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PU5002
Health Economics
CREDIT POINTS 10

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Diane Skatun

Pre-requisite(s): N/A

Co-requisite(s): N/A

Note(s): The aim of the course is to introduce students to the application of economic thinking to the analysis of health policy and health systems.

Topics covered by the course include:

Priority setting in health care.
Economic evaluation of health interventions.
Health Systems.
Payment systems and incentives
Equity.

The material to be covered combines the conceptual and the theoretical with practical applications of health economic thinking. Sessions will involve lectures, group work, open discussion and occasional seminars from 'visitors' who will bring a variety of practical experiences to the classroom.

The course will be assessed on one group work presentation, one assignment and a final exam. The group work presentations will be worth 10% of your final mark. The assignment will be worth 40% of your final mark and the exam will be worth 50% of your mark.

PU5003
Health Services Research
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Clare Robertson

Pre-requisite(s): N/A

Co-requisite(s): N/A

Note(s): The aim of the course is to equip students with the skills and information needed to appraise and undertake health services research.

Topics covered by the course include:

Background to, scope and purpose of health services research.
The relationship of research and practice.
Introduction to research designs.
Experimental designs.
Quasi-experimental designs.
Structure, process and outcome.
Questionnaire design.
Qualitative research methods.
Reviewing previous research.
Critical appraisal of health services research.
Perspectives and values.
Ethical considerations in health services research.
Perspectives and values.
Ethical considerations in health services research.
Reporting the findings of, and writing up research.
Data management and analysis and reports of findings.
Use of health services research in policy and changing practice.

This course will be taught in two-hour seminars twice weekly, with one 2-hour and 30 minute lecture to provide exam feedback.

An examination will be held during the first half of the session that contributes to 40% of the total mark for the course. There will also be a protocol for an evaluation of an innovation in health care assignment which contributes 60% of the total mark for the course.

PU5004
Managing for Health
CREDIT POINTS 10

Course Co-ordinator: Professor Lorna McKee

Pre-requisite(s): N/A

Co-requisite(s): N/A

To provide a theoretical framework for understanding organisational change in Health Care organisations.

To increase awareness of strategic change: design and implementation.

To develop knowledge and insights concerning topical NHS change challenges

To build transferable skills with regard to communication, group work, problem solving and team building

Participants are expected to draw on and share their personal experiences of the topics covered and small group activities will be a prominent feature of this module. Some formal lectures will be used to introduce new material, but these are complemented by focussed discussion, practical exercises and group work.

The course will be taught by weekly two-hour sessions. Student groups will be encouraged to accept responsibility for small sections of the syllabus, which will entail making presentations and leading discussions. They are expected to develop a working knowledge of the NHS through group task work.

At the end of the course, students will be asked to make group presentations drawing on the themes covered throughout the course. This will not be part of the formal assessment but a chance to reflect on learning and presentation skills. Feedback will be provided taking account of presentation, content and style. Vignettes or topics will be provided at the beginning of the course.

The assessment will be via an individual written assignment to be handed in at the end of the course.

PU5005
Applied Statistics
CREDIT POINTS 10

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Gordon Prescott

Pre-requisite(s): n/a

Co-requisite(s): n/a

Note(s): This course is taken by students registered for a wide range of MSc programmes based in the School of Medicine and Dentistry and by some University staff. Everyone attending lectures must be registered for the course.

This course intends to develop the student's awareness of the fact that statistical techniques are integral to scientific research. Researchers must be able to specify a precise research question in statistical terms and then select an appropriate study design in order to carry out an effective research project. They must also be able to assess the adequacy of the research presented in scientific or medical literature. The same skills are also required for many MSc dissertation projects.

This course equips the student with knowledge of statistical principles and statistical methods. In addition, the student will gain experience of analysing, presenting and interpreting numerical information.

The course will cover the following:

What are data? Data types and presentation of data
What is chance? Probability
How does my data relate to the real world? Samples, distributions, statistical inference
Answering research questions with statistical techniques. Hypothesis testing
What if my data are awkward? Non-parametric methods
How does one variable relate to the other? Correlation and simple linear regression
How does one variable relate to several others? Multiple linear regression
Study design for research. Odds ratios and relative risks
Awkward data. Transformations
Relating binary health outcomes to other variables. Logistic regression

Lectures on Thursday morning and tutorials on Friday morning

The course will be assessed using a multiple choice class test for 10%, a written assessment for 30% and an examination in January (60%). Both the assignment and the examination are compulsory for all students and staff who attend the course.

PU5006
Public Health
CREDIT POINTS 5

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Amudha Poobalan

Pre-requisite(s): N/A

Co-requisite(s): N/A

The purpose of this course is to set the courses from the rest of the programme into the context in which they are used to improve the health of the public.

The module starts with an introduction to the history and background to public health, health promotion and disease prevention and emphasises the extent to which the principles and strategies of public health have evolved over the last century. This will include a description of international public health.

This course will be assessed on a multiple choice test (30%) and a short essay (70%) that will enable you to discuss public health issues and relate to your knowledge and learning from other courses.

PU5009
Epidemiology
CREDIT POINTS 10

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Gareth Jones

Pre-requisite(s): N/A

Co-requisite(s): N/A

Note(s): This course provides a basic understanding of epidemiology -the study of the distribution and determinants of disease in the population.

Topics covered by course include:
Introduction to epidemiology/Measurements of disease occurrence
Introduction to the study of populations/Routine data
Study design
Estimating in epidemiological studies
Validity and reliability
Bias and confounding
Practical issues in conducting epidemiological studies
Causality/Critical appraisal

The course will be taught in twelve 1 and 1/2 hour, weekly sessions. The lectures outline the main theoretical and epidemiological principles but, thereafter, students are expected to expand on this with further reading - either from the recommended textbooks, or from other epidemiology literature/papers, as detailed in the lectures.

The course will be assessed by two methods:-
Coursework assignment - students will be required to produce a 1000 word report, outlining a research proposal for an epidemiological study. The assignment will be worth 25% of the mark for the total course.
Formal examination - students will be required to sit a formal exam, worth 75% of the mark for the total course.

PU5010
Public Health B
CREDIT POINTS 10

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Amudha Poobalan

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): This course provides a basic understanding of epidemiology -the study of the distribution and determinants of disease in the population.

Topics covered by course include:
Introduction to epidemiology/Measurements of disease occurrence
Introduction to the study of populations/Routine data
Study design
Estimating in epidemiological studies
Validity and reliability
Bias and confounding
Practical issues in conducting epidemiological studies
Causality/Critical appraisal
Non-Governmental Organisations

The course will be taught in twelve 1 and 1/2 hour, weekly sessions. The lectures outline the main theoretical and epidemiological principles but, thereafter, students are expected to expand on this with further reading - either from the recommended textbooks, or from other epidemiology literature/papers, as detailed in the lectures.

20% Multiple Choice Test
50% Structured Essay
30% Presentation on NGOs

PU5012
Health Psychology
CREDIT POINTS 10

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Julia Allan

Pre-requisite(s): A degree or equivalent qualification at the prescribed standard in any discipline.

Note(s): This course is primarily designed to be an option for students undertaking the Health Services Research and Public Health MSc or the International Health MSc, but it is also expected to be available as a Continuing Professional Development course to members of staff/postgraduates at the University, including the training component of funded training fellowships.

Topics covered include;

- The importance of behaviour for maintaining and promoting health
- Health professional behaviour
- Behaviour in trials
- Predicting behaviour with psychological theory
- Prominent theories in health, social and cognitive psychology
- Cognitive and emotional factors in health and illness
- The development of methods to measure behaviour
- Behaviour change techniques (components of interventions)

1x 2 hour lecture (including practical work) per week.

1x 2 hour examination (60%); continuous assessment (40%).

PU5013
Environmental and Occupational Medicine
CREDIT POINTS 10

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Finlay Dick

Pre-requisite(s): A degree, or equivalent qualification at the prescribed standard in any discipline.

Lectures and tutorials on Hazard identification and risk assessment, Occupational disease, Occupational lung disease, Occupational skin disease, Human factors, Health and work, Exposure assessment, Exposure controls including PPE, Sources of information on hazards, legislation and occupational health issues, Soil pollution, Air pollution, Water pollution, Zoonoses, Risk communication, Emerging Occupational/Environmental health issues. Two practical sessions on the calibration and use of workplace and environmental monitoring equipment. Continuous assessment will be based on an environmental/occupational case study.

15 one hour lectures, 5 one hour tutorials in support off lectures, and two x two hour practical sessions will be delivered equating to two hours contact time per week.

1 two hour written examination (60%); continuous assessment (40%).

PU5502
International Health
CREDIT POINTS 20

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Janet Kyle

Pre-requisite(s): N/A

Co-requisite(s): N/A

Note(s): The main aim of this module is to develop critical analysis of issues within international health. International health policy, health systems, major global health problems and comparative health care research will be explored. Some tools and techniques for cross cultural research and evaluations will be provided.

Topics covered by the course include:

Origins and responses to current international health issues

Millennium Development Goas (MDGs)-Goals, Targets and Indicators

Different forms of organisation of health care and health care delivery

The structure and functions, and strength and weakness of organisations in international health

Complex emergencies and health care management during war, civil conflict or disaster

Importance of health promotion disease prevention

Maternal mortality in a global perspective

Globalisation and health including health worker migration

Reproductive and sexual health including HIV/AIDS

Issues around the failure of many health development projects including politics and advocacy in international health

The role of culture in the organisation of health care

Evaluation and research in developing countries

The course will be taught in two hour seminars twice weekly. This module runs from Week 30 (January) right through until Week 38 (March)

Assessment of this course will be continuous assessment and an exam:
Essay 40%
Presentation 10%
Final written exam 50%

PU5503
Perspectives on Global Health
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Janet Kyle

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): The course is open to students taking the MLitt/Pg Dip International Relations

The course will cover the following:
Key public health problems in the world (e.g. poverty. Malaria, HIV., etc)
Comparison of ways health care is organised in different countries
Workings of the international (health) organisations.
Dealing with complex emergencies
Importance of disease prevention and screening
Sexual and reproductive health issues
Health care projects in a developing world: problems with aid?
The role of culture in health care organisation
Evaluation and research in health care and public health in developing countries
The importance of health in IR the IPE context of health management; health as security.

One two-hour lecture and 1 one hour tutorial (to be arranged) per week. [To be given by staff from the school of medicine]. Students taking the 30 credit version of this course will also be given an additional 2 lectures, 2 tutorials and a 2-hour project workshop to cover the additional material and project support [To be offered by Dr Riru Vij].

Times to be decided in order not to clash with: BU 5503; BU 5302; BU 5518; and the new MBA module Leading International health Care [BU5545]; as well as all semester two courses offered on the MLitt International Relations.

1 two hour written exam (40%); continuous assessment (60%)

PU5504
Public Health Nutrition
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Geraldine McNeill

Pre-requisite(s): The course will be restricted to students on the MSc/PgDip Public Health Nutrition programme. The courses MT5007 and PU5005 are pre-requisites for this course.

Learning and seminars on survey methods, nutrition epidemiology, nutrition interventions in the community, nutrition policy, communicating nutrition advice at a population level and a community nutrition attachment.

8 one-hour lectures (Mon, Tues and Thurs am) or 4 two-hour seminars per week. Community placements for 2-4 days to be arranged on an individual basis.

Two 2-hour written examinations (70%) and continuous assessment (30%).

PU5509
Research Project
CREDIT POINTS 120

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Debbi Marais

Pre-requisite(s): x

x

Meetings with supervisor(s)

Oral presentation (20%); thesis (80%).

PU5902
International Health Thesis
CREDIT POINTS 60

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Janet Kyle

Pre-requisite(s):

x

Meetings with supervisor(s)

Oral protocol presentation (15%); 15,000 word thesis (70%); poster presentation (15%).

PU5903
Research Project in Public Health Nutrition
CREDIT POINTS 90

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Geraldine McNeill

Pre-requisite(s): The course will be restricted to students on the MSc Public Health Nutrition programme. The courses MT5007, PU5005 and the new course "Public Health Nutrition" are pre-requisites for this course.

Research work as dictated by the specific project.

Research work as dictated by the specific project.

Thesis (75%), oral presentation (25).

PU5904
Global Health Research Project
CREDIT POINTS 90

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Janet Kyle

Pre-requisite(s): 60 credits (International Health PU5502; Using Evidence in Practice NU5512; Leading International Health Care BU5545)

Workshop on systematic reviewing techniques - searching, data extraction, meta-analysis and writing up. This will enable students to conduct their own systematic review of a focussed, topical global health issue.

1 day workshop and at least 2 one-hour tutorials. Regular meetings (generally every two weeks) with supervisor to provide individualised support and guidance.

Oral protocol presentation (15%); Thesis (70%); Poster presentation (15%).