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INTERNATIONAL FOUNDATION PROGRAMME (SCIENCE)

> Level 1
SF 1001
INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY I: CONCEPTS AND THEORY (FOUNDATION)
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr G Scott

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): SF 1002

Note(s): This course is only open to students following the International BSc Foundation (Psychology) Programme.

  • Biological psychology, perception.

  • Developmental psychology.

The course parent course is comprised of 3 one hour lectures/week and 6 one hour workshops.

In addition, International BSc Foundation Programme students will have an additional meeting with course tutors once a fortnight

1st attempt: 75% multiple-choice examination. 25% continous assessment in workshops.

Resit: 75% multiple-choice examination. 25% continuous assessments.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

MyAberdeen and lectures are used to provide in-class quizzes.

Students receive feedback on their performance on continuous assessment.

SF 1002
INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY I: METHODS AND APPLICATIONS (FOUNDATION)
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr D Pearson

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): SF 1001

Note(s): This course is only open to students following the International BSc Foundation (Psychology) Programme.

The course will cover core experimental methods in psychology. These experimental methods will be linked to a range of data handling techniques and interpretation skills.

The course will consist of a one hour lecture per week, plus a weekly group practical (2 hours), and individual participation in 8 hours of psychological experiments over the half session.

In addition, International BSc Foundation Programme students will have an additional meeting with course tutors once a fortnight.

1st Attempt: 100% continuous assessment of practical group activities; including one full practical report.

Resit: Students will be able to repeat individual components.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment will be provided through quizzes and exercises in the practical groups.

Students will receive written feedback on continuous assessment.

SF 1003
INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL SCIENCES (FOUNDATION)
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr G.T.A. McEwan & Dr J Barrow

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): This course is only open to students following the International BSc Foundation (Medical Sciences) Programme.

This course will introduce core disciplines associated with the School of Medical Sciences. Through exploration of basic human body function in health and disease, the course will engage students with the fundamental concepts of anatomy, physiology and neuroscience. This will lay the foundation for understanding the general principles of pharmacology, developmental biology and the biomolecular sciences. Discipline specific skills and techniques will be utilised to enhance understanding and to develop broader medical science skills and methods.

The parent course consists of three 1 hour lectures per week and one 3 hour practical/problem-solving class per fortnight.

International BSc Foundation students will also receive one 1 hour tutorial per fortnight.

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (100%). 1 two-hour in-course MCQ exam (50%) and completed laboratory reports (50%).

Resit: 1 two-hour MCQ exam (70%) and previous continuous assessment (30%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

PRS-based MCQ in lectures/practicals.

Problem-solving sessions.

Practical reports will be marked with written comments.

Students given general feedback on performance during PRS sessions.

General feedback provided following in-course MCQ assessments.

General feedback following problem-solving sessions.

SF 1004
ORGANISMAL BIOLOGY (FOUNDATION)
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Baird & Dr J McDonald

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): This course is only open to students following the International BSc Foundation (Biological Sciences) Programme.

Organismal biology explores the challenges of being alive. The course content comprises modules pertaining to the comparative study of life functions (reproduction, growth and development, nutrition, gas exchange, circulation, excretion, movement and communication) in a diverse range of plants, animals and microbes. The emphasis is on describing the similarities and differences amongst plants, animals and microbes pertaining to the integration and regulation of life functions that allow survival of individuals and species in a range of environments.

Twelve-week course in first half-session. Three 1-hour lectures per week and one 3-hour laboratory practical every second week (but only five practicals in total). Total contact hours: 36 lectures and five practicals; in total, 51 hours.

In addition, International BSc Foundation students will also receive 1 hour tutorial per fortnight = 57 hours total.

1st Attempt: One 2-hour MCQ exam (60%) and in-course assessment (40%).

To pass this course, a pass must be achieved both the theory exam and the in-course assessment.

Resit: One 2-hour MCQ exam in the same format as the main exam. The resit paper may contain questions pertaining to both the practical and lecture components of the course.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Four compulsory online tests (one test every three weeks) will help students assess how well they are learning the course material. Student performance will be monitored.

Students will receive regular written feedback on each lab report before the start of the next practical class. Students who are identified as having difficulty in correctly completing the formative online tests will be invited to meet members of the course team to identify difficluties and discuss solutions.

SF 1005
BIOLOGY FOR UNDERGRADUATES (BUGS) (FOUNDATION)
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr C Dennis, Dr L MacPherson & Dr N King

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): SF 1004 and SF 1504

Note(s): The course is a compulsory for all students following the International BSc Foundation (Biological Sciences) Programme.

The course is designed to promote interest and understanding pertaining to topics in biology. This is done by encouraging good practice in learning and by developing competence in relevant skills pertaining to the study of biological science. Topics will be specific to the degree intention of individual students, although the skills are mostly generic. Students will receive summative assessment on four pieces of in-course work, including an element of project work, which provides students with the opportunity of demonstrating their attainment of learning outcomes, in an integrative manner pertaining to a topic of their choice.

One 1-hour introductory session. Twelve 1.5-hour tutorial sessions, every second week during the first and second half-sessions (18 hour in total). Four 1-hour plenary sessions (one every sixth week). Grand total of 23 hours.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment (100%) of which there are four components (two in each half-session).

Resit: Submission/resubmission of those component exercises which previously had not been submitted for marking or for which students have been awarded a fail mark, respectively.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students will have access to a range of formative online exercises that will enhance their competence in skills components of the course. Participation in these exercises will be monitored and students with apparent difficulty will be identified and invited to discuss solutions with members of the teaching staff.

Students will be offered formative assessment of draft copy pertaining to in-course components before summative assessment is made of final copy.

Students will receive feedback (formal and informal) on formative exercises. They will also receive written feedback on each of their in-course components of summative assessment.

SF 1006
CHEMISTRY FOR PHYSICAL SCIENCES 1
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr W Harrison

Pre-requisite(s): SQA Higher in Chemistry at B or better, or GCE A level in Chemistry, or equivalent qualification; other qualifications with permission of the course coordinator.

Co-requisite(s): As specified in the University Calendar for certain degree programs, otherwise none.

Note(s): This course cannot be taken with CM 1020. Students who intend to continue with Chemistry beyond level 1 and who do not have a mathematics pass at Higher or A-level are recommended to take the Introductory Mathematics courses MA 1007 and MA 1507.

This course covers the foundations of chemistry in the physical sciences and engineering. The course includes quantitative chemical calculations, atomic structure, the periodic table, and chemical bonding. The section on organic chemistry describes structural and stereochemical aspects and simple functional groups, and the section on physical chemistry includes study of the gas laws, heats of reaction and the energetics of chemical processes.

2 one-hour lectures (times TBA) and 1 one-hour class workshop (time TBA) per week. 6 fortnightly three-hour laboratory classes (times TBA).

Additional support tutorials to be arranged by the Course Coordinator, as need arises.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%), continuous assessment (30%) and lab work (20%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Marks for lab experiment follow-up tests and MyAberdeen assignments available as soon as possible after the assessments; informal discussion with students in lab sessions. All of the course team have "open door" policies for meeting students.

SF 1007
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING AND PRINCIPLES
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr W Vasconcelos

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

The course will cover the basic principles of computer programming consisting of topics such as the following:

  • Fundamental programming concepts including variables and scope, conditional statements, and iteration.
    Pseudocode.

  • Fundamental algorithms including simple sorting and searching, and data structures including arrays.

  • Boolean algebra, logic, set theory and proof.

  • Relations, functions, combinatorics, graphs.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour tutorial or practical. Additional support tutorials to be arranged by the Course Coordinator, as need arises.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forwards (25%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

SF 1008
GRAND CHALLENGES OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr F Guerin

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

The first part of the course overviews important problems in AI (for example Natural Language Processing, Computer Vision, and Robotics), and a number of techniques which are used to tackle these problems (for example search, neural networks, and reinforcement learning). The second part of the course looks at relevant areas of Cognitive Science, including Psychology, Linguistics, Neuroscience and Philosophy. finally the course looks at the history of AI and possible future scenarios.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 one-hour practical, 1 one-hour tutorial. Additional support tutorials to be arranged by the Course Coordinator, as need arises.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); Continuous assessment: a series of short tests in practical sessions (25%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); Continuous assessment mark carried forward (25%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide student with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in electronically with incorrect answers highlighted and correct answers given. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

SF 1009
CALCULUS I
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Libman

Pre-requisite(s): SCE H or GCE A level in Mathematics. This course may not be included in a minimum curriculum with EG 1503.

Note(s): The course starts from the beginning of the subject, but it is advantageous to be familiar with the material on Calculus contained in the Scottish Highers syllabus.

Calculus allows for changing situations and complicated averaging processes to be described in precise ways. It was one of the great intellectual achievements of the late 17-th and early 18-th Century. Early applications were made to modeling planetary motion and to calculating tax payable on land. Now the ideas are used in broad areas of mathematics and science and parts of the commercial world. The course begins with an introduction to fundamental mathematical concepts and then develops the basic ideas of the differential calculus of a single variable and explains some of the ways they are applied.

3 one-hour lectures and 1 one-hour tutorial per week. Additional support tutorials to be arranged by the Course Coordinator, as need arises.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (70%) and in-course assessment (30%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination paper (maximum of (100%) resit and (70%) resit with (30%) in-course assessment).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Informal assessment of weekly homework through discussions in tutorials.

In-course assignments will normally be marked within one week and feedback provided to students in tutorials. Students will be invited to contact Course Coordinator for feedback on the final examination.

SF 1010
INTRODUCTORY MATHEMATICS I
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Boyle

Pre-requisite(s): S or GCSE or equivalent in Mathematics. This course is not open to students with the equivalent of a Higher in Mathematics at grade B or above.

This is a basic course aimed primarily at helping students achieve greater accuracy, speed and confidence in mathematics. It is suitable both for those who may need mathematics in future study and for students who want to improve their abilities without any intention of studying the subject beyond first year. The course is taught using the interactive computer software CALMAT, enabling students to work in their own way and time but with immediate feedback. Support from staff is available on a daily basis. There is a requirement to attend a single weekly test for continuous assessment. The topics covered include basic arithmetic and algebraic operations, linear and quadratic equations, logarithms and the interpretation of graphs, and an introduction to the calculus.

1 one-hour lecture and 2 one-hour supervised computer classes per week. Additional Tutorial Support to be arranged by the Course Coordinator, as need arises.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment (100%) for students who perform sufficiently well in weekly computerised tests. Any student who fails to achieve by in-course assessment or who wishes to upgrade CAS mark obtained, can take the end of course computerised examination or its resit.

Resit: Computerised examination similar to 1st attempt examination.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Regular computerised tests discussed during computer practicals.

In-course assessment will be marked and feedback provided to the students.

Informal feedback at computer practicals.

SF 1501
INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY II: CONCEPTS AND THEORY (FOUNDATION)
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr G Scott

Pre-requisite(s): SF 1001 and SF 1002

Co-requisite(s): SF 1502

Note(s): This course is only available to students following the International BSc Foundation (Psychology) Programme.

This course introduces Psychology as the science of behaviour and mental processes. State of the art knowledge in cognitive psychology, social psychology and animal behaviour are introduced.

The parent course comprises 3 one hour lectures/week and 6 one hour workshops, 2 every three weeks.

In addition, International BSc Foundation Programme students will have an additional meeting with course tutors once a fortnight.

1st attempt: 75% multiple-choice examination. 25% continous assessment in workshops.

Resit: 75% multiple-choice examination. 25% continuous assessments.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

MyAberdeen and lectures are used to provide in-class quizzes.

Students receive feedback on their performance on continuous assessment.

SF 1502
INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY II: METHODS AND APPLICATIONS (FOUNDATION)
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr D Pearson

Pre-requisite(s): SF 1001 and SF 1002

Co-requisite(s): SF 1501

Note(s): This course is only open to students following the International BSc Foundation (Psychology) Programme.

The course will cover core experimental methods in psychology building on the key skills developed in the first half-session Methods & Applications (Foundation) course. These experimental methods will be linked to a range of data handling techniques and interpretation skills.

The course will consist of a one hour lecture per week, plus a weekly group practical (2 hours), and individual participation in 8 hours of psychological experiments over the half session.

In addition, International BSc Foundation Programme students will have an additional meeting with course tutors once a fortnight.

1st Attempt: 100% continuous assessment of practicals; including two full practical write ups.

Resit: Students wil be able to repeat individual componments.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment will be provided through quizzes and exercises in the practical groups.

Students will receive written feedback on continuous assessment.

SF 1503
THE CELL (FOUNDATION)
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Barrow / Dr A Carrington

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): This course is only open to students following the International BSc Foundation (Medical Sciences) programme.

The course explores cells as the basic unit of life. All organisms are composed of cells whether they exist as single-celled microbes, or multi-cellular organisms, as in plants and animals. The course starts by discussing how cells evolved, illustrating the diversity of cells types while also showing how cells are all "variations on a theme". As the course progresses the structure and function of the cell is explored and the fundamental molecular concepts of life are introduced. Later in the course the focus will be on how cells are able to come together to form multi-cellular organisms such as animals and plants. This multi-cellularity requires cells to stick together and to communicate with each other. The course also explores how cells grow and divide and how some cells can differentiate to allow specialised functions. The last few lectures illustrate some of the exciting cell biology studies being carried out in the University of Aberdeen, ranging from fungal and parasite biology through to research into bone disease and cancer.

3 one hour lectures per week and 1 three hour practical class per fortnight.

International BSc Foundation students will also receive one 1 hour tutorial per fortnight.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour MCQ examination (60%) and in-course assessment (40%). Continuous assessment comprises: 5 laboratory reports and 5 MCQ tests.

Resit: 1 two-hour MCQ examination (60%) - this may contain material from both the practical and lecture components of the course - and in-course assessment carried forward from first attempt.(40%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

PRS-based revision sessions allow students to practice for MCQ tests and receive feedback on their performance.

Students are given general feedback on performance during PRS revision sessions.

Students receive on-line feedback on completion of the MCQ tests and quizzes.

SF 1504
ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (FOUNDATION)
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr C Dennis, Professor P Smith

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): This course is only open to students following the International BSc Foundation (Biological Sciences) Programme.

The content includes

  • Topics in Ecology: Biodiversity, Ecological Resources, Population Ecology, Community Ecology, Ecosystem Functioning.

  • Topics in Environmental Science: Ecosystems and Environment, The Atmosphere and the Oceans, Land Use and the Global Environment, Global Environmental Change - including Climate Change, GMOs, Acid Deposition, Ozone Depletion, Biodegradation of Crude Oils, Waste Management and the Environment.

Twelve-week course in second half-session. Three 1-hour lectures per week and one 3-hour laboratory practical every second week (but only five practicals in total; some practicals are tutorial-based). Total contact hours: 36 lectures and five practicals; in total, 51 hours.

International BSc Foundation students will also receive one 1 hour tutorial per fortnight.

1st Attempt: One 2-hour MCQ exam (60%) and in-course assessment (40%).

To pass this course, a pass must be achieved in both the theory exam and the in-course assessment.

Resit: One 2-hour MCQ exam in the same format as the main exam. The resit paper may contain questions pertaining to both the practical and lecture components of the course.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

There is no formal formative assessment but students will be expected to engage in tutorial-type discussions which will allow them to assess their own understanding of the course content.

The main source of feedback will be regular written comment on practical reports. These comments will be made available to students in advance of the next practical class.

SF 1506
CHEMISTRY FOR PHYSICAL SCIENCE 2
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr W Harrison

Pre-requisite(s): Pass in CM 1020 (Chemistry for the Life Sciences 1). Students with a pass in CM 1021 may be admitted with the permission of the course co-ordinator.

Co-requisite(s): As specified in the University Calendar for certain degree programs, otherwise none.

Note(s): This course may not be taken with CM 1512.

  • Biological molecules (amino acids, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, drugs).

  • supramolecular chemistry (intermolecular forces, hydrogen bonding).

  • metals in life (complexes, oxidation states), radiochemistry (radioactive decay, uses in biology and medicine).

2 one-hour lectures (times TBA) and 1 one-hour class workshop (time TBA) per week. Five fortnightly three-hour laboratory classes (times TBA).

Additional support tutorials to be arranged by the Course Coordinator, as need arises.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%), continuous assessment (30%) and lab work (20%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Marks for lab experiment follow-up tests and MyAberdeen assignments available as soon as possible after the assessments. Informal discussion with students in lab sessions. All of the course team have "open door" policies for meeting students.

SF 1507
COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr F Guerin

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

  • Basics: Number Systems, (Decimal Binary Hexadecimal), Binary Addition, Logic Gates, Transistors, Power Consumption, Boolean Algebra, Multiplexer/Decoders/Timing, Latches and Flip-Flops, Finite State Machines.

  • Building Blocks: Arithmetic Circuits, Number Systems (Fixed-Point, Floating-Point), Memory Arrays, Logic Arrays.

  • Assembly Language, Machine Language, Addressing Modes, Program execution, Heaps and stacks.

  • Microarchitecture: Single-Cycle Processor, Multicycle Processor, Pipelined Processor.

  • Memory Systems: Caches, Virtual Memory.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 one-hour practical, 1 one hour tutorial.

Additional support tutorials to be arranged by the Course Coordinator, as need arises.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); weekly tests (20%), practical coursework (30%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment carried forward (50%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

SF 1508
WEB TECHNOLOGY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr N Beacham

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

Topics will include:

  • Programming using a scripting language, including objects, methods, control structures, data types and collections.

  • Programming for the internet, including forms, application logic, database programming, and interaction with other applications using Web 2.0 technology such as Google Maps.

Four hours per week: 2 one hour lectures, 1 two hour practical.

Additional support tutorials to be arranged by the Course Coordinator, as need arises.

1st Attempt: 1 one-an-a-half-hours written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: Candidates only resit those components (multiple-choice examination, continuous assessment) which they failed at first attempt. Multiple-choice examination at resit is 1-and-a-half hours.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunies and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessment will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

SF 1509
CALCULUS II
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Prof V Gorbunov

Pre-requisite(s): SCE H or GCE A level in Mathematics; MA 1005 (recommended). This course may not be included in a minimum curriculum with EG 1503.

The course is a continuation of Calculus I from the 1st session. It develops the basic ideas concerning the integration of a function of one variable. It introduces Taylor series and determines these series for the most common functions. It also provides a first introduction to differential equations which are fundamental in applications of Mathematics to other sciences.

3 one-hour lectures and 1 one-hour tutorial per week. Additional Tutorial Support to be arranged by the Course Coordinator, as need arises.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (70%); in-course assessment (30%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination paper (maximum of (100%) resit and (70%) resit with (30%) in-course assessment).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Informal assessment of weekly homework through discussions in tutorials.

In-course assignments will normally be marked within one week and feedback provided to students in tutorials. Students will be invited to contact the Course Coordinator for feedback on the final examination.

SF 1510
INTRODUCTORY MATHEMATICS II
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Boyle

Pre-requisite(s): MA 1007 or equivalent. This course is not open to students with the equivalent of a Higher in Mathematics at Grade B or above.

The course emphasizes accuracy in performing calculations involving trigonometry, exponentials, techniques and application of differentiation and integration, vectors, complex numbers and matrices. The course is taught and examined using the CALMAT computer software.

1 one-hour lecture and 2 one-hour supervised computer classes per week. Additional tutorial support to be arranged by the Course Coordinator, as need arises.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment (100%) for students who perform sufficiently well in weekly computerised tests. Any student who fails to achieve by in-course assessment or who wishes to upgrade CAS mark obtained, can take the end of course computerised examination or its resit.

Resit: Computerised examination similar to 1st attempt examination.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Regular computerised tests discussed during computer practicals.

In-course assessment will be marked and feedback provided to the students.

Informal feedback at computer practicals.

SF 1511
CHEMISTRY FOR THE LIFE SCIENCES II
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr W Harrison

Pre-requisite(s): Pass in CM 1020 (Chemistry for the Life Sciences 1). Students with a pass in CM 1021 may be admitted with the permission of the course co-ordinator.

Co-requisite(s): As specified in the University Calendar for certain degree programs, otherwise none.

Note(s): This course may not be taken with CM 1512.

  • Biological molecules (amino acids, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, drugs).

  • Supramolecular chemistry (intermolecular forces, hydrogen bonding).

  • Metals in life (complexes, oxidation states), radiochemistry (radioactive decay, uses in biology and medicine).

2 one-hour lectures (times TBA) and 1 one-hour class workshop (time TBA) per week. Five fortnightly three-hour laboratory classes (times TBA).

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%), continuous assessment (30%) and lab work (20%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Marks for lab experiment follow-up tests and MyAberdeen assignments available as soon as possible after the assessments. Informal discussion with students in lab sessions. All of the course team have "open door" policies for meeting students.

SF1011
CHEMISTRY FOR THE LIFE SCIENCES I
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr W Harrison

Pre-requisite(s): No formal entry requirement but students without any previous experience in chemistry should contact the course coordinator to receive extra assistance and learning materials as appropriate.

Co-requisite(s): As specified in the University Calendar for certain degree programs, otherwise none.

Note(s): This course may not be taken with CM 1021.

This course surveys the foundation of chemistry as applied to the life sciences. It begins with a review of the basic concepts and language of chemistry and quantitative chemical calculations. Topics covered include fundamental organic and physical chemistry as applied to the life sciences.provides a grounding in the foundations of chemical science, with emphasis on the applications of chemistry in the life sciences. The course includes a review of the basic concepts and langauge of chemistry and quantitative chemical calculations. Topics covered include organic and physical chemistry as applied to the life sciences.

2 one-hour lectures (times TBA) and 1 one-hour class workshop (time TBA) per week. Five fortnightly three-hour laboratory classes (times TBA).

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%), continuous assessment (on-line tests) (30%) and lab work (20%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Marks for lab experiment follow-up tests and MyAberdeen assignments available as soon as possible after the assessments: informal discussion with students in lab sessions. All of the course team have "open door" policies for meeting students.