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CENTRE FOR LIFELONG LEARNING - SCOTTISH ARCHAEOLOGY

> Level 1
KL 105J
INTRODUCTION TO SCOTTISH ARCHAEOLOGY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): None

This course provides an introduction to the study of Archaeology and is aimed at those with no knowledge of the subject. It will provide an introduction to the scope of archaeology, and will introduce students to the history and organisation of the subject as well as looking at the range of archaeological techniques.

6 fortnightly classes of one-and-a-half hours - times may vary. Private study with learning support materials and a full-day excursion.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour examination paper (40%) and 2 assignments (60%)

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Resit: 1 two-hour examination paper (40%) and 2 assignments (60%).
Resit: 1 two-hour examination paper (40%) and 2 assignments (60%).

KL 155K
INTRODUCTION TO PREHISTORIC SCOTLAND
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): KL105J Introduction to Scottish Archaeology

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): Satisfactory completion of this course is compulsory for the Certificate/Diploma and Degree in Scottish Archaeology

This course provides a chronological review, from the Palaeolithic to the early Iron Age, of sites and artefacts in Scotland North of the Forth-Clyde line. Against the background of the changing environment, it covers the development of Mesolithic hunter-gatherer societies after the end of the Ice Age, the arrival of farming and monuments in the Neolithic, and the impact of Bronze Age and Iron Age technologies on society. It also considers the evidence for the arrival of Celtic speakers and an examination of how sites may appear and survive in different land use regimes. Emphasis will be placed on changing interpretations of the major types of site. A field excursion will introduce training in identifying sites of different types.

6 One and a half hour video conference lecture/tutorial sessions and one full day excursion.
Exercises in the course workbook
Field work and directed learning

Continuous assessment: One essay (1200 words), one field trip report (1200 words plus diagrams)(60%)
One end of course assessment (40%)


One paper equivalent to the end of course assessment

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Tutorials involve an element of group discussion of questions posed in the course workbook. These discussions enable students to test their knowledge and understanding of the subject.

As the course is delivered flexibly, and many students are not present in person, most formative feedback is done by e mail exchanges with the course tutor or programme co-ordinator.
Feedback on summative assessments is provided on Assignment Feedback Forms. One copy of these is retained in the Centre, the other is returned to the student with a copy of the work submitted. These forms give feedback (on a scale of 1 - 5) for Focus on topic, Content, Argument, Structure, Use of learning resources, Referencing & quotations, Language skills, presentation and use of visuals as well as having a section where students are told how they might have improved. The schedule for feedback is such that students have summative feedback before they need to submit their next piece of work.

KL 155L
ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELDWORK: PORTFOLIO 1 INTRODUCTION
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): 15 credit points from Archaeology courses in Scottish Archaeology or Scottish Cultural Studies programmes of courses.

Introductory sessions will assist students to identify appropriate Scottish archaeological projects which they can join over the summer, and brief them on the requirements for the submission of an Archaeology Fieldwork Portfolio based on their participation in such projects. Subsequent sessions will assist them in developing techniques of archaeological recording and presentation including film illustration, drawing plans, and photography.

4 fortnightly classes of one-and-a-half hourse - times may vary. Private study with learning support materials.

1st Attempt: Practical exercises (100%)
Resit: Resubmission of practical exercises (100%)

 

> Level 2
KL 205K
ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELDWORK PORTFOLIO 2
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): KL 105B / KL 155B Archaeological Fieldwork Portfolio 1.

Note(s): This course is available in session 2009/10 in the first half-session as KL 205K.

The course supports students in preparing for the submission of a portfolio based on attendance at one or more archaeological projects. The portfolio topic and the specific project(s) on which the portfolio is based must be approved in advance by the course tutor, and approval will depend on the portfolio proposed being clearly distinct from any work submitted for any previous fieldwork portfolio course. In the portfolio submitted, students will be expected to demonstrate competence in recording techniques by including illustrations of finds, plans and photographs, as well as a critique of the projects which have been attended. The seminars which support the course are designed to enable students to display in their portfolio work more advanced presentation and editorial skills.

4 fortnightly classes of one-and-a-half-hours – times may vary.

1st Attempt: Fieldwork Portfolio (100%).

Resit: Resubmission of portfolio following review and rewriting (100%).

KL 205N
ARCHAEOLOGICAL METHODS AND TECHNIQUES: PROSPECTION
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): KL 1059 / KL 1559 Introduction to Archaeology or KL 1058 / KL 1558 Archaeological Identification: Prehistoric Scotland.

Note(s): This course is available in session 2012/13 in the first half-session as KL 205N.

This course will cover the use of documentary, map and aerial photographic sources to research archaeological sites and areas. It will provide a basic understanding of fieldwork prospection techniques including fieldwalking, geophysical survey, and ground-based radar.

6 fortnightly classes of one-and-a-half-hours – times may vary. Private study with learning support materials and a full-day excursion.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour examination paper (40%) and 1 assignment (60%).

Resit: 1 two-hour examination paper (40%) and 1 assignment (60%).

KL 2094
ARCHAEOLOGY OF SCOTLAND IN THE HISTORIC PERIOD
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): KL105J Introduction to Scottish Archaeology KL155H Introduction to Prehistoric Scotland

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): Satisfactory completion of this course is compulsory for the Certificate/Diploma and Degree in Scottish Archaeology

This course covers Scottish archaeology during the Late Iron Age, the Roman Occupation, the Pictish/Scottish periods and the Middle Ages ? roughly the first 1500 years AD. The major types of sites and finds will be reviewed, the ways in which chronologies are derived for them considered, and current interpretations discussed. This will be accompanied by a discussion of the interplay between History and Archaeology, and how this changes between periods. The recognition of sites and finds in the field is emphasized, and underpinned by a course excursion. Students should be available to attend a one day excursion. These will be arranged at a number of venues ? alternative study may be possible.

6 One and a half hour video conference lecture/tutorial sessions and one full day excursion.
Exercises in the course workbook
Field work and directed learning

Continuous assessment: One essay (1200 words), one field trip report (1200 words plus diagrams)(60%)
One two hour examination (40%)

Resit examination

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Tutorials involve an element of group discussion of questions posed in the course workbook. These discussions enable students to test their knowledge and understanding of the subject.

As the course is delivered flexibly, and many students are not present in person, most formative feedback is done by e mail exchanges with the course tutor or programme co-ordinator.
Feedback on summative assessments is provided on Assignment Feedback Forms. One copy of these is retained in the Centre, the other is returned to the student with a copy of the work submitted. These forms give feedback (on a scale of 1 - 5) for Focus on topic, Content, Argument, Structure, Use of learning resources, Referencing & quotations, Language skills, presentation and use of visuals as well as having a section where students are told how they might have improved. The schedule for feedback is such that students have summative feedback before they need to submit their next piece of work.

KL 255M
SCOTLAND'S ARCHAEOLOGICAL HERITAGE
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): 20 credit points from Archaeology or Scottish Cultural Studies programmes of courses.

Note(s): This course is available in the second half-session of 2010/11 as KL 255M.

The course explores the nature of the archaeological heritage resource and the framework for its protection and management in local areas of northern Scotland. Different types of heritage presentation will then be examined through case study and study visits chosen to:-

  • encourage wider understanding of the issues affecting the preservation of the archaeological heritage and those of conservation versus access.

  • explore how heritage sites and collections can enhance intellectual access by recreational visits and contribute to a locality’s economy and tourist potential. Students will be encouraged to undertake directed study projects on topics relating to heritage sites or museum collections in their local area. The sites visited and studied will be determined by the locality where the course is taught.

6 fortnightly classes of one-and-a-half-hours – times may vary. Private study with learning support materials.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (40%) and in-course assessment (60%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (40%) and in-course assessment (60%).

KL 255P
ARCHAEOLOGOCAL METHODS AND TECHNIQUES: RECORDING AND ANALYSIS
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): KL 205D / KL 255D Archaeological Methods and Techniques: Prospection.

Note(s): This course is available in session 2008/09 in the second half-session as KL 255P.

This course will provide an introduction to the principles and methodologies of non-destructive recording, excavation and post-excavation analysis. Recording by a watching brief conducted on development projects in a rescue archaeology context will be included. Lectures from specialists will be contributed.

6 fortnightly classes of one and three quarter hours – times may vary. Private study with learning support materials.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour examination paper (40%) and 1 assignment (60%).

Resit: 1 two-hour examination paper (40%) and 1 assignment (60%).

 

> Level 3
KL 303H / KL 353H
LOCAL HISTORY DISSERTATION
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): KL 1049 / KL 1549 How to Study Local History: A foundation Skills Course KL 2041 / KL 2541 Local History Dissertation with Group Instruction. A total of at least 90 credits at level 2 or above.

Note(s): Students taking Local History Dissertation are each allocated a supervisor, and develop their work under the personal supervision of the nominated individual.

The topic selected can, by agreement with the Programme Co-ordinator, develop research areas studied in Local History Dissertation with Group Instruction.

This course provides an opportunity for students interested in Local History to apply and expand upon the skills and techniques developed in courses, such as 'How to Study Local History: A Foundation Skills Course' and 'Local History Dissertation with Group Instruction' in pursuing independent supervised research studies of their local areas.

Each student will be assigned a supervisor, who will make available regular consultation times. Meetings can be face to face or by telephone and e mail as appropriate.

1st Attempt: Submission of a dissertation of c8,000 words - including appendices and illustrations (100%).

Resit: Resubmission of the dissertation following feedback.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Discussions with the supervisor enable students to test their knowledge and understanding of the subject as their work progresses.

As the course is delivered flexibly, and many students are not present in person, most formative feedback is done by telephone/e mail exchanges with the supervisor.
Summative assessments is provided on completion of the dissertation in the form of a report. Supervisors are requested to give feedback for Focus on topic, Content, Argument, Structure, Use of learning resources, Referencing & quotations, Language skills, presentation and use of visuals as well as indicating how students might have improved. The schedule for feedback is such that students have summative feedback before they submit their dissertation.

KL 3052
ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELDWORK: PORTFOLIO 3
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Donald Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): KL205K for those studying towards a qualification in Scottish Archaeology. For those studying towards the Degree in Archaeology by flexible study, permission of the Head of Archaeology is required.

Co-requisite(s): None.

At least 80 hours active participation as part of a team in an approved excavation
Collection of data, photographs, sketches, maps and diagrams as appropriate
Communication of the results of this participation in a 2000 - 3000 word Portfolio (exclusive of appendices)

80 Hours participation in an approved excavation
4 One and a half hour video conference lecture/tutorial sessions

Presentation of a portfolio in the manner used in Archaeological Fieldwork Portfolio 2 (KL205K) and following discussion with the tutor and fellow class members during the tutorial sessions

Resubmission with changes following feedback from the Tutor and Exam Board

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Feedback by the excavation director/field assistants during the excavation, and feedback from the tutor (and classmates) during the tutorial sessions

During the excavation, students are given advice, assistance and feedback from the excavation team.

Thereafter, in assembling the Portfolio, as the course is delivered flexibly, and many students are not present in person, most feedback is done in the tutorial sessions or by e mail exchanges with the course tutor.

KL 305K
SUBMERGED LANDSCAPES
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Caroline Wickham-Jones

Pre-requisite(s): At least 90 credits at level 2 from courses in Archaeology or Scottish Archaeology

Note(s): Satisfactory completion of this course is compulsory for the Certificate/Diplima and Degree in Scottish Archaeology.

  • General Introduction.

  • Relative sea-level change around Scotland.

  • Mechanics of site submegence and survival.

  • Techniques for the study of submerged sites and landscapes.

  • Management of submerged sites and landscapes: threats, fragility and archaeological potential.

  • Current national and international legislation

  • Current national and international guidelines.

  • Submerged archaeology worldwide and in the UK - a general overview with special emphasis on key sites and on-going projects.

  • Critical discussion of the role of submerged archaeology within archaeological interpretation.

  • There will be an emphasis on inter-disciplinary work in the geo-sciences.

  • Students will carry out a critical review of one submerged archaeology project (likely to be drawn from the UK but tailored to an individual student's experience and interest), and discuss their work in a class presentation.

6 ninety minute seminar workshops fortnightly, plus directed learning including three separate discussion tutorials relatin to the review of individual projects.

1st Attempt: 2 X 1500 word essays (60%); 1 written exam (40%).

Resit: The essay marks will be carried forward.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Tutorials involve an element of group discussion of questions posed in the course workbook. These discussions enable students to test their knowledge and understanding of the subject.

As the course is delivered flexibly, and many students are not present in person, most formative feedbackin done by email exchanges with the course tutor or programme co-ordinator.

Feedback on summative assessments is provided on Assignment Feedback Forms. One copy of these is retained in the Centre, the other is returned to the student with a copy of the work submitted. These forms give feedback (on a scale of 1-5) for Focus on topic, Content, Argument, Structure, Use of learning resources, Referencing & quotations, Language skills, presentation and use of visuals as well as having a section where students are told how they might have improved. The schedule for feedback is such that students have summative feedback before they need to submit their next piece of work.

KL 3553
ARCHAEOLOGY DISSERTATION: INTRODUCTION
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): 120 credits at level 2 of which 60 must come from Archaeology and/or Scottish Archaeology courses and KL 3050 / KL 3550 Archaeological Theory.

The course has three distinct stages:

  • Stage 1: PROJECT PROPOSAL: students will consider possible projects, considering their aims, the scope of the project, the available literature and key work in the area. Following a brief discussion with the course tutor, each student will be requested to focus the project structure from the "general" to the "specific" prior to the appointment of a supervisor. The end of stage 1 is the submission of a project proposal.

  • Stage 2: REPORT ON PREVIOUS WORK. The second stage is a 500 word literature review. This should be kept brief, and can be done as bullet points under headings such as: Previous work on topic (excavation reports etc).
    Other relevant work (period syntheses, theoretical and methodological work).

  • Stage 3: DISSERTATION PLAN
    The final stage is the writing of a dissertation plan (1,000 words). This is a more detailed elaboration of the initial proposal, but will incorporate a statement (about 300 words) summarising why the problem/project is worth pursuing (including a list of references read); what the study aims to do and why; how it will be done and what techniques will be used to obtain and analyse the anticipated data; a programme of work should be included.

    At this stage, students must also estimate what facilities might be required to assist in their Dissertation work and establish that these facilities are available.

4 Ninety minute group seminar workshops fortnightly, interspersed with meetings/telephone conference calls with students either singly or in small groups as their work progresses , plus directed learning.

1st Attempt: Three submitted pieces of work: Project Porposal (c 500 words); Report on previous work (c500 words); Dissertation Plan (c 1,000 words) Equally weighted 100%.

Resit: Resubmission of failing section.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment takes place in the group tutorials which involve an element of group discussion on topics proposed.

As the course is delivered flexibly, and many students are not present in person, most formative feedback is done by e mail exchanges with the course tutor or programme co-ordinator.

Feedback on summative assessments is provided on assessment section of MyAberdeen, where all written work is submitted. Tutors are requested to give feedback for Focus on topic, Content, Argument, Structure, Use of learning resources, Referencing & quotations. The schedule for feedback is such that students have summative feedback before they need to submit their next piece of work.

KL 35D1
THE PREHISTORY OF ORKNEY 4000BC - 500AD
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): 120 credits at level 2 of which 60 must come from Archaeology and/or Scottish Archaeology courses.

Note(s): Students completing the course at level 3 cannot at a later date take the same course at a different level as part of a graduating curriculum.

At the discretion of the Advisors of study, this course may be taken as an elective by full time students of Archaeology.

This course covers the prehistory of Orkney from roughly 8000BC to AD 500, from the earliest settlement, through the Neolithic, Bronze and early Iron Ages, up to the advent of written historical sources. Case studies of selected archaeological sites, varied in period, type and purpose, present the characteristics of each period, with an emphasis throughout on the wider themes of continuity and change, internal and external diffusion of ideas and technology, and human impact on the landscape. The designation of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage site will provide an added focus to discussions both from the point of view of the importance of the Neolithic remains and from the point of view of the impact of a World Heritage designation on issues such as general archaeological research and tourist pressure on the sites.

6 Ninety minute seminar workshops fortnightly, plus directed learning.

1st Attempt: Two 1,500-2,000 word essays (60%); 1 two-hour written exam (40%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Tutorials involve an element of group discussion of questions posed in the course workbook. These discussions enable students to test their knowledge and understanding of the subject.

As the course is delivered flexibly, and many students are not present in person, most formative feedback is done by e mail exchanges with the course tutor or programme co-ordinator.

Feedback on summative assessments is provided on assessment section of MyAberdeen, where all written work is submitted. Tutors are requested to give feedback for Focus on topic, Content, Argument, Structure, Use of learning resources, Referencing & quotations, Language skills, presentation and use of visuals as well as indicating how students might have improved. The schedule for feedback is such that students have summative feedback before they need to submit their next piece of work.

KL 3956
ARCHAEOLOGY ILLUSTRATION SUMMER SCHOOL
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr Donald Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): 120 credits at level 2 of which 60 must come from Archaeology and/or Scottish Archaeology courses.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Students will participate in one field visit to be shown and to practice the techniques of site sketching and drawing monuments, and, if possible a plan of an excavation. Thereafter, based in the museum, they will be shown how to draw a wide range of artefacts, adding scale, shape etc to their drawings.

During the personal study time during and following the course, students are expected to prepare inked drawings from the pencil ones done in class or on the excursion to the standard required for publication and to research the background to the sites, monuments and artefacts drawn. The final portfolio, submitted c3 weeks after the end of the course should contain a full report on each item/site illustrated along with the final inked illustrations and pencil drafts. The report will include a written description of the background to the site/monument/artefacts, a review of the archaeological significance, a summary of any excavations carried out or where the finds were made and the rough and final drawings.

Texts used in the class include:
Hazel Martingell and Alan Saville (1988) The Illustration of Lithic Artefacts: A Guide to Drawing Stone Tools for Specialist Reports
Lesley and Roy Adkins (1989) Archaeological Illustration.

Demonstrations of each of the techniques to be used, followed by hands on practice.

1st Attempt: A portfolio of 6 pieces of work completed in the summer school.

Resit: Resubmission of failing pieces of work following the exam board.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative feedbcak will be given at all stages as work proceeds.

Formative feedback will be given orally during the course. Summative feedback will be given in the form of a written report on the strengths and weaknesses of the portfolio following the exam board.

 

> Level 4

PLEASE NOTE: Resit: (for Honours students only): Candidates achieving a CAS mark of 6-8 may be awarded compensatory level 1 credit. Candidates achieving a CAS mark of less than 6 will be required to submit themselves for re-assessment and should contact the Course Co-ordinator for further details.

KL 4032 / KL 4532
SCOTTISH CULTURE: SPECIAL SUBJECT 1/SCOTTISH CULTURE: SPECIAL SUBJECT 2
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): 90 credits at level 3 from Scottish Studies and/or Scottish Archaeology courses.

Note(s): Students taking Special Subject 1 or 2 are each allocated a supervisor, and develop their work under the personal supervision of the nominated individual.

The topic chosen for KL 4530 Special Subject II can, by agreement with the Programme Co-ordinator, be on a topic related to that studied in KL 4030.

An intensive study of a limited Scottish theme, topic, period or problem based on primary sources and other relevant material to allow students to pursue a programme of reading and analysis of a specific subject area with the support, guidance and direction of an academic well-versed in the subject. It may be used to develop themes encountered in previous study, but will also allow wide reading around a subject, which may provide the focus for the dissertation. Precise subjects are determined in consultation with staff and identified student interest.

Each student will be assigned a supervisor, who will make available regular consultation times. Meetings can be face to face or by telephone and e mail as appropriate.

1st Attempt: A dissertation of 8,000-9,000 words.

Resit: Resubmission of the dissertation following feedback.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Discussions with the supervisor enable students to test their knowledge and understanding of the subject as their work progresses.

As the course is delivered flexibly, and many students are not present in person, most formative feedback is done by telephone/e mail exchanges with the supervisor.

Summative assessments is provided on completion of the dissertation in the form of a report. Tutors are requested to give feedback for Focus on topic, Content, Argument, Structure, Use of learning resources, Referencing & quotations, Language skills, presentation and use of visuals as well as indicating how students might have improved. The schedule for feedback is such that students have summative feedback before they submit their dissertation.

KL 4051
ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELDWORK: PORTFOLIO 4
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): KL 3052 / KL 3552 Archaeological Fieldwork Portfolio 3 and KL 3050 / KL 3550 Archaeological Theory.

The course supports students in preparing for the submission of a portfolio based on attendance at one or more archaeological projects – these can be field or museum based. The portfolio topic and the specific project(s) on which the portfolio is based must be approved in advance by the course tutor. Approval will depend on the portfolio proposed being clearly distinct from any work submitted for any previous fieldwork portfolio course. Building on Portfolios 2 and 3, Portfolio 4 will put more emphasis on a critical appreciation of the nature of archaeological fieldwork. Students will be expected to consider a fieldwork project within the broader framework of the history and theory of archaeology, discuss the roles of participants in the project and consider alternative approaches to fieldwork methodologies.

4 fortnightly classes of one-and-a-half-hours – times may vary.

1st Attempt: Fieldwork Portfolio (100%).

KL 4054
ARCHAEOLOGY DISSERTATION
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): 120 credits at level 2 of which 60 must come from Archaeology and/or Scottish Archaeology courses KL 3050 / KL 3550 "Archaeological Theory" KL 3553 "Archaeology Dissertation: Introduction"

The Dissertation is built around individual research and consultation with a dissertation supervisor. The Dissertation course book provides a guide to what is expected and how the process will work. The course is based mainly on individual research, the progress of that research and the sharing of the process and results. Following the plan agreed in KL 3553 "Archaeology Dissertation: Introduction" sessions will include guidance and instruction on the preparation of a research project. It will include guidance on keeping a research diary, collection of data and other relevant information, and the organisation and collation of this information. Students will be supported in the construction and writing of the resulting dissertation, the methods of referencing and relaying data.

Individual sessions face to face or by telephone conference with the supervisor and e mail exchanges.

1st Attempt: 8,000-10,000 words inc figures and diagrams.

Resit: Resubmission with corrections as advised by the exam board.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Regular feedback following discussions with supervisor.

Formative feedback is done by e mail exchanges and face to face meetings/telephone calls with the supervisor.

The supervisor is requested to give feedback for Focus on topic, Content, Argument, Structure, Use of learning resources, Referencing & quotations, Language skills, presentation and use of visuals as well as indicating how students might have improved.

KL 4055
SUBMERGED LANDSCAPES
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Caroline Wickham-Jones

Pre-requisite(s): At least 30 credits at level 3 from courses in Archaeology or Scottish Archaeology

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): Satisfactory completion of this course is compulsory for the Certificate/Diploma and Degree in Scottish Archaeology

General introduction,
Relative sea-level change around Scotland,
Mechanics of site submergence and survival,
Techniques for the study of submerged sites and landscapes
Management of submerged sites and landscapes: threats, fragility and archaeological potential
Current national and international legislation
Current national and international guidelines
Submerged archaeology worldwide and in the UK - a general overview with special emphasis on key sites, and on-going projects
Critical discussion of the role of submerged archaeology within archaeological interpretation.
There will be an emphasis on inter-disciplinary work in the geo-sciences.
Students will carry out a critical review of one submerged archaeology project (likely to be drawn from the UK but tailored to an individual student?s experience and interest), and discuss their work in a class presentation

6 ninety minute seminar workshops fortnightly, plus directed learning including three separate discussion tutorials relating to the review of individual projects.

2 x 2000 word essays (60%); 1 two hour written exam (40%)
The exam paper will be more advanced than Level 3, requiring a more critical engagement with the course material.


Resit examination
The essay marks will be carried forward

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Tutorials involve an element of group discussion of questions posed in the course workbook. These discussions enable students to test their knowledge and understanding of the subject.

As the course is delivered flexibly, and many students are not present in person, most formative feedback is done by e mail exchanges with the course tutor or programme co-ordinator.
Feedback on summative assessments is provided on Assignment Feedback Forms. One copy of these is retained in the Centre, the other is returned to the student with a copy of the work submitted. These forms give feedback (on a scale of 1 - 5) for Focus on topic, Content, Argument, Structure, Use of learning resources, Referencing & quotations, Language skills, presentation and use of visuals as well as having a section where students are told how they might have improved. The schedule for feedback is such that students have summative feedback before they need to submit their next piece of work.

KL 4541 / KL 3541
VIKING ARCHAEOLOGY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr K Milek

Pre-requisite(s): None although at least one Archaeology course at level 1 or 2 is recommended.

Note(s): ** COURSE NOT AVAILABLE IN 2012/2013 **

This course may NOT be included in a graduating curriculum with AY 4509. Students will be asked to make a contribution towards the cost of a field trip to the National Museum of Scotland, in Edinburgh.

This course provides students with an overview of the Viking Age peoples of Scandinavia, and their dramatic expansion in the 8th-11th centuries AD. We will review the archaeological evidence for population and settlement patterns, ethnicity and social structure, the development of urban centres and commerce, and Viking Age religion, and will chart the political process that led to the rise of the modern nation states of Norway, Sweden and Denmark. This Scandinavian background will then be set in the wider context of the Viking diaspora, examining Norse contact, conflict, trade and colonisation from Canada in the West to the Asian steppe in the East.

2 one-hour lectures per week (excluding reading weeks), 3 one-hour practical workshops, a one-day field trip to the National Museum of Scotland, and 2 two-hour seminars.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); coursework (50%) in the form of a 3,000-word essay (30%) and an artefact project presented in the form of an A0 poster representing the backboard of a museum display (20%).

Resit: Marks from continuous assessment to be carried forward (50%); 1 two-hour written examination (50%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment is provided for a mock-up of the Viking artefact display board, and during the seminars.
Formative assessment on artefact project proposals is provided using MyAberdeen's assignment feedback form. Summative feedback is provided on detailed essay and project feedback forms, and some specific notes may be written on the assignments themselves.

KL 45D1
THE PREHISTORY OF ORKNEY 4000BC - 500AD
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): 120 credits at level 2 of which 60 must come from Archaeology and/or Scottish Archaeology courses.

Note(s): Students completing the course at level 3 cannot at a later date take the same course at a different level as part of a graduating curriculum.

At the discretion of the Advisors of study, this course may be taken as an elective by full time students of Archaeology.

This course covers the prehistory of Orkney from roughly 8000BC to AD 500, from the earliest settlement, through the Neolithic, Bronze and early Iron Ages, up to the advent of written historical sources. Case studies of selected archaeological sites, varied in period, type and purpose, present the characteristics of each period, with an emphasis throughout on the wider themes of continuity and change, internal and external diffusion of ideas and technology, and human impact on the landscape. The designation of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage site will provide an added focus to discussions both from the point of view of the importance of the Neolithic remains and from the point of view of the impact of a World Heritage designation on issues such as general archaeological research and tourist pressure on the sites.

6 Ninety minute seminar workshops fortnightly, plus directed learning.

For those taking the course at level 4, directed learning including three extra separate discussion tutorials relating to the review of individual projects where students will each make a presentation.

1st Attempt: Two 1,500-2,000 word essays (60%); 1 two-hour written exam (40%).

The exam paper at level 4 will be more advanced than Level 3, requiring a more critical engagement with the course material.

Resit: Examination
The essay marks will be carried forward.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Tutorials involve an element of group discussion of questions posed in the course workbook. These discussions enable students to test their knowledge and understanding of the subject.

As the course is delivered flexibly, and many students are not present in person, most formative feedback is done by e mail exchanges with the course tutor or programme co-ordinator.

Feedback on summative assessments is provided on assessment section of MyAberdeen, where all written work is submitted. Tutors are requested to give feedback for Focus on topic, Content, Argument, Structure, Use of learning resources, Referencing & quotations, Language skills, presentation and use of visuals as well as indicating how students might have improved. The schedule for feedback is such that students have summative feedback before they need to submit their next piece of work.