in terms of laboratory observations, utilising a variety of methods introduced each week.

4 two hour discussion and desk based investigation sessions following each full days field trip, and lab based sessions during the 6 week period.

A field/lab notebook submission.

SS5500
Remediation Technology
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Graeme Paton and Dr Zachary Hickman

Pre-requisite(s):

Aims: To enable students to develop a theoretical grounding in this important topic and to link this to the application and policy issues accordingly. A component of the course will focus on training students in key skills suited to a remediation officer that operates as part of a large company or as a regulator. By the end of the course you should be able to:

1. demonstrate understanding of what constitutes contamination; the factors that make pollutants available; the suitability of techniques to address specific environmental issues; and how scientific questions link to social, political and regulatory parameters;

2. predict pollutant pathways; source key information for remediation; develop and implement sample strategies;
and

3. relate academic findings to non-expert groups. Deal with kinetic models and predictive concepts; write in a scientific style using suitable language.

3 one-hour lectures per week, 2 computing practicals and four tutorials.

Continuous assessment based on developing Phase I, II and II environmental reports.

SS5507
Soil Science Research & Investigation
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr. Zachary Hickman & Prof. Graeme Paton

Pre-requisite(s):

Research and investigation project involving (where applicable) project planning, experimental design, sampling design, independent data collection, modelling and interpretation

No formal contact but regular meetings with supervisory team for the research project as well as technical supervision in the laboratory and/or field (as appropriate).

The Soil Science Research & Investigation project write-up will be in the style of a manuscript for an agreed academic journal reflecting the particular discipline of the research project conducted. The field/laboratory notebook will also be submitted to ensure that the data are original and collected by the student. Marks are awarded both on account of the quality of the research performed, on the data analysis carried out, as well as the presentation and interpretation of the results. There are two internal University markers, one of them being the project supervisor.

SS58AP
Advanced Project in Soil Science
CREDIT POINTS 90

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Graeme I Paton

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): Students who have passed the taught components on the MSc Soil Science programme will be permitted to proceed to this course.

Course Aims:
To demonstrate critical thinking within a selected research subject
To collect, manage and interpret empirical and/or modelled data
To write in a scientific manner similar to that required by peer-reviewed publications

Main Learning Outcomes:
How to manage time and resources in a research project
To review scientific literature
How to link project data to scientific literature findings
To interpret data and present it in a valid and critical manner
To develop a critical appraisal or a research project and place this in a scientific context
To demonstrate written and oral communication as a research scientist
To maintain a laboratory or field notebook

Content: Research project involving independent data collection, modelling and interpretation.

No formal contact but regular meetings with supervisory team for the research project as well as technical supervision in the laboratory and/or field (as appropriate)

The thesis will be in the style of manuscript for an agreed academic journal reflecting the particular discipline of the research project conducted. The field/laboratory notebook will also be submitted to make sure that the data are original and collected by the student. Marks are awarded both on account of the quality of the research performed, on the data analysis carried out, as well as the presentation and interpretation of the results. There are two internal University markers, one of them being the project supervisor.

SS5904
Land Use and the Changing Environment on Deeside
CREDIT POINTS 3

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Graeme Paton and Dr Zachary Hickman

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): MSc Environmental Science and Soil Science (compulsory) MSc Environmental Microbiology (Optional)

The course considers not just the current and past land-uses on Deeside but also places this in the context of future changes as a consequence of environmental changes and economics. The course also addresses the impact of the National Park in local, national and international context.

Five day-field trip, visits to local Environmental industries

One written report (100%)

SS5905
Project in Soil Science
CREDIT POINTS 60

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Graeme I Paton

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): Students who have passed the taught components on the MSc Soil Science programme will be permitted to proceed to this course.

Course Aims:
To demonstrate critical thinking within a selected research subject.
To collect, manage and interpret empirical and/or modelled data.
To write in a scientific manner similar to that required by peer-reviewed publications.

Main Learning Outcomes:
How to manage time and resources in a research project
to review scientific literature
How to link project data to scientific literature findings
To interpret data and present it in a valid and critical manner
to develop a critical appraisal of a research project and place this in a scientific context
to demonstrate written and oral communication as a research scientist
to maintain a laboratory or field notebook.

Content: Research project involving independent data collection, modelling and interpretation

No formal contact but regular meetings with supervisory team for the research project as well as technical supervision in the laboratory and/or field (as appropriate).

The thesis will be in the style of manuscript for an agreed academic journal reflecting the particular discipline of the research project conducted. The field/laboratory notebook will also be submitted to make sure that the data are original and collected by the student. Marks are awarded both on account of the quality of the research performed, on the data analysis carried out, as well as the presentation and interpretation of the results. There are two internal University markers, one of them being the project supervisor.