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AT50/5514
Practical Anthropology and Archaeology
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Robert Wishart and Alex King

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s): Compulsory for students taking MSc. in Materialising the Past

Note(s): Students will be able to interrogate the physical contexts in which anthropology and archaeology work best together. They will learn the foundations of a research technique as applied to materials. They will be able to deploy and adapt conceptual approaches as tools for analysing particular situations. They will begin to develop their own interests in hands on research and learn how to apply theory and method to them.

This core course for the Anthropology and Archaeology M.Sc. is tailored around individual student interest in working with research materials. A plan will be developed between the course coordinators and each student to gain access to a research activity such as an excavation, a laboratory, or a museum/archive. After spending at least 20 hours at this activity, the student will write an assessed 3000 word report outlining what they did, the outcomes of the practicum and its application to anthropology and archaeology.

20 hours practicum, 3 hours supervision.

100% coursework. 3000 word report

AT50/5515
Synergies and Debates in Anthropology and Archaeology
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Robert Wishart and Alex King

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): Students will be able to interrogate the contexts in which anthropology and archaeology work best together. They will learn the foundations and theory of the synergies between anthropology and archaeology and where the come to points of strong debate. They will learn particular conceptual and methodological approaches that arise out of shared interests between anthropology and archaeology. They will be able to deploy and adapt conceptual approaches as tools for analysing particular situations. They will learn how to read anthropological and archaeological works in depth, and to translate the understandings gained from that reading for different audiences and different purposes. They will understand how and why the other courses in the programme contribute to their specific skills in anthropology and archaeology. They will begin to develop their own interests and learn how to apply theory and method to them.

This core course for the Materialising the Past M.Sc. will be structured around several themes that introduce subjects of common interest to anthropology and archaeology while also providing a space to explore the dialogue between these sibling disciplines over their interpretation, usefulness and how, or even if, the disciplines should engage with them.

Lecture themes include the history of anthropology and archaeology as sibling disciplines; anthropological and archaeological notions of time and progress; socio-cultural evolution and its present day applications; ecology and adaptation; culture change and colonialism; material culture and enskillment; museums and public engagement; museums and the politics of collections (repatriation); socio-linguistics, orality and unpreserved forms of sociality; anthropology and archaeology in indigenous contexts; rescue archaeology and cultural resource management; the politics of the archaeological record.

Each one hour lecture will be followed by a one hour student lead seminar where the students can develop their interests and receive instant feedback from their cohort and the course coordinators on their research ideas.

1 hour lecture, 1 hour student interest driven seminar per week

100% coursework, student will be assessed on one 6000 word essay on a subject that they will choose and develop with guidance over the duration of the course.

AT50/5516
Advanced Survey in the Anthropology of Myth
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Alexander King

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): Students will be able to identify a myth and explain how a particular story qualifies as a myth in its cultural contexts vis a vis other genres of stories. Students will learn a wide range of anthropological approaches to myth. They will come to understand the breadth of global variation in the qualities of different myths in different cultures and the breadth of theoretical schools in the analysis of myths. Students will learn how myths operate as performances in the context of their telling. Students will learn how to interpret myths in the social and cultural context of their setting. Students will learn how myths can be transformed as they move across cultures.

The anthropology of myth highlights the social and cultural contexts of myths as sacred narratives. This course draws upon a wide range of cultures, from ancient Greeks, Mesopotamia and China to contemporary Africa, Asia, and the indigenous peoples of the Americas. Boasian approaches to Native American myths as oral literature and windows into cultural values can be contrasted with the functionalist theories of Tylor and Malinowski. This course emphasizes the performative qualities of myth, drawing upon the work by Dell Hymes, Albert Lord, Dennis Tedlock, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Edmund Leach, Ruth Finnegan, Peter Gow and others. The course concludes with a discussion of the relevance of myth in contemporary society, such as found in the fiction by Tolkien or novels by Native American writers like Alexie, Silko, or Welch.

1 hour lecture, 1 hour tutorial per week

100% One 6000 word essay

AT50/5520
Anthropology of the North
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Robert Wishart

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): The course will teach students to identify the main principles and issues in the anthropological theorising and ethnography of the North and apply them to specific research problems. The course will communicate the ways in which anthropological approaches to northern peoples’ lifeways relate to intellectual and theoretical debates in Anthropology and related disciplines. Students will demonstrate an advanced ability to critically interpret northernist anthropological sources and evaluate their relation to broader social and ideological processes and to theoretical principles and debates in anthropology. Students will demonstrate a critical understanding of basic and contemporary anthropological concepts, principles, and terminology related to the Anthropology of the North. Students will understand the process through which anthropological knowledge of a study area develops and changes. Students will learn to critically analyse popular descriptions of the North and the people who live there that they encounter in their day-to-day lives and relate them to broader anthropological thinking. The course will promote student study skills in writing analytical, critical essays that draw upon more diverse and advanced ethnographic sources. Students will learn to formulate and express coherent and reasoned arguments in class discussions about the Anthropology of the North. The course will engage students in the preparation of material for directing and participating in seminar discussions. This course will promote self-directed learning by encouraging the students to identify and apply sources relevant to the Anthropology of the North.

This study of the Anthropology of the North will take advantage of lectures already being taught in the anthropology department at the 4th year level, but it will contain separate advanced seminars for the MSc students.
Each one hour lecture will be followed by a one hour student lead seminar where the students can develop their interests and receive instant feedback from their cohort and the course coordinators on their ideas.

1 hour lecture, 1 hour seminar per week

100% coursework - One 6,000 essay

AT50/5521
Morality and Belief in Islam
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Johan Rasanayagam

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): Intellectual skills: • Students will gain an understanding of Islam as a system of morality and belief • Students will acquire the skills to formulate and clearly express arguments. • Students will learn the use of reading lists, library and internet-based information sources to assemble, review and evaluate materials related to the topics covered. • Students will learn to write analytically and with critical insight, to correctly cite sources. • Students will learn to present work in small group settings, contribute to group discussions and sharpen presentational abilities. Transferable skills: • Preparing written work to an appropriate standard using word processing facilities. • Preparing and giving oral presentations. • Participation in discussions. • Managing resources of time study materials

This course examines how Muslims engage with Islam as a system of morality and belief. It discusses the debates within Muslim societies about what constitutes ‘real’ Islam and how Muslims should conduct themselves. How does belief in Islam as a unitary, transcendent Truth, which is universal to all humanity, relate to the diverse manner in which Islam in actually lived in practice throughout the world? An important issue which will be explored in the course is that of subjectivity and selfhood within a Muslim context, and how we might approach the topic of belief itself.

One 1 hour lecture and one 1 hour seminar per week

100% in-course assessment - 6,000 word essay

AT5003/AT5503
Concepts and approaches for Design Anthropology
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr James Leach/Prof Tim Ingold

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s): Compulsory for students taking Design Anthropology MSc

This is the course for the Design Anthropology Masters programme. The course will begin with orientation and familiarisation with the emerging field of Design Anthropology by reviewing the emerging literature around anthropological practice in corporations, with designers and artists, and in other non-academic situations.

Through practical exercises, students will learn to analyse and understand the context in which they will operate as Design Anthropologists. Students will learn how to position themselves as Design Anthropologists, and introduce them to various theoretical and practical tools for making anthropological understandings available to non-specialist audiences.

We will consider how Design Anthropology differs from Applied and Development Anthropological approaches, the content will familiarise students with developments on Aberdeen Design Anthropology - specifically the theory and application of phenomenological approaches to perception and the aesthetics of everyday life and how these relate to processes of design and making. Ethnographic practice as interested engagement will be covered in theoretical and practical exercises, and the application of theoretical tools distilled from academic anthropological practice will be covered. To this end, material on concepts such as relational approaches to understanding the constitution of objects will be taught, as well as theories that can be adapted to the practical analysis of common situations (such as gift/commodity distinctions).

Finally, students will be guided through the process of reading complex ethnographic and theoretical texts with the specific purpose of extracting understandings and ideas from those texts that can then be tailored to the needs of specific users/collaborators. In this manner, the course aims of giving students a practical set of tools, a method of understanding and adapting to non-academic working environments, and of being able to tailor anthropological theory and materials to be useful and useable by specified and identified interlocutors/collaborators will be achieved.

1 hour lecture and 1 hour individual supervision

100% coursework

AT5004/AT5504
Anthropology, Archaeology, Art and Architecture for Design Anthropology
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Jo Vergunst/Prof Tim Ingold

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s): Concepts and Approaches in Design Anthropology

This course will explore the connections between anthropology, archaeology, art and architecture, conceived as alternative approaches to understanding and shaping how people perceive and relate to their surroundings, in currents of space, time, and movement. We will focus on issues of perception, design and construction, on the generation and reproduction of form in natural and 'built' environments, on the relation between bodily movements and live time/space, on the significance of craft and skill, on activities, of depiction and description, and on impacts of old and new technologies. We will explore these issues through readings, practical exercises and site visits.

2 hour lecture, 1 hour individual supervision

100% coursework

AT5005/AT5505
Anthropological Approaches to Knowledge Production for Design Anthropology
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr James Leach/ Dr Maggie Bolton

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s): Concepts and Approaches in Design Anthropology

This course will explore some of the history, meanings, and uses of 'Intellectual Property', a concept of increasing importance in anthropology and beyond. The series of lectures and seminars will provide students with theoretical tools to approach contemporary issues of innovation, ownership, and the value placed upon knowledge. We ask, 'How is knowledge produced?; What are the connections people make between it and other items that can be owned?; How do precedents from one realm of production and ownership appear relevant in another?' The lectures will cover literature from Classical Political Economy, Political Philosophy, Economic Anthropology, and international precedents for attributing authorship and cultural rights to persons and groups. Part of the course will be dedicated to literature within Science and Technology Studies, and studies of Biodivesity, and Genetics, and of software production. The underlying theme is to expose some of the consequences of liberal individualism for the structure and politics on contemporary social realities.

1 hour lecture and 1 hour individual supervision per week.

100% coursework

AT5006/AT5506
Anthropological Theory for Design Anthropology
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Arnar Arnarson/Dr James Leach

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s): Concepts and Approaches in Design Anthropology

This course explores theoretical issues and key debates in contemporary anthropology. We begin by establishing a broad overview of theoretical developments in anthropology. We will then review how the central concepts of culture and society were rethought in anthropology during the 1980s. Following on from this, we ask the questions that underlie the discussions during the course: how can anthropology proceed if the targets of its investigation can no longer be understood as objective entities? How can anthropology proceed if the anthropologist themeselves is inevitably implicated in and part of those very targets? To look for possible answers, the course examines current anthropological interest in power and history, political economy and phenomenology, experience, embodiment and practice. While the intent is theoretical these issues and debates will be explored largely through ethnographic writing on such subjects as emotions and the body, genetics and reproduction, personhood and politics, death, memory and forgetting. Emphasis will be placed on encouraging students to apply theoretical insights from anthropology to their everyday lives and the world around them.

1 hour lecture and 1 hour individual supervision per week.

100% coursework.

AT5007/AT5507
Materials, Technology and Power in the Andean Region
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Maggie Bolton/Dr James Leach

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s): Concepts and Approaches in Design Anthropology

The theoretical focus of this course is on technology and uses of materials and the way that these intersect with questions of political power. The course will cover symbolic and Marxist approaches to technological choices; theories of embodiment, skills and learning; theories of inscription; and approaches to technological change, innovation and expertise from science studies (e.g. through actor-network theory). The theoretical concerns are addressed by introducing the anthropology of the Andean region - with the rationale that approaches to working with materials in this region differed markedly from those of Europe until (and also beyond) the Spanish conquest of the 16th century. Different areas of technology and material culture are addressed through examining both historical material and contemporary ethnographic studies - from pre-Hispanic metallurgy to contemporary agricultural development and the role of scientifically trained experts in bringing about changes in practices. Four main technological areas are addressed in the course: mining and metallurgy; fibres and Andean textuality; medicine and the body and working the land.

1 hour lecture and 1 hour individual supervision per week.

100% coursework

AT5008
Religion, Power and Belief
CREDIT POINTS

Course Co-ordinator: Johan Rasanayagam

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): Students will critically investigate the concepts of religion and belief, and the articulation of religion and power

Students will interrogate the concept of religion, explore contrasting theories of religion and ritual, discuss the interface of religion, power and violence, and critically explore the concept of belief. This course will take a seminar form, led by students and facilitated by a member of staff.

One 2 hour seminar per week

5000 word essay (100% in-course assessment)

AT5009
Oral Traditions in the Modern World
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Alex King and Nancy Wachowich

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): Students will learn the complex variety and forms of narrative. They will gain an understanding the key theoretical positions of importance in the anthropology of oral traditions. Students will use insights from the literature to analyse critically an original text, either written or an oral form.

From charter myths and epics to reminiscences and eyewitiness accounts, stories are an integral part of talk and the sociality of everyday life. Oral traditions have a social life situated in the nexus of relationships among persons. The anthropology of oral traditions focuses on historical oral narratives and the interplay between orality and textuality in contemporary social life. Analysis proceeds from the assumption that form and content are intertwined in the production of meaning and that an attention to performance and medium is important to understanding the message. This course will be of interest to anthropology students, as well as to students in linguistics and history.

1 one hour lecture and 1 one hour tutorial per week.

100% coursework - 6000 word essay

AT5010/5510
Anthropology and Landscape
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Andrew Whitehouse

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): At the end of the course, students should be able to: • demonstrate understanding of major theoretical approaches to landscape in anthropology. • produce coherent and reasoned arguments in written work and class discussions about topics related to the landscape in anthropology. • demonstrate a critical understanding of empirical research related to the ethnography of landscape. • show an understanding of the importance of a comparative and critical approach to studying landscape. • effectively use the library and other information sources to research relevant theoretical and empirical material. • prepare material for leading and participating in seminar discussions. • work with fellow students in organising seminars and in commenting on each other’s work. • engage in self-directed learning, assisted by some formal guidance. • use a reflexive approach in their own work, involving balanced self-criticism and intellectual progression.

The aim of the course is to address the relevance of landscape to method and theory in anthropology. It will allow students to draw upon analytical skills and knowledge gained in previous courses, and develop an anthropological approach to landscape in ethnography and human-environment relations. The course will creatively explore the tensions and overlaps between landscape as physical landform, as scenery, and as the site of human activities and journeys. Developing advanced themes in environmental anthropology, we will discuss the central place of landscape in ethnography. Topics covered include movement, memory and time, phenomenology and aesthetics. The course will draw on a wide range of materials including recent ethnographic and theoretical work in anthropology, and also texts from geography, environmental history and nature writing. Students will also be encouraged to consider art and photography that deals with landscape.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 one-hour tutorial per week, to be arranged.

In-course assessment 100%.

AT5012/5512
Religion and the Secular
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Johan Rasanayagam

Pre-requisite(s): Available to students in level 5 only.

This course will interrogate the utility of the category of “religion” and will look at the broadest politics of the category of “religion” and how it becomes distinguished from the “secular”. How have these categories emerged through the history of ideas and political institutions?

One 2-hour seminar every 2 weeks.

One 3,000 word essay.

AT5013
Understanding People and Environment
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Andrew Whitehouse

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s): Compulsory course for students taking the MSc People and Environment

Note(s): Students will gain: • An appreciation of the history, themes and debates within environmental anthropology. • An appreciation of how anthropology can contribute in distinctive ways to an understanding of environmental issues and questions and also how it can intersect with other disciplines. • A grounding in core areas of expertise in environmental and ecological anthropology at Aberdeen. • An understanding of methodological and theoretical approaches in environmental anthropology. • An opportunity to read a wide range of texts in the field in depth and to develop an appreciation of how to scrutinise, adapt and communicate the ideas contained within. • A chance to develop their own interests within the field in a coordinated manner that intersects with staff interests within the department. • An opportunity to develop general anthropological and academic skills in reading, interpretation, oral presentation and writing.

This core course for the MSc in People and Environment will be structured around four sections. The first section will provide an introduction to ecological and environmental anthropology, exploring key issues, theories and debates in the history of the field. The remaining three sections will focus on three broad sub-themes: environmental perception, human-animal relations and anthropology and conservation. These are areas of particular research strength at Aberdeen but between them they also draw on a wide range of approaches and themes, including phenomenology, political ecology, indigenous rights, applied anthropology and aesthetics.

One hour seminar and one hour student-led tutorial per week; occasional short field trips within northeast Scotland (sites will be selected to be accessible to students with disabilities, if necessary).

100% - Three 2000 word essays

AT5017/5517
ROADS: MOBILITY, MOVEMENT, MIGRATION
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Tatiana Argounova-Low

Pre-requisite(s): Admission to postgraduate degree in the College of Arts and Social Sciences

Note(s): At the end of the course the students should be able to: - demonstrate a critical understanding of empirical research related to study of roads, movement, mobility, and migration; - understand major theoretical approaches to the anthropology of roads; - produce coherent and reasoned arguments in written work and class discussions about topics related to the anthropology of roads and subsequent themes.

This course explores the phenomenon of roads and focuses on the relationship between roads and other anthropological concepts, such as landscape, environment, narrative, knowledge and memory, gradually building up towards theoretical conceptualization of roads. The course will deal with the themes of mobility and migration, topical issues in contemporary world. The course will mainly rely on ethnographic material from the North, including Scotland.

One hour lecture and one hour tutorial per week.

Continuous assessment: one 6000 word essay.

AT5018/5518
THE NORTH AMERICAN PLAINS: REPRESENTATIONS, POLITICS AND SOCIAL LIFE
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Alison Brown

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): At the end of the course, students should be able to: • demonstrate understanding of major theoretical approaches in the anthropology of representation. • produce coherent and reasoned arguments in written work and class discussions about topics related to the anthropology of representation. • demonstrate a critical understanding of empirical research related to the ethnography of Plains First Nations. • show an understanding of the importance of a comparative and critical approach to considering aspects of cultural representation. • effectively use the library and other information sources such as museums, websites, popular media and archives to research relevant theoretical and empirical material. • prepare material for leading and participating in seminar discussions. • work with fellow students in organising seminars and in commenting on each other’s work. • engage in self-directed learning, assisted by some formal guidance. • use a reflexive approach in their own work, involving balanced self-criticism and intellectual progression.

The interplay between cultural representation, the construction of identity and their influence on contemporary social relationships have long been of interest to anthropologists and cultural historians. The Native peoples of the Plains region of North America have arguably been subjected to more cultural stereotyping than any other aboriginal group; popular representations include warriors and princesses, the ‘stoic Indian’, and the ‘ecological Indian’. Through a study of contemporary issues affecting their daily lives, the lectures and seminars will consider how the tensions created by such imaginaries are negotiated by Native peoples on the Plains today as well as how they feed into broader anthropological concerns relating to the politics of representation. Themes to be covered include the impact of stereotypes; sovereignty; the negotiation of self and other; the social and political implications of defining ‘Indianness’; new economic developments and cultural tourism.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 one-hour tutorial per week, to be arranged.

100% continuous assessment - an essay of 6000 words.

AT5024
Philosophy and Methods of Research in Social Anthropology 1,
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Johan Rasanayagam

Pre-requisite(s): To be inserted

Co-requisite(s): To be inserted

Note(s): This course is to be taken along with AT5501

These courses introduce key issues of philosophy, theory and method raised by research in the related fields of social anthropology, ethnology and cultural history,

To be inserted

To be inserted

AT5508
Curating an Exhibition
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Mr Neil Curtis

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to registered postgraduate students

This course will afford students the opportunity to work with Aberdeen's extensive museum archival and rare book collections to design and execute an exhibition with both a physical and virtual presence.

One design brief (30%); one group exhibition (30%); one individual portfolio, including a 3,500 word reflexive essay (40%).

AT5509
Reading Environmental Ethnography
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Andrew Whitehouse

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s): Compulsory for students taking MSc People and Environment

Note(s): Students will gain: • A growing appreciation of the history, themes and debates within environmental anthropology through the reading, comparison and discussion of book-length ethnographic texts. • An understanding of how anthropology can contribute in distinctive ways to the study of environmental issues and questions through examining a series of in-depth ethnographic case studies. • A greater insight into how to conduct research in environmental anthropology, how to write ethnography and how to read and compare different anthropological texts.

The course will be based around students reading approximately six contemporary environmental ethnographies. Texts will be selected to cover a range of issues, styles and approaches and students will read each successively as the course progresses. A seminar will be held every fortnight to allow students to discuss each work in depth together with a tutor. Students will be assessed through a comparative essay that discusses a number of the texts featured in the course.

Six two-hour seminars to take place fortnightly during the twelve-week semester.

100% coursework: Two 2000 word essays (50% each)

AT5511
Dissertation Preparation Seminar
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Martin Mills

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): By the end of the course students should be able to: Identify a research question Identify and review relevant literature Critically read and respond to texts Develop a structure for the dissertation Understand conventions for referencing, footnoting and compiling bibliographies Understand the process of researching and writing a dissertation

Though a series of seminars, students will learn how to identify a suitable question for their dissertation, and identify and review the relevant literature in libraries and through on-line databases. The course will discuss how dissertations might be structured, how conceptual frames or theory might relate to ethnography, as well as conventions for footnoting, referencing and bibliographies

Six 2 hour tutorials over the 12 week semester, one every two weeks.

100% continual assessment:

AT5519
Culture and Society in Latin America
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Maggie Bolton

Pre-requisite(s):

This course provides a more in-depth coverage of issues of culture and society in Latin America than the MSc core course Themes in Latin American Studies, although the course will also be available for students of other MSc and MRes programmes, pending approval of the course coordinator. The course will cover a range of topics from the anthropology of indigenous and non-indigenous societies to colonial and modern history and contemporary literature and film. This will also introduce students to a wide range of approaches to Latin American Studies, especially those of anthropology, of history, and of literary and cultural studies.

1 two-hour seminar per week

Continuous assessment: 100%: 2 x 3,000 word essays (50% each)

AT5524
Philosophy and Methods of Research in Social Anthropology 2
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Johan Rasanayagam

Pre-requisite(s): To be inserted

Co-requisite(s): To be inserted

Note(s): This course must be taken along with AT5001.

These courses introduce key issues of philosophy, theory and method raised by research in the related fields of social anthropology, ethnology and cultural history.

To be inserted

To be inserted

AT5525
Dissertation in Social Anthropology
CREDIT POINTS 60

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Johan Rasanayagam

Pre-requisite(s): To be inserted

Co-requisite(s): To be inserted

Note(s): To be inserted

The dissertation is a substantial piece of independent research and writing. In it, students will demonstrate the extent to which they have achieved the critical learning outcomes from their year of research training.

To be inserted

To be inserted

AT5902
Dissertation in People and Environment
CREDIT POINTS 60

Course Co-ordinator: Andrew Whitehouse

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s): Compulsory for students on MSc People and Environment

Note(s): Students should: - demonstrate a grasp of the major anthropological approaches to environmental anthropology. - demonstrate a capacity to assess critically these approaches. - demonstrate the skills of critical reasoning and argument in an extended piece of writing. - conduct independent research and report on it.

Independent research leading to a 10-12,000 word dissertation

Independent research project
The students will be prepared for this in a separate course entitled ‘Dissertation project seminar’. Supervision will also be provided by an appropriate member of staff.

100% coursework – 12,000 word thesis.

AT5903
Dissertation in Materialising the Past
CREDIT POINTS 60

Course Co-ordinator: Robert Wishart and Alex King

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s): Compulsory course for students taking MSc. in Materialising the Past

Note(s): Students should: - demonstrate a grasp of the major approaches in anthropology and archaeology. - demonstrate a capacity to assess critically these approaches - demonstrate the skills of critical reasoning and argument in an extended piece of writing - conduct independent research and report on it.

Independent research leading to a 10-12,000 word dissertation

Independent research project
The students will be prepared for this in a separate course entitled ‘Dissertation project seminar’.

100% coursework – 12,000 word thesis.

AT5905
Dissertation: Latin American Studies
CREDIT POINTS 60

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Maggie Bolton

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students registered on the MSc in Latin American Studies

Students who meet the necessary requirements proceed to the 12-15,000 word dissertation, which is a compulsory part of the MSc in Latin American Studies. It enables students to pursue in-depth knowledge and original research on a topic of the culture, society, politics or international relations of Latin America, subject to approval of the teaching staff. The dissertation is designed to allow students to extend an interest in some aspect of the degree and to have experience in formulating, designing and conducting their own research investigation. Students will be prepared for this by the core and elective courses of the MSc programme, by one 2-hour seminar of dissertation-writing training, and by individual supervision.

One two-hour workshop in second half-session, followed by independent research under individual supervision.

Dissertation, 12-15,000 words: 100%

AT5906
Scottish Training in Anthropological Research
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Jo Vergunst

Pre-requisite(s): Only available to students taking the MRes in Social Anthropology, Ethnology and Cultural History.

Students will take part in a series of lectures, seminars and workshops related to anthropological methods and disciplinary practice. Specific topics will vary from year to year but may include participant observation, fieldnotes, documentary research and the ethics and politics of anthropological research.

One full time working week, from Monday to Friday.

Full participation at the STAR event, including presentation of group work. Assessment will be marked on a pass/fail basis.

AT5907
Dissertation in Anthropology of Religion
CREDIT POINTS 60

Course Co-ordinator: Johan Rasanayagam

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): Students will make use of the knowledge and critical understanding gained through participation in the MSc Religion and Politics to identify a research topic for the dissertation, conduct library based research, and produce an analysis in the form of a 10-12,000 word dissertation

Independent research leading to a 10-12,000 word dissertation

Independent research project
The students will be prepared for this in a separate course entitled ‘Dissertation project seminar’.

10-12,000 word dissertation

AT59DA
Dissertation in Design Anthropology
CREDIT POINTS 60

Course Co-ordinator: Dr James Leach/Prof Tim Ingold

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s): Compulsory for students taking MSc in Design Anthropology

This is a core component of the Design Anthropology Masters programme. Undertaking an extended guided project that incorporates reflection on the approaches and tools utilised will constitute the content of the Dissertation. Practical study may take the form of internships in relevant organisations or corporations and placements in companies or other institutions. It could also be based on sustained engagement with people involved in specific making processes outside industry or corporations. The dissertation will be a report on the context in which the project work has been undertaken, and the form that the application of Anthropological approaches look, a reflexive consideration of interventions into that context, and a discussion of the theoretical, methodological and practical elements of the project. Sustained consideration of the usefulness of various tools and concepts through this exercise will equip students with skills in assessing and articulating the value and effect (or otherwise) of approaches in Design anthropology to specific circumstances while putting into practice the anthropological approaches taught elsewhere on the MSc. While it is hoped students will come to the course with ideas and contacts with relevant sites for this module, there will be possibilities available drawing on the networks of staff for internships and placements of various kinds.

By weekly supervision

12,000 word thesis.