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GG5024
Valuation and Appraisal
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Aileen Stockdale

Pre-requisite(s):

The aim of this course is to develop an understanding of valuation and investment principles. Quantative techniques relevant to the appraisal and analysis of land and property are taught. Specific topics studied are: the economic and investment context for the creation of value in land and property markets; the purpose of land and property appraisal; the financial principles underlying appraisal methods; different appraisal methods; and valuation trends and explanations in specific property markets.

Assessment: 1 multiple-choice class test (20%), 1 essay/report (20%); 1 two-hour written examination.

GG5025
Agricultural and Planning Law
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr John Loder

Pre-requisite(s):

This course focuses on local, national and European policy developments affecting rural development in its wider complex. A key aspect is the inclusion of practical case studies and the application of knowledge and skills to ‘real-life’ circumstances. It includes a series of day field visits (within Scotland) and a week-long European visit. Recent visits have been to Spain, Portugal and the Czech Republic. Working either individually or in groups, students complete practical projects intended to integrate the various components of the degree programme.

Assessment: 3 reports (100%)

GG5030
Rural and Environmental Policy
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Aileen Stockdale

Pre-requisite(s):

This course focuses on local, national and European policy and legislative development affecting rural land use, businesses and communities. It critically evaluates a wide range of policies that have shaped today’s countryside. Specific reference is given to the influences upon, nature of, and impacts of these policies, with future policy directions considered. Policies and legislation relevant to agriculture; forestry; conservation; recreation; diversification; planning and development; economic and social restructuring are studied.

Assessment: 1 essay/report (40%); 1 two-hour written examination.

GG5031
Land and Environmental Economics
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Ben Davies

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Note(s): none

To understand and apply economic principles to contemporary issues concerned with land and wildlife management, nature conservation and the environment.

One two-hour lecture per week, 3 two-hour seminars and directed reading.

One three hour exam (60%) and one essay (40%)

GG5033
Planning Theory and Practice
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: J Scott Kelman

Pre-requisite(s):

This course introduces and explores the academic discipline and the profession of spatial planning, with particular emphasis on the planning system's role within the wider context of sustainable development. Topics covered range from the theoretical rationales behind public-sector intervention in land use to practical guides to how the planning system works today.

1 two-hour lecture per week, supported by WebCT.

60% exam and 40% continuous assessment.

GG5036
Planning, Land & Environmental Law
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: William Walton

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): None

This course covers the following areas of law relevant to spatial planning and rural / urban surveying:

1. the institutional context and the preparation of development plans; (week 1)
2. development management, enforcement and judicial review; (week 2)
3. compulsory purchase and compensation; (week 3)
4. the control of pollution and the protection of flora and fauna; (week 4)
5. the ownership and transfer of land; (weeks 5-8)
6. contract and professional negligence; (week 9)
7. agricultural holdings legislation; (weeks 10-12)
8. the protection of the built environment; (week 11)
9. mock planning inquiry (week 12)


All students (MLE, UPRE and RPEM) receive lectures in topics 1-6. MLE students also receive lectures in topic 7 (agricultural holdings legislation). RPEM students receive lectures in the first half of topic 7 in week 10. Both UPRE and RPEM students receive instruction in topic 9 (the protection of the built environment). All UPRE and RPEM students sit the mock planning inquiry. MLE students do an essay from a choice provided.

1 two-hour lecture per week

60% exam and 40% continuous assessment (MLE – essay 3,000 words: UPRE / RPEM – participation in a mock planning inquiry).

GG5038
Fundamentals of Geographical Information Systems, and Spatial Analysis
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: David Green

Pre-requisite(s): None

Topics covered in the course will include:

• Fundamentals of Geographic Data; coordinates, map projections
• Geographical Information Systems and Utility Software
• Fundamentals of Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
• Fundamentals of using a GIS: navigation, data storage, data retrieval and querying, buffering, overlay analysis, mapping
• Extending the Functionality of GIS: using scripts, extensions and utilities
• Advanced Spatial Data Analysis
• GIS and Modelling
• Online GIS, Information Systems and Decision Support Systems

GG5039
Fundamentals of Cartography, Map Design and Geovisualisation
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: David Green

Pre-requisite(s): None

- Definition of geovisualisation and its role in communication
- An historical overview of geovisualisation
- Explore the importance of geovisualisation as part of human information processing
- The progressive enhancement of geovisualisation for both presentation and analysis through the application of new methods and technologies
- Personal experience of using software offering geovisualisation tools and facilities
- Applications of geovisualisation in worked examples and in a variety of subject fields.

GG5040
Fundamentals of Image Acquisition, Analysis and Processing
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: David Green

Pre-requisite(s): None

Topics covered in the course will include -

• The Earth-centred coordinate system of spatial referencing, and national variants
• The range of sensor platforms used in image acquisition from air and space
• The physical basis of Remote Sensing (RS) using electro-magnetic radiation
• Characteristics of imaging sensors operating in the visible, infrared and microwave spectral regions
• Examples of measuring and mapping the Earth from aerial platforms
• The development of Earth observation satellites since about 1970
• Basics of visual analysis/classification of images
• Principles of digital image processing
• Applications of digital image processing of aerial and satellite images

GG5041
Environmental Policy Making
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Antonio Ioris, Brian Clark, Helmut Geist

Pre-requisite(s): be registered in a MSc level programme

The course aims to provide an introduction to the contemporary environmental debate and the evolution of environmental management. It will also consider international environmental treaties, environmental diplomacy and North-South relations. In addition, the course will examine concepts and experiences of political ecology, and will development an understanding of the barriers to achieve environmental justice and public participation.
Course content:
The activities during the course will be organised in three thematic areas:
1. Environmental policy-making: history, evolution and achievements
2. Political ecology: theory, practice and issues of scale
3. International relations and environmental diplomacy

Lectures and workshops (2 hours of class contact per week).

Individual essay (60%); individual oral presentation (40%).

GG5042
Theories and Practices of International Development
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Rowan Ellis

Pre-requisite(s):

1. Introduction: What is development?
(a) Measuring development
(b) Governing development
(c) Critical development studies

2. Histories of development
(a) Colonialism and uneven development
(b) Decolonization and development

3. Theories of development
(a) Modernization theory
(b) Dependency theory
(c) Neoliveralism and development
(d) Grassroots development and sustainable development

4. Practices of development
(a) International aid
(b) Debt and development
(c) Participatory development

5. Outcomes of development
(a) Case study: Green revolution
(b) Case study: The development industry/development practitioners
(c) Case study: The world social forum

2 hours of lectures/seminars weekly, including short films, presentation of real-world interactive case studies, in-class activities and student-led discussion.

Student-led discussion (20%); individual essay (40%); final exam (40%).

GG5047
Forestry and Game Management
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: TBC

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students registered for GE PGT programmes or by the discretion of the course coordinator.

Forestry
Introduction to UK forestry
The forest estate and policy
National classification of woodlands
Natural regeneration
Silvicultural systems
Forest menstruation and harvesting
Certification

Game Management
Introduction to game management
Pheasants, Partridge, Grouse
Deer species
Fishings
Raptor and vermin control

One 2 hour lecture per week.
3 half day field trips for Forestry

Game management site visits delivered as part of the induction field trip weekend.

1 three hour exam (60%)
A group forestry project on measuring and valuing a woodland: (40%)

GG5048
Agricultural Principles and Practice
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: TBC

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students registered for GE PGT programmes or by the discretion of the course coordinator

Week 13;
Introduction to course, objectives, learning outcomes, teaching methods, farm visit procedures etc.
Introduction to agriculture, the management of the countryside, its economic significance geographical spread and social significance. Discussions about farm types, and different system, the importance of mixed farming and sustainable agriculture.
Land classification and soils.
Week 14:
Assessing a farm, developing an understanding of what makes a farm work and understandng the farmers objectives.
Agricultural Support mechanisms, what is available, how they work and where the system is heading.
Week 15:
Beef Production and sheep production, and introduction to beef and sheep management systems, discussing the annual cycle of operations, terminology, econommic significance, and gross margins.
Week 16:
Arable production, including potaotes, discussing the annual cycle of operations, terminology, economic significance, and gross margins.
Week 17:
Dairy production, pigs and poultry, discussing the annual cycle of operations, terminology, economic significance, and gross margins.
Week 18:
Environmental management and a holistic approach to land management.
Agricultural law

2 x two hour lectures per week (day to be arranged) and six-one day site visits to farms reflecting the range of agricultural opeations found around Aberdeen

1 three hour examination (60%)
Continuous assessment: (40%) Farm report (1200 words) Environmental report (2000 words) Gross margins accounts

GG5506
Research Design & Methods
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: David Green

Pre-requisite(s): None

The first half of the course will deal with generic issues of relevance to the design and execution of any research projects, such as: philosophical issues in research; objectivity; literature searching; identification of data requirements; selection of appropriate methodological strategies (qualitative and quantitative); ethical issues. The second half will concentrate more specifically on matters relevant to a project involving geospatial technologies, such as: advanced geospatial literature searching; primary and secondary geospatial data sources; sampling methods for image-classification testing; evaluating results of geospatial data processing ; drawing conclusions; presentation (written and graphical).

GG5514
Rural Business Management
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Watson Bell

Pre-requisite(s): GG5035

Co-requisite(s): GG5525

Note(s): none

This course covers the preparation and analysis of financial accounts and forward financial planning. It covers basic taxation and the granting of wayleaves and servitudes. Field visits examine the financial interactions of Estate enterprises and the development of a specific area of an estate eg diversification. The learning outcomes are:

• To understand the inputs and outputs in both physical and financial terms for the main landed activities on rural estates;
• To be able to set management objectives.
• To be able to devise management plans;
• To understand business accounts and make decisions based on their analysis.
• To understand the basic legal details of landlord/tenant relations;
• To appreciate the basis upon which the income of a small business is assessed and the implications of capital taxation legislation;
• To be able to prepare sound financial plans for both individual enterprises and the rural business as a whole.
• To understand staff management including current employee legislation;

One two-hour lecture per week, one 2 hour workshop per week.

One two hour exam (40%) and three assignments (60%)

GG5516
Research Methods
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mark Beecroft

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Note(s): none

This course will enable the student to appreciate the nature and purpose of academic research, will provide a systematic route through the initial stages in the preparation of a feasible research proposal and identify the investigative, evaluative and research management skills essential for the successful completion of a dissertation.

Lectures (8 x one hour) , workshops (4 x one hour) and computing laboratory classes (3 x two hours)

100% continuous assessment

GG5523
Design, Development & Regeneration
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Scott Kelman

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): None

This course aims to introduce students to the principles of making successful, sustainable places through good design, economically viable development and socially inclusive regeneration. In brief the course covers: design principles and theory and the related applications in practice; the techniques, toolkits and methods used to undertake place and space appraisals; the concepts of design quality and place identity; access and equality issues; the implications of poor design; alternative approaches to design problems; the real estate development process; rural regeneration; urban regeneration and land reclamation; place marketing and the role of image.

1 two-hour lecture per week, supported by WebCT.

100% continuous assessment (40% urban design project and 60% essay)

GG5526
Spatial Planning Strategies
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr William Walton

Pre-requisite(s): x

Co-requisite(s): x

Note(s): x

x

4x2 Lectures; 6x2 project workshops and a mock planning enquiry

100% continuous

GG5527
Planning Methods and Plan Making
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Ms Gill Wall

Pre-requisite(s): x

The aim of the course is to provide students with a knowledge and understanding of the methods and techniques employed by spatial planners to scrutinise development proposals and generate spatial development plans.

Topics will include:

Development plan preparation approaches; survey-analysis-plan; projections and forecasts; scenario writing; Delphi techniques; sources of information; population, housing and employment projections; strategic and project-based environmental assessments; retail and employment impact assessments; land availability studies; development plan generation; preparation of precognitions; mock planning inquiry.

1 two-hour lecture per week; 1 four-hour field visit; 4 two-hour workshops; 1 three-hour mock planning inquiry.

1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment (50%).

GG5529
Place Identity and Culture (incorporates European Urban Field Study)
CREDIT POINTS 20

Course Co-ordinator: Professor William Jv Neill

Pre-requisite(s): x

Review of theoretical writing on the role of place in the constitution of cultural identity followed by case studies of the spatiality of identity formation in a range of concrete city settings. An emphasis is placed on the role of urban planning, real estate interests and place branding and marketing. the course will culminate in a field study to a major European capital with the opportunity to analyse place identity and marketing tensions and the role of urban planning in mediating this.

12 lectures (1 2-hour lecture per week), 3 seminars and one European Field study.

50% individual assignment; 50% group field assignment.

GG5530
Spatial Planning & the Energy Sector
CREDIT POINTS 7.5

Course Co-ordinator: Mr Tom Hardle

Pre-requisite(s): x

Co-requisite(s): x

Note(s): x

x

x

x

GG5531
Applied Image Analysis and Processing
CREDIT POINTS 10

Course Co-ordinator: David Green

Pre-requisite(s): None

Initially, there will be two class sessions to provide guidance on approaches to independent learning and project preparation. Thereafter, students will investigate the agreed theme independently or as groups, meeting formally for one hour every other week to discuss progress with staff and to seek further guidance where appropriate.

At the end of the course students will:

• Be conversant with the current literature and web-based information sources related to GPS, airborne and satellite remote sensing systems, GIS and Geographic Visualisation
• Recognise the inter-dependence of geospatial technologies
• Have developed time management and report writing skills
• Be competent in summarising a report for oral presentation and the preparation of a poster display

GG5532
Current Issues and Applications of the Geospatial Technologies
CREDIT POINTS 10

Course Co-ordinator: David Green

Pre-requisite(s): None

Guest lectures from a pool of potential contributors (drawn from active researchers from across the College of Physical Sciences , from university and external research institutes and from commercial companies currently using GIS and other geospatial technologies) will present a programme of lecture and seminar presentations to reflect current activity and new developments in the application of geospatial technologies. These will be supplemented by student presentations. Examples of possible themes presented by Guest speakers include:

- Coastal change detection and measurement by time series analysis of Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) as one possible indicator of sea level change.
- GIS modelling and visualisation of the potential impact of strategies for the sitting of wind-farms
- Monitoring geological fault movements using inteferometric radar images
- Mapping ‘ potential for flooding' through integrated use of hyperspectral imaging, LiDAR scanning and GIS (and its relevance for the insurance industry)
- GIS modelling and visualisation of alternative coastal engineering scenarios
- Satellite detection and monitoring of volcanic eruptions
- Developing a methodology for automated land-cover change detection by digital image processing
- Ground based LiDAR imaging for measuring and monitoring landform erosion in areas of high relief
- The role of GIS in oilfield data management
- Sub-sea imaging technology for detecting and mapping sea-floor features
- The role of GIS and RS in the identification, measurement and visualisation of landscape change
- The value of satellite RS and GIS in ‘frontier exploration' for oil and gas
- GIS mapping for wheelchair users

GG5533
Applied GIS Project Planning and Spatial Analysis
CREDIT POINTS 10

Course Co-ordinator: David Green

Pre-requisite(s): None

Initially, two lecture sessions will be given on ‘Project Planning', based on real examples of successful project bids. ‘Advice' sessions will be provided for one hour in alternate weeks. The project allocations will generally relate to the disciplinary backgrounds of the students and will be set up in the style of an ‘invitation' to tender' for a commercial or consultancy research contract.

At the end of the course students will:

• Have developed inter-personal skills and acquired the ability to work in groups to achieve a desired end goal
• Recognise what ‘data', ‘tools' and personnel are required to carry out a project
• Be able to ‘cost' the elements of a project and set out a timetable of work
• Be able to write a detailed technical specification for the execution of a project
• Be able to give an oral presentation of the project methodology

GG5534
Comparative International Planning
CREDIT POINTS 20

Course Co-ordinator: William Walton

Pre-requisite(s):

The identification and exploration of issues relevant to contemporary spatial planning practice in the USA, Canada, Australia and Europe; the institutional arrangements for planning in these jurisdictions; the approaches in these jurisdictions to such matters as urban growth and decline, the impact of cultural differences on urban planning and so on; introduction to field visit; preliminary research investigations; formulation of research question; field data collection, analysis and conclusions; presentation of findings, results and conclusions.

1 two-hour seminar per week.

One 1500 word essay (30%); group seminar presentation (20%); pre-field visit group presentation (15%); field visit group presentation (15%); individual 1000 word field visit report (20%).

GG5535
International Perspectives on Environmental Management and Regional Development
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Antonio Ioris, Tim Mighall

Pre-requisite(s): be registered in a MSc level programme

This is a field based course. Prior to the field course students will prepare for the trip through lectures on key topics and by designing a group research project to be undertaken in the field. These activities include completing an individual literature review to develop an understanding of the development and environmental issues facing the chosen country, and the design of a group research project on a relevant topic (aims, objectives, methodological approach, methods, risk and ethical assessment).

The second phase will involve a fieldtrip to a foreign country to complete the group research project. This will be achieved by the collection of primary and secondary data. The group will orally present their initial findings at the end of the field course and by way of an individual written report (in the style of an academic paper with around 5,000 words, excluding appendices and bibliographic references) on return to the university.

Supervised group work (2 hours/week) and residential field course in a foreign country (9 days).

Literature review and research methodology (prior to departure) - 20%;
Pre-trip viva (prior to departure) - 20%;
Group presentation (during the fieldtrip) - 30%;
Final individual report and reflexive assessment (after the fieldtrip) - 30%.

GG5537
Rural Policy in Practice
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Marsaili Aspinall

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Note(s): none

The objective of this course is to understand, develop and evaluate strategies, plans and policies in relation to the management of rural properties in the UK. Students will develop an understanding how rural land management is operationalised in the UK.

Four two-hour lectures, 4 two-hour seminars and directed reading.

100% continuous assessment.
Foreign field trip , duration 7-10 days.

GG5538
Valuation for Rural Surveyors
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: TBC

Pre-requisite(s): New courses Agricultural Principles and Practice and Forestry and Game Management

Co-requisite(s): GG5514 Rural Business Management

Course Content

  • An introduction to the property markets in the UK incorporating the concept of value, the distinguishing features of these markets and the different types of legal interests in property.

  • An examination of the principle methods of property valuation including the need to assimilate and analyse all relevant evidence in a forensic fashion.

  • An understanding of the practical application of property valuations including the workings of the RICS Valuation Standards.

12 two hour lectures on a day to be confirmed
8 hours of site visits

Exam (60%)
Continuous assessment (40%) split (20%) introductory valuation and (20%) applied rural valuation.

GG5543
Research Strategies & Professional Development in Land Economy & Geography
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Lorna Philip

Pre-requisite(s):

x

x

GG5802
Environmental Impact Assessment
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Professor Brian Clark, Geography

Pre-requisite(s):

The course introduces the concept of Environmental Impact Assessment, emphasising the procedures, methods, techniques and application of this evaluation/planning tool. Greatest emphasis will be placed on the utility of EIA as an aid to rational decision making and the course focuses on both developed and developing countries. The course will be wide ranging and partly based on students’ interests, but will cover the following aspects of EIA:
· Procedural and administrative aspects of EIA, including selection of projects for EIA;
· Production of EISs and EIAs and public participation;
· Methods used to structure and organise EIA, i.e. matrices, networks, quantitative methods, the concept of adaptive environmental assessment;
· Specific techniques which can be used to assess environmental impacts such as air, water, noise, ecological effects, economic and social impacts, risk and visual impacts;
· The role of monitoring and impact auditing in EIA;
· EIA of plant and policies;
· EIA and international agencies, viz. World Bank, DfID, etc.

The course will be based on lectures, seminars and papers prepared by the students, and project work which will include both desk studies, practical work and simulation exercises.

Assessment will be by a written paper, seminar presentation and evaluation of project work and the simulation exercise.

GG5808
Dissertation in Applied Geospatial Technology
CREDIT POINTS 75

Course Co-ordinator: David Green

Pre-requisite(s): x

x

x

GG5809
Project in Applied Geospatial Technology
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: David Green

Pre-requisite(s): x

x

x

GG5904/GG5905
Case Study/Dissertation
CREDIT POINTS 60

Course Co-ordinator: MLE programme director/SRD Programme Director

Pre-requisite(s): none

Co-requisite(s): none

Note(s): none

The aim of the dissertation/case study is to provide students with the opportunity to select, design, conduct and report a detailed investigation of a topic of their own choice or, in the context of work placement, a topic completed in partnership with an external agency. The topic will reflect the philosophy of the SRD or MLE degree programme and must be formally approved by the Department.

1 x 15-20,000 word dissertation (MLE/MSc SRD) or 10-12,000 word case studies (PGDipLE/PGDipSRD)

Dissertation/Case study 100%