University of Aberdeen Takes you to the main page for this section

CENTRE FOR LIFELONG LEARNING - SCIENCE

> Level 1
KL 1070
CHEMISTRY FOR THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES I
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr W Harrison

Pre-requisite(s): SQA Higher in Chemistry at B or better,or GCE A Level in Chemistry, or equivalent qualification. Other qualifications with permission of the course co-ordinator.

Co-requisite(s): As specified in the University Calendar for certain degree programs, otherwise none.

Note(s): Students who intend to continue with Chemistry beyond level 1 and who do not have a mathematics pass at Higher or A-level are recommended to take the Introductory Mathematics courses MA 0000 and MA 0000.

This course provides a grounding in the foundations of chemical science, with emphasis on the applications of chemistry in physical sciences and engineering. The course includes a review of the basic concepts and langauge of chemistry, quantitative chemical calculations, atomic structure, the periodic table, and chemical bonding. The section on organic chemistry describes structural and stereochemical aspects and simple functional groups, and the section on physical chemistry includes study of the gas laws, heats of reaction and the energetics of chemical processes.

Two one-hour lectures (times TBA) and one one-hour class workshop (time TBA) per week. Six fortnightly 3-hour laboratory classes (times TBA).

1st Attempt: One two-hour written examination (50%), continuous assessment (30%) and lab work (20%).

Resit: One two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Marks for lab experiment follow-up tests and MyAberdeen assignments available as soon as possible after the assessments. Informal discussion with students in lab sessions. All of the course team have "open door" policies for meeting students.

KL 107S
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Sally Middleton

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): Students should not take this course if they are currently registered for, or have already obtained credit points in Tools for Science (KL107F).

As well as basic concepts it will introduce the more advanced concepts associated with long documents such as section breaks, table of contents and index. It will also introduce the concept of macros and if statements and construction of graphs using spreadsheets.

Lectures are recorded and uploaded onto MyAberdeen.
Regular access to a networked computer and broadband is also highly recommended.

A headset (compulsory) and webcam (optional) will be required for online tutorials. Students will be responsible for providing their own computing equipment and consumables.

1st Attempt: One one-and-half hour examination (25%); continuous assessment (consisting of 3 practicals) (75%).

Resit: Candidates only resit those components which they have failed (CAS <9) at first attempt. Multiple choice examination (25%) at resit is 1.5 hours, practical assessments are 45 minutes each.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Feedback will be provided by the dedicated tutor.

KL 107Y
GLOBAL WORLDS, GLOBAL CHALLENGES
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): This course may NOT be included in a graduating curriculum with GG 1005, GG 1006 or GC 1001, or KL equivalents.

Related study blocks will address:

How the planet works? The interdependence of natural and human systems: interaction of atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, lithosphere, world cultures, economic and political systems.

Global environmental change. Atmosphere and oceans. The relationships between land cover and land use, population, and development. Political, economic and ethical consequences.

Resources, development and environmental degradation. Natural resources as the foundation of prosperity and human well-being. Agricultural and industrial development, social and environmental justice.

Energy. The science, technology, politics and economics of fossil fuels and alternative energy sources.

Globalisation, society and lifestyles. What are the impacts of global economic and technological change? What is sustainable development and is it achievable?

Regular access to a networked computer and broadband is also highly recommended.

A headset (compulsory) and webcam (optional) will be required for online tutorials. Students will be responsible for providing their own computing equipment and consumables.


This course will be delivered independently through MyAberdeen. Students will be provided with recordings of the two, one-hour lectures a week and the workshops will be delivered through a mixture of MyAberdeen and an intensive practical day.

1st Attempt:

For students who complete the coursework to a satisfactory standard: coursework, 100%. These students will obtain exemption from the degree exam, and their coursework mark will provide the overall course CAS mark.

For students who do not obtain exemption from the degree exam: coursework, 50% plus exam, 50%.

Resit: Original coursework carried forward, 50%, plus exam, 50%.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

KL 107Z / KL 197Z
THE DYNAMIC PLANET
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Sally Middleton

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): This course is available in both the first half session and through the Summer

The geological timescale
Relative dating and Uniformitarianism
Sedimentary deposits and way up
Sequence deposits and way up
Sequence and bio-stratigraphy
Palaeontology
Geohazards
Absolute dating
Topography
The interior of the Earth
P and S waves
Plate tectonics and the Wilson cycle

This course will be delivered independently through MyAberdeen.

1st Attempt: 100% continuous assessment (continuous assessment (50%)and end of course assessment (50%)).

Resit: 1 paper equivalent to end of course assessment (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Tutorial style chat sessions delivered weekly.

Weekly chat sessions will allow feedback through the duration of the course.

KL 108W
THE PHYSICAL UNIVERSE A
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

Pre-requisite(s): SCE H in Mathematics and Physics, or equivalent.

Note(s): Two of the practicals are optical and as such they may be difficult to complete if the student is blind/partially sighted. However the practicals are carried out in groups of two (or occasionally three). Hence, in this instance the work would be carried out in a group of three so that the tasks can be shared appropriately.

The course will be delivered independently through MyAberdeen however, students will be given the option of attending the 2 one-hour lectures per week. There will be a compulsory on campus practical weekend.

The course lays emphasis on how a relatively few fundamental laws enable us to understand a very wide range of phenomena that occur both naturally and as a result of mankind's activities. In particular, you will see how Newton's laws of motion lets us understand a variety of linear and circular motion; how the properties of matter can be characterised and how physics can be usefully applied in the fields of planetary motion, sport, the environment and medicine. The course will also describe how some of the most important ideas in modern physics grew from unexpected observations.

1st Attempt: Final two-hour multiple choice exam (50%), completion of practical class notebook and laboratory reports (25%), tutorial sheets (12.5%), multiple choice tests during term (12.5%).

Resit: Final two-hour multiple choice exam (50%), completion of practical class notebook and laboratory reports (25%), tutorial sheets (12.5%), multiple choice tests during term (12.5%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

On-line software for solving Physics problems (eg Mastering Physics software or equivalent).

Tutorial sheets, term multiple choice exams and lab notebooks will be marked and returned within two weeks of submission. Mastering Physics software gives an immediate on-line feedback.

KL 108Y
GRAND CHALLENGE OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

The first part of the course overviews important problems in AI (for example Natural Language Processing, Computer Vision, and Robotics), and a number of techniques which are used to tackle these problems (for example search, neural networks, and reinforcement learning). The second part of the course looks at relevant areas of Cognitive Science, including Psychology, Linguistics, Neuroscience and Philosophy. Finally the course looks at the history of AI and possible future scenarios

There will be 2 x one hour recorded lectures uploaded onto MyAberdeen, and one 2 hour online practical, per week.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment: a series of short tests in practical sessions (25%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forward (25%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

KL 108Z
WEB APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

Pre-requisite(s):

Co-requisite(s): As specified in the University Calendar for certain degree programs, otherwise none.

Note(s): i) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator. ii) This course can not be taken in a graduating curriculum with CS 1516 or CS 1519 or KL equivalents.

This course teaches students about programming in general, and programming for the internet in particular. It also teaches students the basics of database driven web applications.

Topics will include:

a) programming using a scripting language, including objects, methods, control structures, data types and collections;
b) programming for the internet, including forms, application logic, database programming, and interaction with other applications using Web 2.0 technology such as Google Maps.

This course will be delivered independently through MyAberdeen. Students will be provided with recordings of the 2, one hour lectures a week. The 1 two-hour practical a week is delivered through MyAberdeen.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment (50%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forward (25%). Continuous assessment consists of programming tasks.

KL 109D
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING AND PRINCIPLES
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Sally Middleton

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): i) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/conputer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

The course will cover the basic principles of computer programming consisting of topics such as the following:

  • Fundamental programming concepts including variables and scope, conditional statements, and iteration.
  • Pseudocode. Fundamental algorithms including simple sorting and searching, and data structures including arrays.

  • Boolean algebra, logic, set theory and proof. Relations, functions, combinatorics, graphs.

2 x 1 hour recorded on-line lectures and uploaded onto MyAberdeen, 1 x 2 hour online practical per week.

1st Attempt: one two-hour written examination (75%); Continuous Assessment (25%).

Resit: 1 two hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forward.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunies and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

KL 157I
ASTRONOMY AND METEOROLOGY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

Pre-requisite(s): TS 1002, KL 107S or equivalent.

A course of general interest providing an introduction to Astronomy. There will be an emphasis on the current knowledge of the solar system but the course will also look at astronomy on a larger scale. Whilst the meterology component will discuss the atmosphere and how its dynamics are driven by the sun, special interest issues such as ozone depletion, climate change and El Nino will be highlighted.

This course will be delivered independently through MyAberdeen. Students will be provided with recordings of the three one-hour lectures a week.

1st Attempt: 1 two hour multiple choice exam (75%), in-course assessment (25%).

Resit: 1 two hour multiple choice exam (75%), in-course assessment (25%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

KL 157V
ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None.

The content includes topics in Ecology: (Biodiversity, Ecological Resources, Population Ecology, Community Ecology, Ecosystem Functioning) and topics in Environmental Science: (Ecosystems and Environment, The Atmosphere and the Oceans, Land Use and the Global Environment, Global Environmental Change - including Climate Change, GMOs, Acid Deposition, Ozone Depletion, Biodegradation of Crude Oils, - Waste Management and the Environment).

This course will be delivered independently through webCT. Students will be provided with recordings of the three one-hour lectures a week and the 5, three hour practicals will be delivered through an intensive practical weekend.

1st Attempt: One 2 hour MCQ exam (60%) and in-course assessment (40%). To complete this course, achieved in both the theory exam and the in-course practical assessments.

To pass this course, a pass must be achieved in both the theory exam and the in-course assessment.

Resit: One 2 hour MCQ exam in the same format as the main exam. The resit paper may contain questions pertaining to both the practical and lecture components of the course.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

KL 157X
PORTRAIT OF A PLANET
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): The nature of the method of delivery of this course and the field trip and practical work may lead to difficulties for students with some disabilities however all possible alternatives will be investigated. Students with disabilities are highly recommended to seek a meeting with the School Disability Coordinator to discuss this further. This course may NOT be included in a graduating curriculum with GL 1005 and GL 1505.

The rocks, of which the rigid, outer shell of the Earth is made, are themselves composed of a range of different minerals. Igneous rocks, which crystallise from rock melts (magma), contain minerals that reflect the processes operating within and at the margins of the plates that form the rigid shell. Metamorphic rocks are formed in response to the forces associated with the movement of the plates and/or to changes in temperatures. The weathering and erosion of pre-existing rock formations and the transport and deposition of this debris by ice, wind, water and gravity form most sedimentary rocks. However, some sedimentary rocks are mainly of biological or chemical origin (e.g. chalk, rock salt). The composition of, and the mineral associations in rocks are therefore directly related to the processes that formed them. The identification and classification of rocks is therefore a crucial skill in studies relating to the evolution of the Earth.

This course will be delivered independently through WebCT, with an intensive practical weekend.

1st Attempt: (100% continuous assessment):

Multiple choice questions (25%)
Laboratory Practical (25%)
Field Trip (25%)
End of course assessment (25%)
Resit: Examination (100%)

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Feedback will be given.

KL 158O
WEB TECHNOLOGY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

Topics will include:

programming using a scripting language, including objects, methods, control structures, data types and collections;

programming for the internet, including forms, application logic, database programming, and interaction with other applications using Web 2.0 technology such as Google Maps.

This course will be delivered independently through MyAberdeen. Students will be provided with recordings of the 2, one hour lectures a week. The 1 one-hour practical a week is delivered through MyAberdeen.

1st Attempt: One 1.5 hour multiple-choice examination (75%) and continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: Candidates only resit those components (multiple-choice examination, practical examinations) which they failed at first attempt. Multiple-choice examination at resit is 1.5 hours.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunies and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessment will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

KL 158S
CHEMISTRY FOR THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES II
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr W Harrison

Pre-requisite(s): Pass in CM 1000 (Chemistry for the Physical Sciences 1).

Co-requisite(s): As specified in the University Calendar for certain degree programs, otherwise none.

  • Theories of chemical bonding of multi-atom molecules, the VSEPR model.


  • The Second Law: entropy, free-energy and equilibrium.


  • Phase equilibria, acid and bases (including buffers).


  • Organic reaction mechanisms: the factors affecting Sn1 and Sn2 reactions, addition reactions, reactinos of aromatic systems.

Two one-hour lectures (times TBA) and one one-hour class workshop (time TBA) per week. Six fortnightly 3-hour laboratory classes (times TBA).

1st Attempt: One two-hour written examination (50%), continuous assessment (on-line multiple choice tests) (30%) and lab work (20%).

Resit: One two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Marks for lab experiment follow-up tests and MyAberdeen assignments available as soon as possible after the assessments. Informal discussion with students in lab sessions. All of the course team have "open door" policies for meeting students.

KL 158Z
THE PHYSICAL UNIVERSE B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

Pre-requisite(s): KL 107W

The course will continue from KL108W Physical Universe A and develop ideas of rotational mechanics including moments of inertia, before going on to explore radiation, types of radiation and radioactivity. Some discussion of topical related issues will also be included. The Electricity and Magnetism component of the course will follow conventional lines for this level, exploring the laws of how charges interact through electrostatic and magnetic forces, how emf may be induced, the operation of capacitors and inductors. Practical sessions will mirror the theoretical content.

2 x one hour recorded lectures uploaded to MyAberdeen per week, and an intensive practical weekend.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour exam (70%), Continuous assessment (tutorials) (15%), Continuous assessment (practicals) (15%).

Resit: 1 two-hour exam (70%), Continuous assessment (tutorials) (15%), Continuous assessment (practials) (15%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Tutorials will monitor student development, whilst lab demonstrators will engage with students at a one to one level not possible in the lecture theatre.

Tutorial sheets, term multiple choice exams and lab notebooks will be marked and returned within two weeks of submission. Mastering Physics software gives an immediate on-line feedback.

KL 159C
COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

  • Basics: Number Systems (Decimal Binary Hexadecimal); Binary Addition; Logic Gates; Transistors; Power Consumption; Boolean Algebra; Multiplexer/Decoders/Timing; Latches and Flip-Flops; Finite State Machines.

  • Building Blocks: Arithmetic Circuits; Number Systems (Fixed-Point, Floating-Point);Memory Arrays; Logic Arrays.
  • Assembly Language, Machine Language: Addressing Modes; Program execution: heaps and stacks.

  • Microarchitecture: Single-Cycle Processor; Multicycle Processor; Pipelined Processor.

  • Memory Systems: Caches; Virtual Memory.

2 x 1 hour recorded lectures uploaded onto MyAberdeen, 1 x 1 hour online practical and 1 x 1 hour online tutorial per week.

1st Attempt: 1 x two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment (20%); practical coursework (30%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment carried forward (50%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Feedback will be provided from the dedicated tutor.

KL 159Y
GLOBAL WORLDS/LOCAL CHALLENGES
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): This course may not be included in a graduating curriculum with GG1506, GG1507, GC1501 or KL equivalents.

This course examines how global processes produce and reflect local-scale changes. Related study blocks will address:
Environmental change and landscape response. Topography, climate, reconstruction of past relationships between humans, plants and animals.
Landscape and society. Environment - opportunity or risk? Resources and hazards as local manifestations of global drivers. People, land, water, soils - who controls what?
Globalisation - the economics and politics of urban industrial change. Agents and scales of change: nations and states; local government; multinational corporations and local entrepreneurialism. Regional development and the post-industrial economy.
New social and cultural spaces. Mobility and difference; poverty and exclusion; imaginative geographies: unequal power relationships; memories, places and nations.

2 x one hour lecture recorded and uploaded onto MyAberdeen per week. A compulsory practical weekend in Aberdeen.

1st Attempt: For students who complete the coursework to a satisfactory standard: coursework, 100%. These students will obtain exemption from the degree exam, and their coursework mark will provide the overall course CAS mark.

For students who do not obtain exemption from the degree exam: coursework, 50% plus exam, 50%.

Resit: Original coursework carried forward, 50%, plus exam, 50%.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Feedback will be provided by dedicated tutor.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information
The course includes a workgroup exercise on assessment of essays. Students must sit a mock exam in-class. However, with just 12 weeks, 6 workgroups and a degree exam exemption system that requires summative assessment of coursework, it is difficult to arrange stand-alone formative assessment. It makes more sense to consider feedback/feedforward in terms of onwards progression: e.g., students write just one coursework essay which is summatively assessed, but comments provided on this should help students to improve their performance next time: e.g., in the follow-up Level 2 courses.

KL 199A
PORTRAIT OF A PLANET
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): This is a 6 week course available through the Summer

The rocks, of which the rigid, outer shell of the Earth is made, are themselves composed of a range of different minerals. Igneous rocks, which crystallise from rock melts (magma), contain minerals that reflect the processes operating within and at the margins of the plates that form the rigid shell. Metamorphic rocks are formed in response to the forces associated with the movement of the plates and/or to changes in temperatures. The weathering and erosion of pre-existing rock formations and the transport and deposition of this debris by ice, wind, water and gravity form most sedimentary rocks. However, some sedimentary rocks are mainly of biological or chemical origin (e.g. chalk, rock salt). The composition of, and the mineral associations in rocks are therefore directly related to the processes that formed them. The identification and classification of rocks is therefore a crucial skill in studies relating to the evolution of the Earth.

This course will be delivered independently through MyAberdeen, with an intensive practical weekend.

1st Attempt: 100% continuous Assessment

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Feedback will be given orally on the day.

 

> Level 2
KL 2074
DATA MANAGEMENT
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Sally Middleton

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): (i) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

  • The concepts of a database and database management. Database development. Illustrations. Entity-Relationship model. Database design: logical design and the relational model. Normalisation; different normal forms. Physical design; file organisation and access; indexing. Database administration. Query by Example and SQL. Query optimisation. Practical examples using MS Access.


  • Client-server model. Database servers. Database access from client applications. Web-based database access through server-side scripting. Practical examples using MS Access, My SQL, Php and JDBC.


  • A brief overview of key concepts in distributed, object -oriented, multimedia, spatial and geo-referenced database systems.

Four hours per week: 2 one hour lectures delivered via recordings, 1 two hour practical delivered remotely all using MyAberdeen.

1st Attempt: 1 two hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%). In order to pass this course, candidates must obtain a pass mark in the examination and in the overal combination of examination and continuous assessment.

Resit: 1 two hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forwards (25%). In order to pass this course, candidates must obtain a pass mark in the examination and in the overal combination of examination and continuous assessment.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During regular chat rooms, student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunies and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during chat sessions.

KL 2075
THE ELECTRONIC SOCIETY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Sally Middleton

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): (i) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

What is the electronic society? What are the human factors involved in engaging in the electronic society? What is the impact of the electronic society on organisations? What impact do E-Technologies have on society? An overview of infrastructure. An introduction to issues: Legal & ethical, security, privacy, intellectual property, software failure, digital divide. Case studies from E-Commerce, E-Health, E-Science and E-Governance. Thse case studies will address, for example, how organisations must change to best utilise emerging technologies, issues of security and privacy in the use of patient data, and the importance of standards in E-Science.

Three hours per week: 2 one hour lectures delivered via recordings mounted on webCT, 1 one hour practical delivered remotely using webCT.

1st Attempt: 1 two hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%). In order to pass this course, candidates must obtain a pass mark in the overall combination of examination and continuous assessment.

Resit: 1 two hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forwards (25%). In order to pass this course, candidates must obtain a pass mark in the overall combination of examination and continuous assessment.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Chat room sessions will provide students with practice opportunies and presentations and debates where feedback from staff will be given.

Feedback for in-course summative assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during tutorial sessions.

KL 208A
ENERGETICS OF CHANGE IN CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL PROCESSES
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

Pre-requisite(s): KL 107R and KL 157M

The course provides a grounding in basics physical chemistry. The principle points include:

  • Thermodynamic parameters: enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs energies.

  • Chemical Kinetics: Zero, 1st and 2nd order reactions, partial and reaction orders and relationship of rate laws to mechanism.

  • Basic principles of electrochemistry including redox chemistry and Nernst equations.
  • 2 one hour lecture, recorded and uploaded to MyAberdeen per week, one 1 hour online tutorial per fortnight and compulsory attendance at Aberdeen based practical weekend.

    1st Attempt: 1 x two-hour written examination (60%), continuous assessment (40%).

    Resit: 1 x two-hour written examination (100%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Formative assessment given during tutorial classes and laboratory classes.

    Marks for lab experiments and MyAberdeen assignments available as soon as possible after the assessments; feedback on wrong answers provided. Informal discussion with students in lab sessions.

    KL 208B
    SHAPES, PROPERTIES AND REACTIONS OF MOLECULES
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

    Pre-requisite(s): KL 107R and KL 157M or on-campus equivalents.

    Co-requisite(s):

    This course provides a grounding in basic inorganic chemistry of the elements. Chemicals structure, and how it affects reactivity will be considered, together with chemical bonding in its various forms.

    Particular emphasis will be placed on structure - activity relationships, including how the addition of catalytic materials can alter the course of chemical reactions.

    Two one-hour recorded lectures per week, one one-hour tutorial per fortnight delivered through MyAberdeen. Intensive Aberdeen based practical weekend.

    1st Attempt: One two-hour written examination (60%), continuous assessment (40%).

    Resit: One two-hour written examination (100%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Formative assessment given during tutorial classes and laboratory classes.

    Marks for lab experiments and MyAberdeen assignments available as soon as possible after the assessments; feedback on wrong answers provided. Informal discussion with students in lab sessions.

    KL 208D
    PLANETARY GEOLOGY
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

    Pre-requisite(s): KL 107Z or KL 197Z or KL157X or KL 199A or KL 107R or KL 157M or KL 108W or KL 158Z or on-campus equivalents

    Distinction between Terrestrial and Jovian planets. Overview of the geology of Earth as a planetary body Geology and age of the Moon Geology of Mars, Venus and Mercury Meteorites as planetary fragments. Debate about extraterrestrial origins of carbon-based life-forms.

    The course will be taught online using MyAberdeen and supplemented with face to face sessions as necessary.

    1st Attempt: 100% Continuous assessment - Continuous Assessment (50%) End of course Assessment (50%).

    Resit: 1 paper equivalent to end of course assessment (100%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Formative assessment will be provided throughout the course using quizzes, chat rooms and discussion boards/blogs.

    Feedback will be provided via the VLE/Turnitin as appropriate.

    KL 2574
    HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr Sally Middleton

    Pre-requisite(s): None

    Co-requisite(s): None

    Note(s): (i) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

    The need to consider usability, task analysis, contextual design, query techniques and focus groups, information architecture, types of interfaces, prototyping, analytical usability evaluation, evaluation of safety-critical systems, user testing, universal access, cross-cultural design and internationalisation, psychology of HCI, technical writing. Extra advanced topics may vary from year to year.

    Four hours per week: 2 one hour lectures delivered via recordings mounted on webCT, 1 two hour practical delivered remotely using webCT.

    1st Attempt: 1 two hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%). In order to pass this course, candidates must obtain a pass mark in the examination and in the overal combination of examination and continuous assessment.

    Resit: 1 two hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forwards (25%). In order to pass this course, candidates must obtain a pass mark in the examination and in the overal combination of examination and continuous assessment.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Regular chatrooms will provide students with practice opportunies and formative assessment. The assessed coursework involves most of the students working in groups and learning as a result of the interactions that take place.

    Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

    KL 2576
    ALGORITHMIC PROBLEM SOLVING
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

    Pre-requisite(s): KL 109D or KL 159C

    Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Coordinator. This course cannot be taken in a graduating curriculum with CS 2012.

    This course identifies fundamental data structures and algorithms as the basic building blocks of software systems, and provides experience of their implementation and application using a programming language. Introduction to Design of algorithms. Recursion and simple analysis of recursive methods. Data Types & Abstraction. Use of Programming Language Data Structures. Stacks, Queues, Deques and Lists. Hash tables. Trees. Search Trees. Heaps. Sets. Algorithmic paradigms and their applications. Implementation issues and efficiency measures.

    This course will be delivered independently through MyAberdeen, however the two one-hour lecture recordings per week will be uploaded. There will also be a 2 hour online practical each week.

    1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%) and in course assessments (50%). In order to pass the course, candidates must obtain a pass mark in the examination and in the overall combinations of examination and in-course assessment (with the above weights).

    Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); carried forward original in-course assessments (25%). Candidates must obtain a pass mark in the exam and the overall combination of exam and in-course assessment.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

    Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

    KL 258A
    ANALYTICAL METHODS IN FORENSIC CHEMISTRY
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

    Pre-requisite(s): KL 107R and KL 157M or the on-campus equivalents

    Note(s):

    The course covers the underlying theory of the identification and determination of, for example, poisons such as pesticides or heavy metals in biological fluids, and of alcohol and drugs of abuse in mixtures of organic compounds including their structure determination by spectroscopic methods. This will involve study of the chemical reactions useful in analytical chemistry such as acid-base, complex formation, precipitation, redox and seperation by transfer between phases, and also an introduction to both theory and practical experience of modern instrumental methods of analysis, with particular reference to forensic chemistry, and also to the closely related topic of enviornmental monitoring.

    Two one-hour recorded lectures per week, one one-hour tutorial per fortnight delivered through MyAberdeen. Intensive Aberdeen based practical weekend.

    1st Attempt: 1 x two-hour written examination (60%), continuous assessment (40%).

    Resit: 1 x two-hour written examination (100%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Formative assessment given during tutorial classes and laboratory classes.

    Marks for lab experiments and tutorial exercises available as soon as possible after the assessments; feedback on wrong answers provided. Informal discussion with students in lab sessions.

    KL 258C
    COSMOLOGY, ASTRONOMY AND MODERN PHYSICS
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

    Pre-requisite(s):

    Co-requisite(s): None

    Note(s): Cannot be taken with PX 2510.

    The course will be delivered independently through MyAberdeen, but students will be given the option of attending the 2 one-hour lectures and 1 one hour tutorial per week.

    In this course we aim to summarise some of the key developments in Modern (post 1900) physics in a simple and accessible manner. As such, the course is divided into "Modern Physics", comprising special relativity, quantum mechanics, nuclear physics and particle physics, and also "Cosmology and Astronomy". Where appropriate some of this will be presented in a historical context, describing how models are developed and tested, and how new theories come to light.

    In the first part of the course, we discuss general "Modern Physics". The twin subjects of relativity and quantum mechanics have had an impact right across the sciences. The course discusses why these topics emerged from classical physics, outlines what they are about and some of their fundamental results. From special relativity we will examine time dilation, mass increase, length contraction and of course E=mc2 and the implications of this equation. The development of quantum mechanics will be followed, leading to such key results as the (implications of the) Schrodinger Wave equation and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. We will then go on to learn about the basics of nuclear and particle physics, leading to the design and purpose of the LHC.

    The course also addresses some philosophical issues raised by the question "What is science?" and what distinguishes it from other fields of knowledge. It discusses the Big Bang theory of the origin of the Universe and how this theory makes predictions that can be tested by observation, such as the cosmic microwave background and the relative abundance of light elements in the Universe. The course looks at several cosmological issues, such as the role of General Relativity, Olbers paradox, dark matter and dark energy. Large-scale astronomy is discussed including the evolution of galaxies, different kinds of stars and their evolution and the presence of "exotic" objects such as quasars and black holes.

    Two one-hour recorded lectures and 1 one-hour tutorial per week, delivered via MyAberdeen.

    1st Attempt: One two-hour multiple choice examination (60%); in-course assessment (40%) comprising two group presentations and a short summary essay.

    Resit:One two-hour multiple choice examination (60%). The in-course assessment will be carried forward, although there is the opportunity to resubmit the short summary essay (worth 10%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Problem solving will be tackled during tutorials and help and feedback will be given individually.

    Tutorial feedback will be given orally, though written feedback can also be given if tutorial work is handed in for marking. For summative (group) assessments, written feedback (by e-mail) will be given to each group on their work within a week of the assessment. For the summary essay, individual written feedback will be given.

    KL 258D
    ADVANCED WEB APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

    Pre-requisite(s): KL 108Z or KL 157Z or on campus equivalents.

    Note(s): i) Assistive technology statement as on all other Computing Science courses. ii) This course cannot be taken in a graduating curriculum with CS 2512.

    Syllabus:

    • Advanced programming using a scripting language, including top-down design, reading and writing to files, inheritance and other relationships between classes, event handling, error handling, testing, data structures and algorithmic structures.


    • Advanced programming for the internet, including searching, security, and plug-ins.

    2 one hour recorded lectures uploaded onto MyAberdeen, 1 two hour online practical, per week.

    1st Attempt: 100% from in course assessments. In order to pass the course, candidates must obtain a pass mark (CAS > 8).

    Resit: Candidates will be able to resubmit the in course assessment, which will be capped at CAS 9.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

    Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

    KL 258E
    ORGANIC AND BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

    Pre-requisite(s): CM1015 or CM1016, CM1510 or KL equivalents. For students of Chemical Engineering the sole prerequisite is CM1510.

    Shape, conformation, and stereochemistry in organic and biologically relevant compounds. Reactions and reactivity of both aliphant and armatic compounds will be considered with particular reference to spatial and electronic effects.

    Two one-hour recorded lectures per week, one one-hour tutorial per fortnight delivered through MyAberdeen. Intensive Aberdeen based practical weekend.

    1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (66.7%) and in-course assessment in the form of laboratory reports (33.3%).

    Resit: 1 three-hour writeen examination (66.7%) and in-course assessment in the form of laboratory reports (33.3%).
    Only the marks obtained on first sitting can be used for Honours classification.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Exercises will be performed during online chat sessions and feedback will be given.

    Informal feedback will be given to students after the practical reports.

    KL 258G
    MINERAL CHEMISTRY
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Middleton

    Pre-requisite(s): KL 107Z or KL 197Z or KL 157X or KL 199A or KL 107R or KL 108W or on campus equivalent

    Be able to recognize and understand the genesis of minerals of economic importance.
    The seven crystal systems and their geometry
    Bravais lattices.
    Bonding and coordination of ions
    Silicates and the silicon tetrahedron
    Carbonates
    Sulphides

    Recorded lectures uploaded onto MyAberdeen, supplemented with face to face sessions as necessary.

    1st Attempt: 100% Continuous assessment. Continuous Assessment (50%) End of course Assessment (50%).

    Resit: 1 paper equivalent to end of course assessment (100%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Formative assessment will be provided throughout the course using quizzes, chat rooms and discussion boards/blogs.

    Feedback will be provided via the VLE/Turnitin as appropriate.

    KL 259A
    MODERN PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr Sally Middleton

    Pre-requisite(s): KL109D Computer Programming and Principles or on campus equivalent.

    Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

    Major programming paradigms including procedural, functional and logic.

    Syntax and semantics of programming languages.
    Imperative programming languages (including object-oriented).

    Functional programming languages.

    Logic programming languages.

    Parallel programming languages.

    Domain-specific and special-purpose programming languages.

    2 one-hour recorded lectures and a 1 two-hour practical via MyAberdeen per week.

    1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

    Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forwards (25%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunies and formative assessment.

    Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

     

    > Level 3
    KL 3030/KL 3530/KL 4034/KL 4534
    SCOTTISH ARCHAEOLOGY: MATERIAL CULTURE
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Mr Donald Paterson

    Pre-requisite(s): 90 Credits at Level 2 from courses from the Scottish Archaeology/Scottish Studies Programmes.

    Co-requisite(s): None.

    The course will concentrate on 6 themes:

    • Developments of archaeological ideas and the definition of "material culture".

    • The reality and importance of materiao culture and how we can relate it to the past.

    • Museums, objects and popular interpretation of archaeology.

    • Sites as materiao culture.

    • Landscape as an artefact.

    • Special landscapes, the idea of "specialness".

    6 One and a half hour video conference lecture/tutorial sessions.Exercises in the course workbook, directed reading.

    Those taking the course at level 4 will have three extra seminar sessions where students will each present a topic allocated during the course.

    1st Attempt: Continuous assessment: One essay based on an artefact agreed with the course tutor (2500 words) (30%). One assignment in the form of an illustrated interpretation leaflet for an archaeological site. (30%)
    One two-hour exam. (40%)

    For those taking the course at level 4, the exam paper will be more advanced than Level 3 requiring a more critical engagement with the course material.

    Resit: Resit examination
    The essay marks will be carried forward.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Tutorials involve group discussion of questions posed in the course workbook and on the course MyAberdeen site. These discussions enable students to test their knowledge and understanding of the subject.

    As the course is delivered flexibly, and many students are not present in person, most formative feedback is done by e mail exchanges with the course tutor or programme co-ordinator.
    Feedback on summative assessments is provided on assessment section of MyAberdeen, where all written work is submitted. Tutors are requested to give feedback for Focus on topic, Content, Argument, Structure, Use of learning resources, Referencing & quotations, Language skills, presentation and use of visuals as well as indicating how students might have improved. The schedule for feedback is such that students have summative feedback before they need to submit their next piece of work.

    KL 3052
    ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELDWORK PORTFOLIO 3
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr Donald Paterson

    Pre-requisite(s): KL 205K for those studying towards a qualification in Scottish Archaeology. For those studying towards the Degree in Archaeology by flexible study, permission of the Head of Archaeology is required.

    Co-requisite(s): None.

    • At least 80 hours active participation as part of a team in an approved excavation.

    • Collection of data, photographs, sketches, maps and diagrams as appropriate.

    • Communication of the results of this participation in a 2000 - 3000 word Portfolio (exclusive of appendices).

    80 Hours participation in an approved excavation.
    4 One and a half hour video conference lecture/tutorial sessions.

    1st Attempt: Presentation of a portfolio in the manner used in Archaeological Fieldwork Portfolio 2 (KL205K) and following discussion with the tutor and fellow class members during the tutorial sessions.

    Resubmission with changes following feedback from the Tutor and Exam Board.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Feedback by the excavation director/field assistants during the excavation, and feedback from the tutor (and classmates) during the tutorial sessions.

    During the excavation, students are given advice, assistance and feedback from the excavation team.

    Thereafter, in assembling the Portfolio, as the course is delivered flexibly, and many students are not present in person, most feedback is done in the tutorial sessions or by e mail exchanges with the course tutor.

    KL 305C/KL 355C/KL 405C/KL 455C
    SCOTTISH ARCHAEOLOGY: ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr Donald Paterson

    Pre-requisite(s): 120 credits at level 2 of which 60 must come from Archaeology and/or Scottish Archaeology courses.

    Co-requisite(s): None.

    Note(s): Students completing the course at level 3 can not at a later date take the same course at a different level as part of a graduating curriculum. By agreement with Advisors of Study, KL 305B/KL 355B (Designing and Managing) together with KL 305C/KL 355C (Archaeological Resource Management) may be taken in place of AY 3007 (Advanced Archaeological Practice).

    The course will consider why archaeological features might be conserved and interpreted. The values for society of sites within the wider heritage, beyond the evidence they may provide for past activities will be explored. An outline of legal and organisational frameworks will also be provided. Students will be expected to one self guided field visit to a museum or heritage centre in order to assess the relationship between interpretation and site.

    6 Ninety minute seminar workshops fortnightly, plus directed learning.

    For those taking the course at level 4, directed learning including three extra separate discussion tutorials relating to the review of individual projects where students will each make a presentation.

    1st Attempt: 2 Assignments - one (1500/2000 words) based on a visit to an archaeological site/monument, the other (1200/1500 words) based on a museum visit (60%); 1 two hour written exam (40%).

    The exam paper at level 4 will be more advanced than Level 3, requiring a more critical engagement with the course material.

    Resit: Resit examination. The essay marks will be carried forward.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Tutorials involve an element of group discussion of questions posed in the course workbook. These discussions enable students to test their knowledge and understanding of the subject.

    As the course is delivered flexibly, and many students are not present in person, most formative feedback is done by e mail exchanges with the course tutor or programme co-ordinator.
    Feedback on summative assessments is provided on assessment section of MyAberdeen, where all written work is submitted. Tutors are requested to give feedback for Focus on topic, Content, Argument, Structure, Use of learning resources, Referencing & quotations, Language skills, presentation and use of visuals as well as indicating how students might have improved. The schedule for feedback is such that students have summative feedback before they need to submit their next piece of work.

     

    > Level 4

    PLEASE NOTE: Resit: (for Honours students only): Candidates achieving a CAS mark of 6-8 may be awarded compensatory level 1 credit. Candidates achieving a CAS mark of less than 6 will be required to submit themselves for re-assessment and should contact the Course Co-ordinator for further details.

    KL 4051
    ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELDWORK PORTFOLIIO 4
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr Donald Paterson

    Pre-requisite(s): KL 3052 (Archaeological Fieldwork Portfolio 2) and KL 3050/KL 3550 (Archaeological Theory) for those studying towards a qualification in Scottish Archaeology.

    Co-requisite(s): None.

    • At least 80 hours active participation as part of a team in an approved excavation.

    • Collection of data, photographs, sketches, maps and diagrams as appropriate.

    • Communication of the results of this participation in a 2000 - 3000 word Portfolio (exclusive of appendices).
    • 80 Hours participation in an approved excavation.
      4 One and a half hour video conference lecture/tutorial sessions.

      Presentation of a portfolio in the manner used in Archaeological Fieldwork Portfolio 3 (KL 3052) and following discussion with the tutor and fellow class members during the tutorial sessions.

      Resubmission with changes following feedback from the Tutor and Exam Board.

      Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

      Feedback by the excavation director/field assistants during the excavation, and feedback from the tutor (and classmates) during the tutorial sessions.

      During the excavation, students are given advice, assistance and feedback from the excavation team.

      Thereafter, in assembling the Portfolio, as the course is delivered flexibly, and many students are not present in person, most feedback is done in the tutorial sessions or by e mail exchanges with the course tutor.

      KL 4593
      ARCHAEOLOGY FIELDWORK SUMMER SCHOOL
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr Donald Paterson

      Pre-requisite(s): 120 credits at level 2 of which 60 must come from Archaeology and/or Scottish Archaeology courses.

      Co-requisite(s): None.

      The course will involve working as a member of a team to:

      • Review the literature and consider possible small fieldwork projects in the selected area (which can be carried out in the time available).

      • Meet as a member of the team and with the course organiser to evaluate potential projects and agree on a final project.

      • Allocate and carry out tasks as appropriate prior to the field work.

      • Obtain permissions for access to the site/s and obtain permission to work on these sites.

      • During the week, you will carry out individual or small group work as part of the overall project.

      • At the end of the course, students will be required to prepare and present a report (c5000 - 6000 words plus figures, maps, diagrams as appropriate).

      Three Ninety minute discussion seminars prior to the summer school.
      Daily briefings during the summer school.
      Final debriefing/discussuion session after the summer school prior to writing and submission of reports.

      1st Attempt: Presentation of a report (c5000 - 6000 words plus figures, maps, diagrams as appropriate).

      Resit: Resubmission of the report following feedback from the exam board.

      Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

      Formative feedbcak will be given at all stages from the pre summer school planning to the final debriefing.

      Formative feedback will be given orally during the briefing sessions. Summative feedback will be given in the form of a written report following the exam board.