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SOCIOLOGY

> Level 1
SO 1005
INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY I
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Bone

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Sociology is the study of human social groups. It particularly focuses on modern societies, analyzing how they work and how the major social institutions in them (such as religion, the media, government and the economy) operate. The course presents students with a general introduction to the unique manner in which sociologists seek to understand contemporary societies. Students are presented with current and classical approaches to understanding the social processes that underlie self-construction, group formation and social interaction, within urbanizing and globalizing social contexts.

1 one-hour lecture per week (with additional guest lectures as appropriate) and associate tutorial teaching.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (60%); continuous assessment (40%). 

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Class presentations plus class quizzes.

Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

SO 1507
INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY II
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A McKinnon

Pre-requisite(s): None.

The course introduces students to macro-sociology, which analyzes the ways that people's lives today are shaped by large-scale forces and developments. Students are introduced to the particular ways in which sociologists understand social forces in the contemporary global environment. Substantive topics may include areas such as the media, religion, social surveillance and education.

1 one-hour lecture per week (with additional guest lectures as appropriate) and associated tutorial teaching.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (60%); continuous assessment (40%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Class presentations plus class quizzes.

Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

 

> Level 2
SO 2004
STUDYING SOCIAL LIFE 1
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr D Gimlin

Pre-requisite(s): Both level 1 Sociology courses.

Note(s): This course is worth 15 credits. There is also an expanded 30 credit version which runs simultaneously. Students may only take either the 15 credit or 30 credit course, not both. Intending Honours students must take at least 45 credit points from Sociology level 2 courses.

This course follows on from the level 1 Sociology courses. It familiarises students with various issues in micro-sociology, the study of small-scale social arrangements and experiences of everyday life. Particular focus is on the sociological analysis of embodiment, personhood and the life course, looking at the social and historical reasons for contemporary understandings of each. The substantive topics covered may include such areas as the body, sex and gender; the emotions; health and illness; food and feeding; individualism and the individual; childhood and ageing.

2 one-hour lectures per week, every second week, and 1 one-hour tutorial per week, every second week.

Lectures for this version of the course are to be timetabled at the same times and venue(s) as those for the 30 credit version.

1st Attempt: 1 one-hour written examination (60%); continuous assessment (40%).

Resit: 1 one-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

SO 2005
STUDYING SOCIAL LIFE 1 (EXTENDED)
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr D Gimlin

Pre-requisite(s): Both level 1 Sociology courses

Note(s): This is the extended, 30 credit version of the 15 credit version of this course. It is particularly for intending Sociology Honours students, but is open to all students with the necessary pre-requisites. Students may only take either the 15 credit or 30 credit course, not both. Intending Honours students must take at least 45 credit points from Sociology level 2 courses.

This course follows on from the level 1 Sociology courses. It familiarises students with various issues in micro-sociology, the study of small-scale social arrangements and experiences of everyday life. Particular focus is on the sociological analysis of embodiment, personhood and the life course, looking at the social and historical reasons for contemporary understandings of each. The substantive topics covered may include such areas as the body, sex and gender; the emotions; health and illness; food and feeding; individualism and the individual; childhood and ageing.

2 one-hour lectures per week and 1 one-hour tutorial per week.

Lectures for this version of the course are to be timetabled at the same times and venue(s) as those for the 15 credit version.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (60%); continuous assessment (40%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

SO 2504
STUDYING SOCIAL LIFE 2
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Professor D Inglis

Pre-requisite(s): Both level 1 Sociology courses.

Note(s): This course is worth 15 credits. There is also an expanded 30 credit version which runs simultaneously. Students may only take either the 15 credit or 30 credit course, not both. Intending Honours students must take at least 45 credit points from Sociology level 2 courses.

This course compliments the level 2 Sociology course given in the first semester. It familiarises students with various issues in macro-sociology, the study of large-scale social institutions and long-term social changes. Particular focus is on the sociological analysis of contemporary social and political problems and controversies, looking at the social and historical reasons behind their emergence. The substantive topics covered may include such areas of contemporary social and political concern as risk, the changing nature of economy and work, consumerism and consumption, tourism, social movements, nationalism and food production. Emphasis is put on how different kinds of sociologists both conceptualise and empirically research such matters.

2 one-hour lectures per week, every second week, and 1 one-hour tutorial per week, every second week.

Lectures for this version of the course are to be timetabled at the same times and venue(s) as those for the 30 credit version.

1st Attempt: 1 one-hour written examination (60%); continuous assessment (40%).

Resit: 1 one-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

SO 2505
STUDYING SOCIAL LIFE 2 (EXTENDED)
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Professor D Inglis

Pre-requisite(s): Both level 1 Sociology courses.

Note(s): This is the extended, 30 credit version of the 15 credit version of this course. It is particularly for intending Sociology Honours students, but is open to all students with the necessary pre-requisites. A student cannot take both the 15 and 30 credit versions of the course. Intending Honours students must take at least 45 credit points from Sociology level 2 courses.

This course compliments the level 2 Sociology course given in the first semester. It familiarises students with various issues in macro-sociology, the study of large-scale social institutions and long-term social changes. Particular focus is on the sociological analysis of contemporary social and political problems and controversies, looking at the social and historical reasons behind their emergence. The substantive topics covered may include such areas of contemporary social and political concern as risk, the changing nature of economy and work, consumerism and consumption, tourism, social movements, nationalism and food production. Emphasis is put on how different kinds of sociologists both conceptualise and empirically research such matters.

2 one-hour lectures per week and 1 one-hour tutorial per week.

Lectures for this version of the course are to be timetabled at the same times and venue(s) as those for the 15 credit version.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (60%); continuous assessment (40%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

 

> Level 3
SO 3024 / SO 3524
SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Professor B C Hayes

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 and above who have achieved 75 credit points from level 1 and 2 Sociology courses.

Note(s): This course will be available in the second half-session of 2012/13 as SO 3524.

The course covers the following areas:

  • Underlying philosophy of social science research in terms of what counts as knowledge.
  • Qualitative research methods, such as in-depth interviewing and participant observation.
  • Quantitative research methods, such as sampling and questionnaire construction and design.
  • Elementary statistical analyses, such as graphical displays of data, measures of central tendency and variation, cross-tabulations and elaboration.

    There are 3 one-hour lectures (weeks 1-6) and to enhance learning, particularly in relation to the statistical component of the course, followed by 2 one-hour lectures plus 1 one-hour workshop (weeks 7-12).

    1st Attempt: Class test (50%) and 1 two-hour examination (50%). Students are not required to pass both elements as long as an overall pass is achieved.

    If an overall pass is not achieved the failed component or components must be retaken.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Formative assessment is in terms of weekly class exercises plus a final mock exam, for which oral feedback is provided.

    Feedback is provided throughout the course through weekly class exercises.

    SO 3066 / SO 3566
    THINKING SOCIOLOGICALLY
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Bone

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 and above who have achieved 75 credit points from level 1 and 2 Sociology courses.

    The course aims to give students an understanding of what constitutes core sociological ways of theorising and researching specific aspects of social life. It considers the similarities and differences between the various theoretical and methodological orientations of key sociologists from the nineteenth century to the present day. The course also considers the relevance, or otherwise, of these ideas to understanding contemporary society.

    2 one-hour lectures and 1 one-hour tutorial per week.

    1st Attempt: Examination (60%), continuous assessment (40%). Continuous assessment consists of one essay of 2,500 words.

    Resit: Examination (100%) unless candidate opts to carry forward continuous assessment grade.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

    SO 3067 / SO 3567
    RELIGION AND SOCIETY
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Trzebiatowska

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 and above who have achieved 75 credit points in level 1 and 2 Sociology courses.

    The central concern of the course is the place of religion in the modern world. Various aspects of modernity that have undermined the plausibility of the supernatural are examined, as are the ways in which religion remains a powerful force for aiding cultural transitions and the defence of ethnic identity. Although the substance of the course is the sociology of religion, it is designed to teach students basic sociological ideas.

    Two 1 hour lectures (Tues at 11 and 2) and 1 one hour tutorial (to be arranged) per week.

    Continuous assessment : two 2000 word essays (20% EACH); examination - 60%

    Examination (100%) unless candidate opts to carry forward continuous assessment grade.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Class presentations (2 per semester) for which feedback is provided.

    Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

     

    > Level 4

    PLEASE NOTE: Resit: (for Honours students only): Candidates achieving a CAS mark of 6-8 may be awarded compensatory level 1 credit. Candidates achieving a CAS mark of less than 6 will be required to submit themselves for re-assessment and should contact the Course Co-ordinator for further details.

    SO 4024 / SO4524
    POLITICS & RELIGION
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Professor S Bruce

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 only. Students should normally have 135 credits in Sociology courses. Students lacking these credits may be allowed to take the course with the Head of Department's permission.

    Note(s): This course will be available in the first half-session of 2012/13 as SO 4024.

    This course examines the many ways in which politics and religion interact in the modern world. Key topics are the place of religion in nationalist and ethnic identity politics; religion and violence; religion and democratization; the politics of non-Christian minorities in the West, and a comparison of Christian politics in the UK and USA.

    1 two-hour combined lecture and associated seminar session per week and for each student, two essay consultations as arranged.

    1st Attempt: 1 written examination (60%) and continuous assessment (40%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

    SO 4025 / SO 4525
    BODY WORK AND BODY WORKERS
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr D Gimlin

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 only. Students should normally have 135 credits in Sociology courses. Students lacking these credits may be allowed to take the course with the Head of Department's permission.

    Note(s): This course will be available in the first half-session of 2012/13 as SO 4025.

    This course examines activities intended to alter the form and functioning of the human body. Drawing upon case studies of various types of 'body work', the course will address the following topics: the influence of class and other forms of stratification on the ways people develop their bodies and on the symbolic value attached to particular bodily forms; the role of 'body experts' in shaping understandings of legitimate vs illegitimate body practices; the body's implication in the buying and selling of labour power; and the means through which physical capital is converted into other resources and rewards.

    1 one-hour lecture and 1 one-hour tutorial per week.

    1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (60%) and continuous assessment (40%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

    SO 4026 / SO 4526
    THE SOCIOLOGY OF PEACE PROCESSES
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Professor J Brewer

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 only. Students should normally have 135 credits in Sociology courses. Students lacking these credits may be allowed to take the course with the Head of Department's permission.

    Co-requisite(s): This course will not be available in 2012/13.

    The course addresses communal violence and its resolution from a sociological perspective. It focuses on sociology's contribution to understanding peace processes as it contrasts with governance and human rights approaches that normally dominate the literature. This involves analysis of the different types of post-violence society and the different ways in which peace can be achieved, with attention being focused on post-violence societies based around negotiated peace settlements. The course explores the sociological features of peace accords and of post violence adjustment problems and draws heavily on the experiences of societies like Northern Ireland, South Africa, Rwanda, Sri Lanka and various South American countries.

    1 two-hour seminar per week.

    1st Attempt: 1 three-hour examination (60%) and continuous assessment (40%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

    SO 4028
    RESEARCH PROJECT
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Bone

    Pre-requisite(s): SO 3522 Available only to students in Programme Year 4 only. Students should normally have 135 credits in Sociology courses. Students lacking these credits may be allowed to take the course with the Head of Department's permission.

    This course affords students the opportunity to apply their sociological knowledge and research skills to an individual piece of research, focusing on a topic selected by the student and approved by the department. Over the course of the project, with guidance from a member of staff, the student will conduct a literature review of relevant material, select appropriate research methods, gather and analyse data, and write a final report. While the techniques of analysis will vary with the nature of the research problem, all students will be guided in the arts of critical analysis, report planning, and report writing. Particular emphasis will be given to helping students develop their own skills.

    Project tutorial programme and individual supervision.

    1st Attempt: In-course assessment: project report (100%).

    Resit: In-course grades will be carried forward unless the student opts to resubmit course work.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Written feedback will be offered on the finished project report.

    SO 4033 / SO 4533
    THE SOCIOLOGY OF THE CITY
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Bone

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 only. Students should normally have 135 credits in Sociology courses. Students lacking these credits may be allowed to take the course with the Head of Department's permission.

    Note(s): This course will not be available in 2012/13.

    This course focuses on the various sociological implications of living in cities, and the way in which the complexities inherent in urban living fundamentally alter processes of identity formation and social interaction, as well as shaping the wider institutions that give form and pattern to everyday life. Various theoretical models of urbanisation, community, modernity and selfhood will be explored, against the background of a range of substantive topics tracing the key socio-historical developments that have marked the transition from the pastoral society tothe contemporary global megalopolis.

    1 one-hour lecture and 1 one-hour tutorial per week.

    1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (60%); continuous assessment (40%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

    SO 4036 / SO 4536
    EUROPEAN SOCIETIES
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: TBC

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 only. Students should normally have 135 credits in Sociology courses. Students lacking these credits may be allowed to take the course with the Head of Department's permission.

    Note(s): This course will be available in the first half-session of 2012/13 as SO 4036.

    The course considers European Societies from a sociological perspective, addressing the social issues and social processes that affect Europe. Topics that are normally only addressed as national issues such as work, family, and religion are examined at the European level. The course will address how the widening and integration of Europe has raised issues such as nationalism, xenophobia and migration. The course begins by introducing various theoretical concepts which provide a framework for the course and are then developed through the more substantive topics which may include the history of European Societies, family patterns in Europe, employment and welfare in Europe, xenophobia and racism.

    1 two-hour seminar per week.

    1st Attempt: Examination (60%), continuous assessment (40%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

    SO 4037 / SO 4537
    POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr C Kollmeyer

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 only. Students should normally have 135 credits in Sociology courses. Students lacking these credits may be allowed to take the course with the Head of Department's permission.

    Note(s): This course will be available in the second half-session of 2012/13 as SO 4537.

    This course aims to give students an understanding of the social basis of politics. It begins by examining the classic paradigms of political sociology, paying particular attentions to those developed by Marx, Weber, and Tocqueville. It then examines several substantive issues and debates on the nature of contemporary political life, such as those surrounding the changing nature of civil society, the power of large corporations, the relative decline of class politics and rise of cultural politics, the media's influence on public opinion, and globalization's effect on democracy.

    1 one-hour lecture and 1 one-hour tutorial per week.

    1st Attempt: Examination (60%) and continuous assessment (40%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

    SO 4038 / SO 4538
    THE SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION AND SEXUALITY
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Trzebiatowska

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 only. Students should normally have 135 credits in Sociology courses. Students lacking these credits may be allowed to take the course with the Head of Department's permission.

    Note(s): This course will not be available in 2012/13.

    This course addresses the relationship between sexuality and religion from a sociological perspective. It deals with negotiating sexual identities in the context of traditional and new religions by drawing on a number of theoretical approaches and case studies. Particular attention is paid to restricting and liberating aspects of religion which shape the sexual citizenship of individuals and groups.

    1 one-hour lectures and 1 one-hour tutorial per week.

    1st Attempt: Examination (60%) and continuous assessment (40%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

    SO 4039 / SO 4539
    SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION AND CULTURE
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr A McKinnon

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 only. Students should normally have 135 credits in Sociology courses. Students lacking these credits may be allowed to take the course with the Head of Department's permission.

    Note(s): This course will be available in the second half-session of 2012/13 as SO 4539.

    In this class we will examine social theories of religion, beginning with a few important classics (Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Nietzsche), and continuing on to as well as more contemporary social theory. Unlike in classical theory, where the religion question looms large, in most contemporary theory, religion has become a somewhat more peripheral concern. Much of such recent theorizing, however, provides us with vital tools for a sociological comprehension of contemporary (as well as historical) religion. With the question of religion in mind, we will examine relevant writings such as those of the Frankfurt School, Michel Foucault, Charles Taylor, Pierre Bourdieu, Ulrich Beck, René Girard and Dorothy Smith. Our focus will be on thematics that bridge the sociological study of religion with topics relevant to other areas of research. These include power, sacrifice, the body, discipline, ritual, the social imaginary, consumption/commodification, globalization, risk, and rationality.

    1 one-hour lecture and 1 one-hour tutorial per week.

    1st Attempt: Examination (60%), and continuous assessment (40%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

    SO 4040 / SO 4540
    SOCIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Mr A Glendinning

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 only. Students should normally have 135 credits in Sociology courses. Students lacking these credits may be allowed to take the course with the Head of Department's permission.

    Note(s): This course will not be available in 2012/13.

    The course utilises secondary sources to demonstrate approaches to the analysis of sociological data. Thematic areas are considered within the course as case studies - for example, the sociology of religion - and theoretical frames therein, where key concepts are operationalised by means of data from large-scale, survey research studies. Analysis is undertaken by means of SPSS for Windows.

    1 one-hour lecture and 1 one-hour workshop per week.

    1st Attempt: Examination (60%), and continuous assessment (40%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

    SO 4042 / SO 4542
    SOCIOLOGY OF CONTEMPORARY EUROPEAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr C Flesher Fominaya

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 only. Students should normally have 135 credits in Sociology courses. Students lacking these credits may be allowed to take the course with the Head of Department's permission.

    Note(s): This course will be available in the first half-session of 2012/13 as xx xxxx.

    The study of social change and transformation has always been at the core of sociology, and social movements and collective action are key areas of sociological analysis. This course provides an exploration of some contemporary European social movements (20th and 21st century) and the theoretical perspectives that have been developed to analyze them and inspire them. The links between theory and action will also be explored. After presenting an initial overview of social movement theory, we will explore such areas as New Social movement theory and movements, European Feminist Theory and movements, Autonomous theory and movements, and Nationalist theory and movements.

    1 one-hour lecture and 1 one-hour seminar per week.

    1st Attempt: Examination (60%), continuous assessment (40%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

    SO 4043 / SO 4543
    SEX SCANDALS: FROM FEMINISM TO POST-FEMINISM
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Zalewski

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 only. Students should normally have 135 credits in Sociology courses. Students lacking these courses may be allowed to take the course with the Head of Department's permission.

    Note(s): This course will be available in 2012/13.

    This course is inspired by the paradoxical invisibility of the work of sex/gender in political 'sex scandals' (eg. Lewinsky/Clinton) whereby 'sex' appears to be the most important factor in the story, yet is ultimately rendered irrelevent in the context of the 'bigger picture' (eg national security or simply running the country). We will work with the ideas of a 'sex-scandal' to illustrate and analyze the persistent 'scandal of gender' in a number of social/political sites. The overarching theoretical and empirical focus through which we will look at specific issues is post-feminism. The sites we will investigate include: celebrity femininity, science, human rights, gender mainstreaming and cyborg citizenship.

    One hour lecture: time to be arranged.
    One hour tutorial: to be arranged.

    1st Attempt: Short paper (10%), essay (40%), project (50%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

    SO 4044 / SO 4544
    GENDER, SEX AND DEATH IN A GLOBALIZED WORLD
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Zalewski

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 only. Students should normally have 135 credits in Sociology courses. Students lacking these credits may be allowed to take the course with the Head of Department's permission.

    Note(s): This course is open to Master of Arts senior honours students. This course will not be available in 2012/13.

    Wars rage, famines ravage, people die, politicians talk. Osama bin Laden still evades 'capture'; Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad says he is open to US participation in talks on Iran's nuclear programme; Barak Obama and Gordon Brown meet to discuss the future of the Middle East/the world economy. The names and faces change over time but the issues still seem to remain the same. What also seems to remain the same is that these events of international significance seem to have little to do with gender in any really important sense. This course suggests otherwise; this course suggests that international politics and global practices are deeply constituted by ideas about gender and sex. To investigate this we will study a range of issues from war to the military; from masculinity to Hollywood movies.

    1 one-hour lecture and 1 one-hour tutorial per week.

    1st Attempt: Continuous assessment: Critical review (10%) (1,500 words); essay (40%) (4,000 words); project (50%) (6,000 words).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

    SO 4045 / SO 4545
    ANIMALS AND SOCIETY
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr R Wilkie

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 only. Students should normally have 135 credits in Sociology courses. Students lacking these credits may be allowed to take the course with the Head of Department's permission.

    Note(s): This course will be available in the second half-session of 2012/13 as SO 4545.

    Since the 1980’s, the social sciences have witnessed an ‘animal turn’, as evidenced by the emerging field of human-animal studies. This course explores the sociological and political significance of human-animal relations in contemporary modern societies, and considers the implications of the ‘animal turn’ on mainstream disciplinary assumptions. The institutionalised use of animals, such as agricultural animals, is also increasingly contentious. The course outlines key historical, religious and philosophical influences to contextualise the ambiguous and multifaceted nature of interspecies relations, and draws on perspectives such as actor-network theory, ecofeminism, symbolic interactionism, postmodernism, and ‘public sociology’ to inform related discussions and debates.

    1 one-hour lecture and 1 one-hour tutorial per week.

    1st attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (60%); continuous assessment (40%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

    SO 4062 / SO 4562
    SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION AND SEXUALITY
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Trzebiatowska

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 only. Students should normally have 135 credits in Sociology courses. Students lacking these credits may be allowed to take the course with the Head of Department's permission.

    This course addresses the relationship between sexuality and religion from a sociological perspective. It deals with negotiating sexual identities in the context of traditional and new religions by drawing on a number of theoretical approaches and case studies. Particular attention is paid to restricting and liberating aspects of religion which shape the sexual citizenship of individuals and groups.

    1 one-hour lectures and 1 one-hour tutorial per week.

    1st Attempt: 1 three-hour examination (60%), one class presentation (10%) and one 3,000 word essay (30%).

    Resit: 1 three-hour examination (100%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    One 3,000 word essay and one class presentation.

    Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

    SO 4523
    SOCIOLOGY OF ART AND CULTURE
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Professor D Inglis

    Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 only. Students should normally have 135 credits in Sociology courses. Students lacking these credits may be allowed to take the course with the Head of Department's permission.

    Note(s): This course will not be available in 2012/13.

    This course examines how cultural issues can be investigated sociologically. It introduces students to the main range of theoretical approaches to the sociology of culture, including classical Marxist and neo-Marxist paradigms such as those of Gramsci and the Frankfurt School, semiotics, culturalism, and the ideas of Pierre Bourdieu. It also offers students the chance to explore sociological viewpoints on the nature of artistic creation and other forms of cultural activity. A particular feature of the course involves analysis of what the terms ‘high culture’ and ‘popular culture’ may mean, and the stakes that are involved in their use in different social contexts. The relations between social groups, forms of power and modes of cultural creation, dissemination and consumption are explored and reflected upon.

    1 one-hour lecture and 1 one-hour seminar per week.

    1st Attempt: Examination (60%), and continuous assessment (40%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work, where appropriate. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.