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CENTRE FOR LIFELONG LEARNING – FLEXIBLE ARCHAEOLOGY

> Level 1
KL 105H
THE HUMAN PAST: AN INTRODUCTION TO WORLD PREHISTORY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): This course includes a one-day field trip, which will involve some off-road walking over gentle terrain. The School is committed to making reasonable adjustments for students with mobility issues, and any student with concerns should contact the course coordinator at the beginning of the course.? Students will be asked to make a nominal contribution towards the cost of the field trip.

This course introduces the discipline of archaeology, human origins, and world prehistory. It is structured around three themes:

Being and becoming human. Hominid evolution, early subsistence strategies, tools and social life, the origins of cognition and the human mind, early evidence for ‘art’ and ‘religion’.

Transformations in human society. The global development of human complexity, including the transition to agriculture, the emergence of social complexity, urban life, the fist polities.

Perceptions of the past. Interpretation and dissemination of archaeological knowledge in museums, sites, and visual media, and how these reflect and influence how the past has been perceived.

4 fortnightly classes of one-and-a-half-hours – times may vary.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%) and in-course assessment (50%)

Resit: 1 two-hour written exam (50%) PLUS original in-course assessment carried forward (50%)

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

KL 155H
ARCHAEOLOGY IN ACTION
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s):

Covering the first essentials of archaeological enquiry, the course is structured around two central themes:

The study of the past. A general overview of the history of archaeological enquiry.
Material culture and archaeological methods. An introduction to the principles of artefact study, chronology, typology and other methods and techniques used by archaeologists in their research.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%) and in-course assessment (50%)

Resit: Resit exam: 1 two-hour written exam (50%) PLUS original in-course assessment carried forward (50%)

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

 

> Level 2
KL 205T
INTERPRETING THE PAST
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): Either KL 105H or KL 155H

As an advanced introduction to theoretical and ethical aspects of archaeological enquiry, the course includes two themes:
Archaeological theory since 1950. World history of archaeological theory, starting with culture-historical approaches, adaptive and ecological perspectives, and moving on to recent post-processual and gender critiques. Concludes with an exploration of how archaeological theory might develop in the future.

Archaeological ethics. Explores the political and moral implications of how archaeologists study and represent past societies. Considers issues of cultural heritage, artefact ownership and land-rights, and examines the politics of excavation, interpretation and repatriation.

2 one-hour lectures a week with two reading weeks (18 lectures in total) made available on-line and 3 two-hour tutorials.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment in the form of a 2500-word essay (50%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (50%) plus original in-course assessment carried forward (50%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Detailed essay feed back forms; in-class tutorial feedback.

KL 205U
ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE NORTH: COLONISATION AND CULTURE CONTACT
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): Either KL 105H or KL 155H

Co-requisite(s): None

Lectures examine the first colonisations of the North and trace how these earlier populations established the cultural, ethnic and religious diversity that defined later periods. Attention is also directed towards understanding the changing nature of contacts between indigenous peoples and European settlers. In particular, the course draws on a series of case-studies to examine:
The earliest human colonisations of northern Eurasia and North America

Later migrations and more recent inter-cultural contacts across the northern world

The arrival of Vikings and other European settlers into the North

The changing interactions between colonists and indigenous peoples

2 one-hour lectures a week with 2 reading weeks (16 lectures in total) which are made available on-line and 3 two-hour tutorials.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment in form of an analytical poster (50%).
Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (50%) plus original in-course assessment carried forward (50%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Detailed poster feedback forms; in-class tutorial feedback.

KL 255T
ARCHAEOLOGIES OF SOCIAL LIFE
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): Either KL 105H or KL 155H

As an advanced introduction to archaeological enquiry, the course focuses on the archaeology of social life and examines several inter-locking themes:
Innovation, production and consumption

Social identity and material culture

Ritual and religion

Personhood, death and the body

Economic and environmental archaeology

Settlement archaeology and landscape research

2 one-hour lectures a week with 2 reading weeks (18 lectures in total) made available on-line and 3 two-hour tutorials.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment in the form of an analytical poster (50%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (50%) plus original in-course assessment carried forward (50%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Detailed poster feedback forms; in-class tutorial feedback.

KL 255U
ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE NORTH: LIFEWAYS AND WORLD-VIEWS
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): Either Kl 105H or KL 155H

This course provides students with a detailed introduction to the ecological, economic and spiritual dimensions to the Archaeology of the North (defined here as Scotland, Northern Europe, Siberia, the North Pacific, North America and the North Atlantic). We will examine the diverse ways in which communities have made the northern world their home. The course draws on a series of case-studies to examine three interlocking themes:
Human ecology of northern landscapes. Examines the opportunities and constraints that characterise high-latitude environments.

Living in the North. Investigates some of the creative ways in which northern people have adapted to and transformed these ecological settings, including how societies have responded to frequent periods of severe climate change, and the role of technology in mobility and adaptation.

The Northern Mind. Critically explores the abundant archaeological evidence for ritual, worship and spirituality, focusing on rock art, burial practices, sacred places and other forms of evidence. Ethnographic parallels are widely employed in the interpretation of these datasets.

2 one-hour lectures a week with 2 reading weeks (16 lectures in total) made available on-line and 4 two-hour tutorials.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment in the form of a 2500-word essay (50%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (50%) plus original in-course assessment carried forward (50%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Detailed essay feedback forms; in-class tutorial feedback.

 

> Level 3
KL 305L
ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): 45 credits at Level 2 or above.

This course provides an overview of the key scientific methods that allow field archaeologists to maximize the quantity and quality of the material they can recover from sites, and which enhance the understanding and interpretation of archaeological sites and materials. Using a combination of lectures and practical workshops, the course will cover scientific methods of dating, artefact provenancing and ancient technologies, methods used for the study of diet, health, and movements of humans and animals in the past, and the identification of ancient pollution and other environmental impacts of human activities.

1 two-hour lecture (Lectures will be made available on-line) each week.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); coursework in the form of a critical review of a group of research papers (30%) and practical reports (20%).

Resit: Marks from continuous assessment to be carried forward (50%); 1 two-hour examination (50%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Detailed critical review feedback forms.

KL 3541
VIKING ARCHAEOLOGY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr K Milek

Pre-requisite(s): None although at least one Archaeology course at level 1 or 2 is recommended.

Note(s): This course may NOT be included in a graduating curriculum with AY 4509. Students will be asked to make a contribution towards the cost of a field trip to the National Museum of Scotland, in Edinburgh.

This course provides students with a detailed overview of the Viking Age peoples of Scandinavia, and their dramatic expansion in the eighth to eleventh centuries AD. We will review the archaeological evidence for population and settlement patterns, ethnicity and social structure, the development of urban centres and commerce, and Viking Age religion, and will chart the political process that led to the rise of the modern nation stages of Norway, Sweden and Denmark. This Scandinavian background will then be set in the wider context of the Viking diaspora, examining Norse contact, conflict, trade and colonisation from Canada in the West to the Asian steppe in the East.

2 one-hour lectures per week (excluding reading weeks) and 4 one-hour tutorials.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); coursework (50%) in the form of a 3,000-word essay (30%) and a 1,500- to 2,000-word artefact project (20%).

Resit: Marks from continuous assessment to be carried forward (50%); 1 two-hour examination (50%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Detailed essay feedback forms; oral feedback provided in tutorials.




 

> Level 4

PLEASE NOTE: Resit: (for Honours students only): Candidates achieving a CAS mark of 6-8 may be awarded compensatory level 1 credit. Candidates achieving a CAS mark of less than 6 will be required to submit themselves for re-assessment and should contact the Course Co-ordinator for further details.

KL 4056
GEOARCHAEOLOGY: APPORACHES TO PAST HUMAN-ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson

Pre-requisite(s): None although KL 305L Archaeological Science is recommended.

Note(s): This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the complex relationships between past human societies and the environments with which they were intimately associated, and covers important issues for the archaeology of all regions and time periods, including: Different theoretical and methodological approaches to the understanding of past human-environment relations.

Processes of archaeological site formation: the relationships between human activities, natural processes, and the physical characteristics of soils and sediments on archaeological sites.

Techniques used to reconstruct past human environments, and the importance of situating past cultural practices in their environmental context
Archaeological case studies from around the world that link past human activities to large-scale landscape changes.

2 one-hour lectures (made available on-line) or 1 two-hour practical per week, excluding reading weeks (20 hours total) and a one-day field trip to examine and sample soils and sediments at a local archaeological site, plus 4 further hours of dedicated Level 4 seminars.

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (50%), in the form of a field notebook (10%), a lab notebook (10%), and either a practical project or an essay (30%), depending on the students’ interests and background (3,000 words).

Resit: Marks from continuous assessment to be carried forward (50%); re-sit exam (50%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment of essay/project proposals and outlines; detailed essay feedback forms, oral feedback during labs, seminars and field trips.

KL 4528
CURRENT ISSUES IN ARCHAEOLOGY
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Paterson / MS C Wickham-Jones

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to student at level 4 of an Archaeology degree programme.

Note(s): This course is not available in academic in 2012/13.

The course integrates various components of Archaeological study to date, and students are expected to draw together, and build on, their knowledge from previous courses to tackle challenging and perhaps unfamiliar topics through analysis, discussion and open debate. Students will consolidate their skills as confident and autonomous learners and communicators through oral presentations and written work.

12 x 2-hour seminars, one per week (with 6-8 hours of set reading per seminar).

Attendance to the seminars is mandatory and students are expected to actively contribute to the discussion. In addition, students will take it in turns to give a 20-minute introductory presentation at the start of each seminar, to develop discussion questions and to lead the seminar. These presentations will be assessed. Students are also required to attend the Northern Archaeological Research Seminar Series.

In addition, students will be required to:

  • Write a critical research essay on a 'current issue' of their choice.

  • Write a critical review of one of the seminars presented in the department's Northern Archaeological Research Seminar Series.

  • Undertake a day trip to a major museum (e.g. Edinburgh's National Museum), followed by a critical written review of a museum exhibition or display.

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (based on a portfolio of coursework as described above) (100%).

Resit: No resit is possible.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Detailed essay feedback and presentation feedback forms: in class seminar feedback.

KL 4541
VIKING ARCHAEOLOGY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr K Milek

Pre-requisite(s): None, although at least one Archaeology course at level 1 or 2 is recommended.

Note(s): This course may NOT be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with AY 3509. Students will be asked to make a contribution towards the cost of a field trip to the National Museum of Scotland, in Edinburgh.

This course provides students with a detailed overview of the Viking Age peoples of Scandinavia, and their dramatic expansion in the eighth to eleventh centuries AD. We will review the archaeological evidence for population and settlement patterns, ethnicity and social structure, the development of urban centres and commerce, and Viking Age religion, and will chart the political process that led to the rise of the modern nation states of Norway, Sweden and Denmark. This Scandinavian background will then be set in the wider context of the Viking diaspora, examining Norse contact, conflict, trade and colonisation from Canada in the West to the Asian steppe in the East.

2 one-hour lectures per week, excluding reading weeks, and 4 one-hour tutorials; plus 4 further hours of seminars/directed learning.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); coursework (50%) in the form of a 3,000-word essay (30%) and a 1,500- to 2,000-word artefact project (20%).

Resit: Marks from continuous assessment to be carried forward (50%); 1 two-hour examination (50%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Detailed essay feedback forms. Oral feedback during tutorials and seminars.

Oral feedback during tutorials and seminars.