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IR5001
Theories and Concepts in International Relations
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Mustapha Pasha

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): Successful completion of this course is required for the award of Pg Dip and MSc in IR.

This course lays the foundations for, explores, and critically analyses the main theoretical paradigms and debates in International Relations, and engages with the complexity of debates on concepts in IR. The theoretical topics to be covered include debates on the international system, cooperation, world order, conflict, development, representation and identity. Students will also be introduced to some of the main debates in epistemology and methodology that apply to the discipline.

[e.g. 3 one hour lectures (Tue, Wed, Thur at 11) and 1 one hour tutorial (to be arranged) per week]

1 one hour lecture and 1 two hour seminar per week (Times TBA)

Continuous assessment (50%), one two-hour written examination (50%).
One two-hour written examination (100%)

IR5006
Theories of International Relations
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Andrea Teti

Pre-requisite(s): This course is available only to students at level 5 (Pg5).

This course provides an introduction to the principal schools of thought in International Relations (IR), with a particular focus on the use of theory in analyzing global political phenomena such as development, democracy, globalization and political violence. Students will be introduced to the inter-paradigmatic debates and the importance of and debates over the key concepts in IR (e.g. sovereignty and security). The course also provides an introduction to key topics and trends in contemporary global affairs and to modern and contemporary global history.

1 two-hour seminar and 1 one-hour hour tutorial

1 two-hour written examination (50%) (three questions to be chosen from two sections, minimum of one question from each section)
continuous assessment (50%).
Continuous assessment will take the form of two 3,000-word research essays, with a formative (not assessed) presentation.

IR5503
International Human Rights
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Prof. Neil Mitchell

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): None

The course content includes the historical and philosophical foundations of human rights, specific case analyses of human rights violations, structural, institutional, cultural and individual level theoretical approaches to human rights violations, international and regional organizations and human rights, foreign policy and human rights, and international and national responses to the legacies of human rights violations, for example truth commissions.

1 one hour lecture and 1 two hour seminar per week

1 two hour written examination (60%); continuous assessment (40%)

IR5506
Political Economy of the Middle East
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Andrea Teti

Pre-requisite(s): x

Note(s): This course will not run in 2009/10.

This course examines the political economy of the contemporary Middle East, covering amongst others several topical issues at domestic, regional, and international levels, from the problems of development (e.g. (neo)colonialism), to the political economy of oil, to the connection between water scarcity and security. The course systematically analyses the link between economic choices (e.g. liberalisation) and their and political consequences (e.g. democratisation, radicalism).

1 lecture + 1 tutorial per week.

60% in-course assessment, 40% exam.

IR5508
Latin America: security conditions and challenges
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Mervyn Bain and Andrea Oelsner

Pre-requisite(s):

The course will study international, domestic, cultural and ideological factors in contemporary Latin America, and pose analytical, empirical and ethical questions relevant to the region. The course aims to introduce students to the nuances and complexities involved in studying security issues in contemporary Latin America, but also politics and international relations in the region. Its main themes will include narco-terrorism, ‘failed’ and ‘rogue states,’ dependency theory, liberation theology, revolutions, populism and neopopulism, democratisation, debt and globalisation, regional integration, the region’s international relations, and the study of the Latin American subregions.

1 two hour lecture/seminar and 2 hour tutorial/seminar per week

40% in-course assessment, 60% exam

IR5509
Critical and Human Security
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Prof Mustapha K. Pasha

Pre-requisite(s): This course is available only to students at level 5 (Pg5).

This course examines critical approaches to security in International Relations in the 21st century. It draws from recent cross-disciplinary interventions in the social sciences to extend the theoretical and substantive range of a largely contested meaning of ‘security’ beyond its conventional state-centric focus. It provides students vital analytical tools to explore state-of-the-art scholarship in contemporary world politics. The first part of the course addresses the limits of militarized notions of power and state security developed in critical approaches including Human Security; Gender, Postcolonial theory; Securitization; Poststructuralism; and International Political Sociology. The second part of the course will be devoted to substantive questions, including environmental security; Homeland Security and the ‘War on Terrorism’; the politics of surveillance; migration and border security; informational warfare; and health security. The course is designed as a seminar with the aim of fostering class participation and discussion.

1 two-hour seminar.

A final exam 40%; Continuous assessment (60%) will take the form of a 7000 word research paper, and a class presentation.

IR5901
Dissertation in International Relations
CREDIT POINTS 60

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Ritu Vij

Pre-requisite(s): 120 credits in the necessary courses in the MSc programme

Note(s): A performance level in the four taught courses will be imposed before students can proceed to the dissertation.

Students who meet the necessary requirements proceed to the dissertation. Students select a topic in consultation with the degree convenor that explores in depth some aspect(s) of International Relations. The dissertation is designed to allow students to extend an interest in some aspect of the degree and to have experience in formulating, designing and conducting their own social science research investigation. Students complete a 12-15,000 word dissertation under supervision.

Independent research under supervision

12-15,000 word dissertation worth 100%

IR5902
Dissertation (MLitt in Latin American Studies)
CREDIT POINTS 60

Course Co-ordinator: Mervyn Bain

Pre-requisite(s): 120 credits in the necessary courses in the MLitt in Latin American Studies programme

Note(s): This course will not run in 2010/11.

Students who meet the necessary requirements proceed to the 12-15,000 word dissertation, which is a compulsory part of the MLitt in Latin American Studies. It enables students to pursue in-depth knowledge and original research on a topic of the culture, society, politics or international relations of Latin America, subject to approval of the teaching staff. The dissertation is designed to allow students to extend an interest in some aspect of the degree and to have experience in formulating, designing and conducting their own research investigation. Students will be prepared for this by the core and elective courses of the MLitt programme, by one 2-hour seminar of dissertation-writing training, and by individual supervision.

One two-hour workshop in second half-session, followed by independent research under individual supervision.

Dissertation, 12-15,000 words: 100%

PI5001
Strategic Studies
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Mr J Wyllie

Pre-requisite(s): 2nd class honours degree

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): None

This module will consider the contribution of strategy, as the mechanism for the application of power and force, to the pursuit of the national security objectives of states in the international system. Topics will include concepts of strategy, the changing nature of war, concepts of military power, theories of deterrence, limited war, intervention, arms control and disarmament, unconventional war and terrorism, and crisis management. Economic force as a strategic instrument will also be examined.

12 weeks of 3 hours (2 x 1 1/2 hour classes). 12 Lecture / discussion classes and 12 seminars where essays form the basis of class debate.

1 in-class 1500 word approx. essay (20%); 1 team presentation (20%); 1 three-hour examination (60%)

PI5014
Themes in Latin America
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Andrea Oelsner and Nerea Arruti

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): This course will not run in 2010/11

This course provides an advanced introduction to a variety of topics in Latin American Studies, which will enable students to choose an elective course for the second semester of the MLitt, and also lay the groundwork for those elective courses as well as for the Dissertation that they will write subsequently. The course will introduce a variety of disciplinary approaches, including those of anthropology, history, literary and cultural studies, and politics and international relations, and through these will illuminate a wide range of issues in Latin America. It will also be available for students of other MLitt and MRes programmes, pending approval of the course coordinator.

The course will be divided into two parts:
• An overview of politics and international relations in Latin America
• An overview of cultural and social issues in Latin America

1 two-hour seminar per week

2 Essays (50%).

PI5021
Qualitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Lynne Bennie

Pre-requisite(s):

This course will introduce students to a range of qualitative methods (such as participant observation, qualitative interviewing, and the use of focus groups) and to the secondary analysis of archived qualitative data. The focus will be practical, with students completing mini-projects on which they will give written and oral presentations. The emphasis will be on the research process, from project design to analysis and presentation with methodological issues raised in the context of researchable questions. Issues of reliability, representativeness and validity, and the potential for combining methods will be addressed. As with the other courses, students will be encouraged to link practical assignments to their proposed dissertation topic.

One two hour session per week

One presentation 20%, one peer-reviewed presentation 20%, research report on the use of qualitative methods in own research 60%

PI5022
Theories and Issues in Political Science and IR
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Heinz Brandenburg

Pre-requisite(s):

Preparation of MRes students for the conduct of original research also requires them to gain an understanding of the state of the discipline. This is a conceptual course; it introduces to and elaborates on core approaches, concepts and themes in international relations and politics. It offers an integrated overview of the joint disciplines of political science and international relations, covering mainstream approaches and dominant debates as well as key methodological controversies surrounding the study of domestic and international politics. The course covers themes such as rationality, political institutions, political behaviour, justice, democratisation and globalisation, as well as theoretical debates surrounding core paradigms of the discipline such as rational choice, poststructuralism, realism, etc.

One three hour session per week

100% in-course assessment (Literature review essay 10%, 4,000 word essay 80%)

PI5023
Strategic Intelligence
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: J. H. Wyllie

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to level 5 students.

The course will begin with an analysis and explanation of the nature and dominant characteristics of strategic intelligence, and the functioning of the intelligence cycle. Various categories of intelligence, such as battlefield, counter-intelligence, and economic intelligence, and their relationships to strategic intelligence, will be scrutinised. The place of strategic intelligence in the writings of famous strategic thinkers such as Sun Tzu, Thucydides, Kant, Clausewitz, Liddell Hart, and Kilcullen will be examined. There will also be an assessment of the roles of governmental intelligence agencies in high strategic policy-making. For elucidation of the above, a range of case studies over the past one hundred years will be considered: the outbreak of World War I; events in World War II such as the Nazi attack on the Soviet Union and the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor; the Cuban Missile Crisis during the Cold War, the Arab – Israeli ‘6-Day War’, 1967; and the decision to intervene in Iraq in 2003.

2 x 2hrs: lectures and seminars (to be arranged) per week.

60% examination; 40% essay (4,000 words max).

PI5502
Global Security Issues
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Mr J Wyllie

Pre-requisite(s): 2nd class honours degree

This module will analyse the nature and condition of extra-European security since the end of the Cold War, and consider likely developments. The adaptation of the security policies of the United States and Russia are major elements of the module as are the related, salient security issues in the world's two most volatile regions, the Middle East and North East Asia. There will also be consideration of security issues in sub-Saharan Africa and in South Asia

12 weeks of 3 hours (2 x 1 1/2 hour classes). 12 Lecture / discussion classes and 12 seminars where essays form the basis of class debate.

1 in-class 1500 word approx. essay (20%); 1 team presentation (20%); 1 three-hour examination (60%).

PI5514
Quantitative Methods in Political Science and International Relations
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Patrick Bernhagen

Pre-requisite(s): x

Co-requisite(s): x

Note(s): For students studying an MRes in Political Studies

To understand political institutions, attitudes, behaviours and policy outcomes requires the application of concepts and theories to factual information about the political world. This course is an introduction to that endeavour and takes the student from the process of data collection, to measurement issues, and finally to analysis and the interpretation of results. It presents a range of quantitative methods and is designed as a practical introduction to research methods in politics and international relations.

Three one-hour sessions per week.

100% in-course assessment (weekly problem sets, 40%; replication project, 60%).

PI5515
Political Research Seminar
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Heinz Brandenburg

Pre-requisite(s): SL5006 Research Skills (15 credits)

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): None

The content and format is to discuss the various papers written and presented by the participants within the postgraduate seminar group using techniques developed previously on other courses within the MRes in Political Research programme. The seminar is convened by the MRes programme co-ordinator.

One two-hour seminar per week.

Assessment is by means of a written seminar paper submitted in advance which is then presented to the postgraduate seminar group.

PI5516
RESEARCH DESIGN, DATA AND PRESENTATION
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Heinz Brandenburg

Pre-requisite(s):

A full understanding of the methodological basis of inquiry into political processes, institutions, behaviour and attitudes is a necessary preparation for MRes students. To this end, the course introduces to a range of important topics with regard to research design: philosophy of science, the nature, value and problems associated with comparative political science, the logic of scientific inference, the interrelationship between theories and methods, the scientific standards of falsifiability, validity, reliability and replicability, and the basic principles of data collection. In addition, the course will familiarise students with a range of available data types (e.g. from surveys, texts, oral accounts, documents or experiments), the selection criteria involved in choosing data for hypothesis testing, as well as general problems of operationalisation, measurement and credibility of data sources.

One two-hour sessions per week

Seminar presentation critique of 2000 words 30%, research design paper 4000 words 70%.

PI5520
Strategic Nuclear Doctrine
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Mr J. H. Wyllie

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to level 5 students.

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): None

The course will trace and illustrate the salient strategic, technological and political developments that have influenced the evolution of strategic nuclear doctrine since the end of the Cold War. The nuclear posture and strategy of each of the world's nuclear powers will be analysed on a case by case basis in order to identify the specific role nuclear weapons play in ensuring or furthering the security interests of these actors. The course will also consider the extent to which specific nuclear doctrines impact or even determine the relationships between states at the international level.

2 x 2 hours: lectures and seminars per week.

60% examination; 40% essay.

PI5901
Dissertation in Strategic Studies
CREDIT POINTS 60

Course Co-ordinator: Mr Jim Wyllie.

Pre-requisite(s):

Students who meet the necessary requirements may proceed to the dissertation element of the programme. The dissertation comprises a 12 – 15, 000 word analysis of a topic related to the Strategic Studies curriculum and agreed with the programme director. The dissertation allows students to bring knowledge and insights from all the taught units to bear on a single topic. The dissertation will attest to thorough and well-organised research, including primary material where appropriate. It will identify and measure central themes and elements of the topic within a coherent framework. The supervisor’s duties comprise assistance in the selection of the topic and general guidance towards sources, arguments, and the overall structure and presentation of the research, but the dissertation is essentially an exercise in student initiative and self-management.

Students complete a 12 - 15,000 word dissertation under supervision.

PI5904
Dissertation in Political Research
CREDIT POINTS 60

Course Co-ordinator: Professor Neil Mitchell

Pre-requisite(s): 120 credits in the necessary courses in the MRes programme.

Note(s): Students who meet the necessary requirements proceed to the dissertation. The dissertation follows the form of an exploratory project. Students clarify their research questions, review appropriate literatures, present and defend their research strategies and designs, analyse their preliminary findings and produce a written dissertation. Topics are selected by the student in consultation with their supervisor. For students intending to continue to doctorate, the dissertation will be preparation for their doctoral research: a frame within which to clarify the research question, summarise the literature review, summarise and defend the intended data collection methods, give details of necessary access and the like.

Students complete a 12,000 word dissertation under supervision.

12,000 word dissertation worth 100%