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ZOOLOGY

For Level 1 and 2 courses, please refer to entries under Biology

> Level 3
ZO 3010
ANIMAL EVOLUTION AND BIODIVERSITY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Piertney

Pre-requisite(s): BI 2002

Note(s): (i) This course extends over 6 weeks only. (ii) Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Origin of life, DNA structure; historical perspective of development of evolutionary theory; the principles of biodiversity; microevolution, molecular markers; speciation; fossil record; phylogenetics; key evolutionary transitions; human evolution; co-evolution, creationism; Darwininism.

5 lectures per week, 6 hours of tutorials/practicals/seminars per week. total contact time approximately 58 hours.

6 week course (thread 1, weeks 12-17).

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%), and in-course assessment based upon essay (1,000 words), practical write-up and oral presentation (50%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%), this may contain material from both the practical and lecture components of the course.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

A strong emphasis will be made throughout the course on informal verbal feedback during seminar and workshop sessions.

Each student will receive individual feedback and a mark for each task. Feedback will be provided as written comments. Groups will also be given generic feedback.

ZO 3304
MARINE ECOLOGY AND ECOSYSTEMS
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Yule

Pre-requisite(s): BI 2001

Note(s): This course extends over six weeks only; the course is available only to students in Programme Year 3.

The course covers main aspects of ocean circulation; regional upwelling; chemical and physical properties of seawater; the ecology of phytoplankton, zooplankton, benthos, nekton, mammals, birds, rocky shores, littoral zone, kelp forest and deep sea; the coral reef, polar and North Sea ecosystems; and selected topics in marine management.

1 five-hour lectures and 1 six-hour practical each week; course runs for six weeks (weeks 18-23, thread 1); total class contact approximately 66 hours.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (60%), assessment of laboratory work (40%).

Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

A strong emphasis will be made throughout the course on informal verbal feedback during practical sessions.

Each student will receive individual feedback and a mark for each task. Feedback will be provided as written comments.

ZO 3305
ANIMAL POPULATION ECOLOGY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr G Pierce, Dr L De Raad

Pre-requisite(s): BI 2001

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): This course extends over six weeks; it is available only to students in year 3 of their programme.

This course deals with the basic ecological theory and modelling approaches required to study population dynamics, especially those populations which have importance for conservation consideration, management or exploitation. The formal tools used to describe population change in continuous and fragmented populations are explored. The complexity of reproductive strategies found in the animal kingdom as well as their implication for harvesting of species are presented.

2 two-hour lectures per week, 2 one-hour lectures per week, 5 three-hour practicals over 6 weeks. Total contact hours approximately 51.

To pass this course, a pass must be achieved in BOTH the theory exam and the in-course assessment.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination for all candidates (50%) and in-course assessment (50%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%); this may contain material from both the practical and lecture components of the course.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

A strong emphasis will be made throughout the course on informal verbal feedback during practical sessions.

Each student will receive individual feedback and a mark for each task. Feedback will be provided as written comments. Groups will also be given generic feedback.

ZO 3509
ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Professor D Hazlerigg

Pre-requisite(s): BI 2508

This course covers the physiological mechanisms animals have evolved to meet the demands of survival. Basic physiological principles will be revisited to facilitate the understanding of complex processes such as Neuronal Function, Hormonal Signalling, Osmoregulation, Gas Exchange, Sensory Systems and Metabolism.

3 two-hour lectures and 1 four-hour practical per week, approximately 60 hour contact time.

6 week course (thread one, weeks 30-35).

To pass this course, a pass must be achieved in both the theory exam and the in-course assessment.
1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (60%) and in-course assessment (40%).

Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (100%), this may contain material from both the practical and lecture components of the course.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

A strong emphasis will be made throughout the course on informal verbal feedback during seminar and workshop sessions.

Each student will receive individual feedback and a mark for each task. Feedback will be provided as written comments. Groups will also be given generic feedback.

ZO 3510
ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mrs C Dennis

Pre-requisite(s): BI 1005 or other students may be admitted on to the course at the discretion of the course coordinator.

Co-requisite(s): None

This course introduces the biological basis for animal behaviour, considering how behaviour contributes to survival, the proximate mechanisms of behaviours, behavioural development and evolution. Examples of topics covered include: the genetic basis of behaviour, motivation and cognition, maturation and learning, individual decisions, social behaviour, predator/prey interactions and communication.

Lectures, seminars and practicals; total contact time about 42 hours.

6 week course (thread 2, weeks 30-35).

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (60%); continuous assessment (40%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

A strong emphasis will be made throughout the course on informal verbal feedback during seminar and workshop sessions.

Each student will receive individual feedback and a mark for each task. Feedback will be provided as written comments. Groups will also be given generic feedback.

ZO 3810
BIOLOGY AND CONTROL OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Bowman

Pre-requisite(s): BI 2008; other students may be admitted onto the course with permission from the Course Co-ordinator.

The aim of this course is to provide a thorough overview of the principles of infectious diseases affecting man and animals. Lectures will cover principles of infection, epidemiology, zoonoses, control strategies, notifiable diseases and their containment, and vector borne disease. Lectures rely heavily on specific examples of the major groups of infectious organisms that, in part, reflect the interests of the team.

36 one-hour lectures; 5 six-hour practicals; 1 four-hour poster session; total contact hours approx 70 hours.

6 week course (weeks 36-44, thread 2).

To pass this course, a pass must be achieved in BOTH the theory exam and the in-course assessment.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); in-course assessment (50%). In-course assessment comprises group work and poster presentation (20%) and 3 practical write-ups (30%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%), this may contain material from both the practical and lecture components of the course.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

A strong emphasis will be made throughout the course on informal verbal feedback during practical and poster sessions.

Each student will receive individual feedback and a mark for each task. Feedback will be provided as written comments. Groups will also be given generic feedback.

ZO 3811
APPLIED MARINE BIOLOGY, FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURE
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Yule

Pre-requisite(s): BI 2001 or BI 2008 OR BI 25Z2 or MR 1010; other students may be admitted to the course at the discretion of the Course Coordinator.

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): (i) This course extends over 6 weeks only. (ii) Available only to students in programme year 3 or above.

Fish and fisheries conservation, ocean acidification, invasive species and aqauculture are among the topics discussed in this course.

6 one-hour lectures and six hours of practicals/field-sessions/seminars per week. total contact time about 72 hours.

6 week course (thread 1, weeks 36-44).

To pass this course, a pass must be achieved in BOTH the theory exam and the in-course assessment.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (60%) and in-course assessment (40%). In course assessment is made up of a practical report (2000 words excluding tables and figures), two computer based tests, one case study presentation and one literature based assignment.

Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (100%), this may contain material from both the practical and lecture components of the course.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

A strong emphasis will be made throughout the course on informal verbal feedback during seminar and workshop sessions.

Each student will receive individual feedback and a mark for each task. Feedback will be provided as written comments. Groups will also be given generic feedback.

 

> Level 4

PLEASE NOTE: Resit: (for Honours students only): Candidates achieving a CAS mark of 6-8 may be awarded compensatory level 1 credit. Candidates achieving a CAS mark of less than 6 will be required to submit themselves for re-assessment and should contact the Course Co-ordinator for further details.

ZO 4526
ADVANCES IN VECTOR BIOLOGY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Bowman

Pre-requisite(s): BI 25Z1 or ZO 3810

Note(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4.

Introductory lectures of 1-2 hours will each describe a current research topic in vector biology. Example topics are disease transmission, physiology, ecology and resistance of vectors including molecular approaches. Lectures will draw attention to 3-5 recent research articles, which are given to the students for reading and are discussed the following week in tutorial format.

Thread II: 6 weeks - 2 two-hour lectures; 1 hour tutorial per week.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (100%).

ZO 4536
ABYSSAL AND HADAL ENVIRONMENTS
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Jamieson

Pre-requisite(s): At Second year: Either Ocean Biology (BI 25Z2) or Invertebrate Life (BI 25Z1) At Third year: Marine Ecology and Ecosystems (ZO 3304)

Note(s): This course will make an ideal companion to Marine Benthic Ecology (ZO 4808).

The abyssal and hadal environments is one of the last habitats on earth to be explored. If this valuable resource is to be protected and conserved for the benefit of future generations, a better understanding of the deepest parts of the ocean is urgently needed. The hadal environment, defined as depths greater than 6000m and extending to 10,989m at the deepest point on the earth, represents the most extreme conditions for life.

This course will describe the history of the discovery of the true depth of the oceans from early circumnavigations of the globe to detailed description of the hadal regions during the 1960s. The unique submersibles, manned and unmanned, that have descended to these depths will be described and the stories of their expeditions presented and set into context. The only human visitors to the Challenger deep were Jacques Piccard and Don Walsh on board the bathyscapth, Trieste in 1960.

The hadal regions are mainly confined to deep ocean trenches where earth's crust is descending beneath the continents. This requires an understanding of continental drift, plate tectonics and dynamics of the earth. Oceanography of abyssal and hadal regions will be reviewed together with what is known of its physical characteristics. Deep sea research began with the assertion by Forbes in 1843 that no life could exist at depths greater 600m. It has since been discovered that whilst the abundance of life does decrease with depth animals do survive at 6000m and there are documented examples of hadal fauna. Finally the course will conclude with a section on conservation and the vulnerability of the hadal zone to pollution, as the ultimate sink for wastes produced by man. Where appropriate case studies will illustrate key concepts by example. Relevant theory, applications and sampling/data analysis approaches will be obtained from lectures, discussions and primary journal article readings.

Thread I: 3 two-hour lectures per week (on campus), 1 all day practical (per course, not per week) at Oceanlab, Newburgh.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour examination (80%), 1 continuous assessment (20%).

ZO 4539
ADVANCED BEHAVIOURAL ECOLOGY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mrs C Dennis

Pre-requisite(s): ZO 3510

Note(s): Only available to students in level 4 Zoology, Biology and other Biological Sciences. Pre-requisite should be strictly adhered to.

Behavioural ecology provides a framework for exploring relationships between animal behaviour, ecology and evolution. Specifically, behavioural ecology is concerned with questions about how patterns of behaviour contribute to an animal's chance of survival and reproductive success. Topics covered include, investigating optimality and game theory, ecological and evolutionary aspects of mate choice, mating systems and sexual conflict and the role of behaviour in management and conservation. Lectures will be supplemented by student seminars in key topics, student-centred learning, discussion groups and debates based on current journal articles. An important practical component of the course will be centred upon the exploration of theoretical concepts using computer-based modelling approach.

Thread I: 2 two-hour lectures, 1 two-hour seminar plus 1 three-hour practical/seminar/private study session per week.

1st Attempt: Examination (70%) and continuous assessment (30%).

ZO 4540
SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF MARINE RESOURCES
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr T Marshall

Pre-requisite(s): ZO 3304

This course aims to explore science and management issues related to the sustainable exploitation and conservation of marine resources. Successful management of these resources depends on having good understanding of the ecology of these species, as well as an ability to place management issues in the broader context of society. This course has three key objectives: 1) to draw upon recent research that aims to improve our understanding of the ecology of commercial fisheries, deep sea fish species and marine mammals; 2) to explore how quantitative data are incorporated into the management frameworks that have been developed to manage direct and indirect effects of commercial fisheries and other human activities; and 3) to encourage students to work in small groups to investigate a current topic relating to marine resource management, and to report back your findings in the final weeks of the course.

Thread II: 6 week course - 3 two-hour lecture sessions/week plus 1 two-hour practical/week.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment (100%).

ZO 4541
WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT: CONCEPTS AND PRACTICE
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr L De Raad

Pre-requisite(s): ZO 3305

Co-requisite(s): None.

The course deals with the concepts and practice of wildlife population conservation and management, including methods to estimate population size, survival rates of animal populations and how to use this information to assess the viability of populations with matrix projection models. The course will consider how to manage wildlife populations in partnership with human communities that view them as a resource (such as red deer), as potential competitors (such as grey seals), as pest species (American mink) or as species in need of conservation (such as water voles, capercaillie).

3 two-hour lectures/seminars per week and 6 three-hour practicals. Total contact time about 54 hours.

Six week course (Thread 1, weeks 30-35).

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (100%). One management proposal (50%) and one talk (50%).

Resit: Resubmission of management proposal (100%).

ZO 4802
PARASITOLOGY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr J M Sternberg

Pre-requisite(s): ZO 3810

This course will address modern aspects of parasitology, primarily in the context of human parasitic disease. Tropical parasitisms will be discussed in depth along with current control programmes such as that of the WHO. The course will then consider recent developments and future prospects in parasite diagnosis, chemotherapy and vaccine design.

Thread I (slot A & F): 6 week course - 3 two-hour lectures per week.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (100%).

ZO 4805
BIOETHICS
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Delibegovic

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): Available to level 4 students.

This course will introduce ethical thinking into the pursuit of science, particularly relating to biological issues. The nature of science, its role in culture and society, ethics and ethical debate will be considered. The view will be taken that scientists cannot distance themselves from the wider implications of their work. Lectures, discussions, case studies, will be used to debate current ethical topics, such as the ethics of animal research, xenotransplantion, genetic screening, etc.

Thread I: 6 week course - 2 two-hour lectures; 1 three-hour seminar/tutorial/practical per week.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (100%).

ZO 4809
BIOLOGICAL TIMING
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Professor D Hazlerigg

Pre-requisite(s): ZO 3509

Note(s): Only available to students in level 4 Zoology, Biology and other Biological Sciences, Pre-requisite should be strictly adhered to.

The ability to control the timing of physiology and behaviour is a fundamental attribute of life, ranging from the cyanobacteria to man. Organisms have evolved complex mechanisms to take advantage of temporal cues present in the environment to synchronise endogenous "biological clocks". The course will explore the fundamental nature of these clocks, and their impact on the lives of animals and humans. Topics considered will include the evolutionary ecology of circadian rhythms, tidal rhythms, the role of biological timing in migration and seasonal rhythms, and the importance of circadian rhythms in humans - including the problems posed by the "24-h society".

Following initial revision & introductory lectures, the course wil take a strong "case studies" approach, with student led discussions of current literature. Data acquisition and handling aspects of research into biological rhythms will be covered through practicals - with an opportunity for students to monitor and analyse their own activity rhythms during the course.

Thread II: 2 two-hour seminar sessions plus 1 two-hour discussion / practical session per week.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (100%).

ZO 4810
MOLECULAR ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr C S Jones & Dr L R Noble

Pre-requisite(s): BI 2002, ZO 3010

Note(s): Only available to students in Level 4 of Zoology, Biology & other Biological Sciences. Pre-requisites should be strictly adhered to.

Molecular ecology can be broadly defined as the application of molecular genetic markers to problems in ecology and evolution, encompassing studies on the genetic relationships among individuals, populations and species. As such the field covers population and evolutionary genetics, behavioural ecology, conservation biology, and genetic exchange within the natural environment. The course will introduce the genetic markers, the techniques and analysis commonly used in this field. Emphasis will be placed upon molecular data acquisition, and statistical or phylogenetic analyses to address questions related to population structure, genetic diversity, speciation, and historical factors that have shaped the distribution and abundance of organisms. Additional topics covered will include molecular clocks, the significance of the use of mitochondrial DNA for phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies, and molecular applications for behavioural ecology (paternity and relatedness). An intuitive grasp of the relevant theory, applications and analytical approaches will be obtained through lectures, tutorial style discussions, and case studies via debates and workshops, as well as primary journal article readings.

Thread II: 6 weeks. 2 two-hour lectures; 1 two-three hour seminar/tutorial per week.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written exam (80%) and continuous assessment (20%).

ZO 4811
SUSTAINABLE AQUACULTURE
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr S A M Martin

Pre-requisite(s): None

Over view of aquaculture and its global contribution marine food production
a. Nutrition: fish feeds, fish meal fish oil, global shortage, how to over come this with new diets (plant protein oils)
b. Health of aquacultured animals: diseases, vaccination methods of controlling health, parasitic diseases interaction wild and farmed
c. Selective breeding / genetics/ effects on wild populations - future genomic applications to aquaculture
d. Environmental impacts - ecological impacts of aquaculture, diversity and approaches to reduce environmental loading. Future directions of aquaculture.

There will be lectures at the start of each unit of the course. There will be use of primary literature which will also be discussed at tutorial discussion groups. There will study time during weeks 5 and 6 at the end of which an essay and seminar will be presented.

1st Attempt: Examination (50%); 1 two-hour continuous assessment (50%) (seminar 20% essay 30%).

ZO 4812
MARINE BENTHIC ECOLOGY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Professor F Kuepper and Professor U Witte

Pre-requisite(s): ZO 3304

Note(s): This is a six week course.

The course provides an ecological understanding of marine benthic systems and illustrates their importance in the functioning of the ecosystem at local and global scales. The course is designed for marine ecologists who wish to apply ecological theory and concepts within a marine context and wish to specialise in the benthos. Appropriate examples from a variety of habitats will be used to illustrate broader ecological concepts.

4 two-hour sessions per week, a mixture of lectures, discussions and tutorials; total class contact time about 48 hours.

Six week course (weeks 36-44, thread 1).

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written exam (80%) and continuous assessment (20%). The continuous assessment is composed of a proposal report 3,000 words (15%) and an oral presentation (5%).

Resit: 1 three-hour written exam (100%).