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MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

> Level 1
MR 1010
MARINE RESOURCES
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr D.R Green

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

  • Topography of the ocean basins

  • The oceans and atmosphere as a system

  • Impact of climate change

  • Marine resources and their management

  • Coastal and marine environments

  • Overfishing and pollution

  • Marine protected areas focus on the Galapagos National Park

11 x 1-hour lectures, supported by 11 x 1-hours follow-up sessions, plus one field trip.

1st Attempt: coursework (50%): one written report (34%) and one short presentation (16%)and exam (50%): MCQ + short answers.

Resit: original coursework carried forward, 50%, plus exam, 50%.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students complete an in-course quiz (on fisheries) and a short-answer exercise (on marine ecosystems); peer assessment of presentations.  However, with just 12 weeks of teaching, to include two summative assessments, it is difficult to arrange stand-alone formative assessment.  It makes more sense to consider feedback/feedforward in terms of onwards progression: e.g., students write just  one coursework report which is summatively assessed, but comments provided on this should help students to improve their performance next time: e.g., in the follow-up second half-session course.

Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard  comments sheets. Individual comments are supported by in-class feedback.

MR 1011
LAW AND THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr D.R Green

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

The legal system, sources of Law and Scots Law, International Law of the Sea, Marine Bill and Spatial Planning, Law of Ports and Harbours, Fishing Law, Marine Conservation and Law of the Coastal Zone, Fish Farm Regulation and Marine Environmental Law.

12 x 2-hour sessions, to incorporate lectures + tutorial/project/presentation work.

1st Attempt: Coursework (50%): one written report (30%) and one short presentation (20%); exam (50%).

Resit: Original coursework carried forward, 50%, plus exam, 50%.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

 

Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard  comments sheets. Individual comments are supported by in-class feedback.

MR 1514
MARINE AND COASTAL STUDIES
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr D.R Green

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

To introduce the student to the theory, practice and application of the geospatial technologies to coastal and marine environments. The course will include development of an appreciation of the role for spatial and temporal data and information in coastal and marine studies as a means to enhance knowledge and understanding of the coastal and marine environment. Students will develop a practical working knowledge of the use of e.g. environmental databases, remote sensing (including introductory techniques of digital image processing (DIP), Geographical Information Systems (GIS), Global Positioning Systems (GPS), digital mapping, cartography and hydrographic charts, and online Internet-based GIS, Information, and Decision Support Systems (DSS) for a range of coastal and marine applications. A number of examples will be given in class, through tutorial exercises, practicals and lectures.

The lectures will include some or all of the following subject areas:

  • A contextual setting for the role of data and information in coastal and marine studies

  • Requirements for Monitoring, Mapping and Modelling of coastal and marine environment

  • Introduction to the Geospatial Technologies

  • Introduction to Databases and Information Systems

  • Introduction to Remote Sensing

  • Introduction to Digital Image Processing

  • Introduction to Geographical Information Systems and Spatial Analysis

  • Introduction to Mobile Field Data Collection including GPS

  • Coastal and Marine Applications of the Geospatial Technologies

The tutorial/practical exercises will include the following subjects:

  • Introductory Digital Image Processing

  • Introductory GIS (Geographical Information Systems)

  • Data and Information Resources e.g. online Internet examples e.g. image catalogues and mapping.

12 x 2hr lectures/tutorials/practical/fieldtrip.  

1st Attempt: 100% course work

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students complete an in-mid-term quiz.  However, with just 12 weeks of teaching, to include two summative assessments, it is difficult to arrange stand-alone formative assessment.  It makes more sense to consider feedback/feedforward in terms of onwards progression: e.g., students write just  one coursework report which is summatively assessed, but comments provided on this should help students to improve their performance next time: e.g., in the follow-up Level 2 courses.

Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard  comments sheets. Individual comments are supported by in-class feedback.

 

> Level 2
MR 2510
COASTAL ENGINEERING
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr D R Green

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to BSc Marine and Coastal Resource Management students in Programme Year 2 or above.

An introductory overview of civil, coastal and offshore engineering, as applicable to coastal management. This will include the foundations of coastal engineering such as an understanding of: coastal design and design considerations, synthesis, simplification and systems, engineering time, jargon and terminology, and data sources and requirements. Basic coverage of topics such as water waves, wave generation, wave analysis, wave transformation, and wave models will be provided. In addition, attention will be given to tides, currents, storm surges, and climate change including sea level rise, as well as coastal sediment transport, coastal shore processes, coastal geomorphology, and an introduction to coastal management. Coastal design, the design of structures, and shore protection (sediment movement, groynes, seawalls, breakwaters, beach nourishment), harbour and marina design will all be briefly examined. Coverage may also include reference to some or all of the following: regulations and legislation affecting civil engineering works with emphasis on coastal locations; features of energy generation with emphasis on renewable resources; principles and techniques of slope and cliff stability, sea defences and riverbank protection work; deposition and dredging in estuaries and coastal locations; issues regarding the design and construction of harbours and marinas; Design, construction and environmental impact of footpaths, tracks and dirt roads in coastal locations. Some time will also be spent on problem-solving.

1 two-hour session per week, plus reading, private study, research projects, student presentations, peer group review, workshops and informal discussion, plus a local field visit.

1st Attempt: 100% coursework

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Informal in-class discussions are an integral part of the course. There is no stand-alone, formal formative assessment. However, feedback on summative assessments should help students to improve their subsequent performances within the course and for subsequent courses. See box below.

Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets. Individual comments are supported by in-class feedback.

MR 2511
COASTAL ECOLOGY, CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr D R Green

Pre-requisite(s): None. Available only to students in Programme Year 2.

This course focuses primarily on an examination of the ecology of the coastal strip, namely the intertidal zone, rather than the marine environment. It is designed to provide a bridge between geography and ecology/zoology. In so doing, it also provides an opportunity to examine the relationships between the hydrological catchment, the marine environment, and the coastal zone. More specifically the course will:

Develop an understanding of the ecology and diversity of cliffs, rocky and sandy shores, and estuary environments.

Examine the physical processes that affect the abundance and distribution of coastal ecology.

Adopt an ecosystem approach to the management of coastal environments used to sustain and protect coastal areas from environmental impacts.

Consider fieldwork activities to develop skills in species identification and some of the modern methods of shore survey.

Make use of environmental databases

Examine the role of the geospatial technologies such as GIS, remote sensing, GPS, mobile data collection, and the internet in studying the coastal environment.

1 two-hour timetabled slot per week. The course will be taught through a combination of class-based lectures, seminars, tutorials, practicals, and field trips. Students will be expected to take part in discussion sessions both in the class and in the field. Students are encouraged to make use of the QML and the internet to enhance their knowledge and understanding of coastal ecology.

1st Attempt: 100% course work

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Informal in-class discussions are an integral part of the course. The mid-term quiz provides formal formative assessment. Also, feedback on summative assessments should help students to improve their subsequent performances within the course and for subsequent courses. See box below.

Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets. Individual comments are supported by in-class feedback.

 

> Level 4

PLEASE NOTE: Resit: (for Honours students only): Candidates achieving a CAS mark of 6-8 may be awarded compensatory level 1 credit. Candidates achieving a CAS mark of less than 6 will be required to submit themselves for re-assessment and should contact the Course Co-ordinator for further details.

GG 4558
CURRENT ISSUES IN MARINE AND COASTAL MANAGEMENT
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr D R Green (and others)

Pre-requisite(s): At least two of: MR 2502, MR 2505, GG 2003, GG 2004, GG 2504, GG 2505. Available only to students in Programme Year 4.

Note(s): To develop a wider knowledge, understanding, and appreciation for past, present, and future issues that face coastal communities around the world.

A selection of the most important past, present and future coastal and marine issues facing society around the world will be explored by staff and students. Some typical examples might be: the impact of sea level rise and climate change on coastal communities around the world; coastal disasters such as hurricanes and tsunami on coastal settlements eg, New Orleans, Indonesia; current technologies for monitoring, mapping and modelling the marine and coastal environment; renewable energies such as wind and wave power and their impact on the environment; the environmental impact of offshore gas and oil exploration activities and the development of future unmanned platforms; tools for the effective management of the coast eg, Marine Spatial Planning (MSP); implementing European legislation eg, the Water Framework Directive; the role of coastal fora in management of the UK coast; capacity building in ICZM; the sustainable coast; the role of European funding projects in the future of coastal management; implementing a spatial data infrastructure (SDI) for data collection and sharing; linking science and policy, etc.

Introductory lectures to guide independent study, plus seminars (four in total) with student presentations. Additional sessions may be arranged and guest speakers brought in to support some topics.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment: 3 short essays/reports (60%) and 1 seminar presentation (40%).

Resit: No resit possible.

GG4538
DISSERTATION
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Ms L Philip

Pre-requisite(s): GG 3547 available only to candidates for Honours in BSc Marine and Coastal Resource Management.

Personal research supported by formal introduction to research methods (in associated course) and by regular supervision.

Submission of dissertation (including original work) on topic approved by Head of Geography and Environment.