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INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

(see also Politics, GD4003, GD4505, PI3550, PI4056, PI4553 & PI4554)

> Level 3
IR 3009 / IR 3509
INTERNATIONAL PEACE
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Oelsner

Pre-requisite(s): Available to students in Programme Year 3 and above who have achieved 75 credit points from level 1 and 2 Politics & International Relations courses.

Note(s): This course will be available in the second half-session of 2012/13 as IR 3509.

This course explores the issue of conflict resolution and achievement of international peace in today's global world. The course analyses the implications and consequences of the three major types of contemporary international conflict-namely interstate, civil, and state-formation conflicts-for durable peace agreements. The course also discuss the role of international institutions and regional contexts in the peaceful resolution of disputes.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour examination (60%) and in-course assessment (40%) (one 3,000 word essay [30%], one peer and self assessment exercise [10%]).

Resit: Examination (60%); in-course grades will be carried forward.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

IR 3015 / IR 3515
THE POLITICS OF EUROPEAN INTEGRATION
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Glencross

Pre-requisite(s): Available to students in programme year 3 and above who have achieved 75 credit points from Level 1 and 2 Politics & International Relations courses.

Note(s): This course will be available in the second half-session of 2012/13 as IR 3515.

Since World War 2, Europe has undergone a transformation from a continent of nation-states into an integrated political system of shared laws, institutions and even values. This course examines European integration as an essentially contested political process, which continues to divide and inspire nations, political parties and citizens alike. It offers a comprehensive survey of four notable aspects of EU integration: its institutions and policy-making; the models and justifications behind integration; controversies about what the EU does and should do; the democratic nature of the EU system. In addition, the course concludes by discussing the possible future of the EU after the 2009 Lisbon Treaty, with reference not only to similarities with US federal development but also to the EU?s external ambitions and foreign relations.

2 one-hour lectures. 1 one-hour tutorial per week.

1st Attempt: Examination (60%), 2,000-word essay (30%), tutorial presentation and performance (10%).

Resit: Examination (100%); unless candidate opts to carry forward in-course assessment mark.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Presentation exercise in the tutorial.

Structured written feedback on the tutorial presentation; written feedback on in-term essay; summative feedback in form of comments on final exam script.

IR 3016 / IR 3516
INTERNATIONAL SECURITY
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Oelsner

Pre-requisite(s): Available to students in Programme Year 3 and above who have achieved 75 credit points from Level 1 and 2 Politics & International Relations courses.

Note(s): This course will be available in the first half-session of 2012/13 as IR 3016.

The course looks at the idea of international security from a wide range of perspectives. It considers the debates over the continuing dominance of military and state-based approaches to security, examining the arguments for the widening of the security agenda. In addition to this conceptual approach, the course looks at specific case-studies of security issues in the modern world in order to illustrate the implications of widening the security agenda.

2 one-hour lectures and 1 one-hour tutorial per week.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour examination (60%) and in-course assessment (40%).

Resit: Examination (60%); in-course grades will be carried forward.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

IR 3017 / IR 3517
INTELLIGENCE AND NATIONAL SECURITY
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: TBA

Pre-requisite(s): Available to students in programme year 3 and above who have achieved 75 credit points from level 1 and 2 Politics & International Relations courses.

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): Please dual-code this course.

This course introduces the concept and practice of secret intelligence from the perspective of national security addressing what secret intelligence is, what it involves and how this relates to government policies. Topics addressed include conceptual and definitional matters involving intelligence, reviewing historical aspects of intelligence, outlining different intelligence agencies from around the world and looking at different contexts for intelligence including wartime intelligence and counter-intelligence. The course begins by introducing conceptual and historic to provide a framework for looking at the development of intelligence in the 20th and 21st centuries. The themes of national security, the uses of intelligence, types of intelligence and technologies involved in intelligence collection are then developed. The course will also review various case studies of secret intelligence.

2 one hour lectures and 1 one hour tutorial per week

60% three-hour exam, 25 % essay (5,000 word essay), 15% tutorial presentation (including 2,000 word paper)

100% examination

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

None

Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

 

> Level 4

PLEASE NOTE: Resit: (for Honours students only): Candidates achieving a CAS mark of 6-8 may be awarded compensatory level 1 credit. Candidates achieving a CAS mark of less than 6 will be required to submit themselves for re-assessment and should contact the Course Co-ordinator for further details.

IR 4012
DISSERTATION
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Widfeldt

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4.

Students prepare and present, under the supervision of a member of staff, a dissertation on a topic approved by Politics and International Relations.

1st Attempt: Dissertation, 10,000-12,000 words in length (100%).

IR 4014
MODERN DAY LATIN AMERICA
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Bain

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4.

This course examines aspects of contemporary Modern Day Latin America. This includes amongst others the role of the United States. The special case of Cuba, globalisation, guerrilla warfare, the drugs trade and the return to democratisation in the region are examined with appropriate case studies being given. Throughout the course the ideas of development and dependency will be given appropriate attention. This gives students an understanding of a wide range of issues that have affected Latin America's recent past and how they still affect the continent today.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 one-hour tutorial.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour examination (60%), one essay (30%), short answer/multiple choice assessment (10%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

IR 4015 / IR 4515
NUCLEAR WEAPONS IN WORLD POLITICS
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Mr J H Wyllie

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to Level 4 students.

Note(s): This course will not be available in 2012/13.

The course will trace and illustrate the salient strategic, technological and political developments and related controversies in the history of nuclear weapons since 1945. In the process the intellectual integrity of the notion of the 'First' and 'Second' nuclear ages will be tested as will the arguments about the impact of proliferation on world security, the viability of deterrence as the bedrock for security in a multi-nuclear system, and the real dangers posed by the advent of the 'new terrorism' and its possible links with WMD. Case studies such as Iranian nuclear policy, and the compatibility of 'jihadism' and deterrence, will be considered in detail.

1 one-hour lecture, and 1 one-hour tutorial.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour examination (60%); one 4,000 word essay (40%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

IR 4016 / IR 4516
ARAB-ISRAELI RELATIONS
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Mr J Wyllie

Pre-requisite(s): Available to level 4 students only.

Note(s): This course will be available in the second semester of 2012/13 as IR 4516.

The course examines and explains the historical development, political characteristics and strategic complexities of the Arab-Israeli conflict, and assesses its significance for and impact upon stability and security throughout the Middle East and the wider international system. The topics considered include the current strategic situation, the origins of the conflict, wars since 1948, the PLO and Hamas, the 'Peace Process', US - Israeli relations, the EU and the dispute, the Egyptian and Jordanian 'Cold Peace', and the strategies of the 'rejectionist' states of Syria and Iran.

To be taught 'conference style', on a lecture and discussion basis, interspersed with 'team presentations', an 'in-class' essay, and occasional DVD material. There will be 1 two-hours and 1 one-hour classes each week for twelve weeks.

1st attempt: 1 three-hour examination (60%); one 'in-class 1,500 word approx. essay (20%); one 'team presentation' (20%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

IR 4020 / IR 4520
WAR AND PEACE IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS
CREDIT POINTS

Course Co-ordinator: Dr J McEvoy

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): This course will be available in the second semester of 2012/13 as IR 4520.

The course aims to provide students with an understanding of how conflict between ethno-national groups impacts on international politics. It explores the responses of the international community to inter- and intra-state conflict. Following an initial exploration of the relevant theories, the course investigates focuses on a number of key conflicts in international politics. What explains violent conflict between ethnic groups? What role do external actors play in peace processes? Should the international community intervene to stop violent conflict? What kind of institutional frameworks do external actors promote in peace agreements? What are the challenges of post-conflict reconstruction?

To be taught 'conference style', on a lecture and discussion basis, interspersed with 'team presentations', an 'in-class' essay, and occasional DVD material. There will be 1 two-hour and 1 one-hour classes each week for twelve weeks.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour examination (60%); one 'in-class' essay (20%); one 'team presentation' (20%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

IR 4021 / IR 4521
JAPAN AND THE WORLD
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr R Vij

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): This is a level 4 International Relations course. This course will be available in the second semester of 2012/13 as IR 4521.

This course introduces students to alternative ways of understanding Japan's central role in stabilizing global order at the beginning of the 21st century. Starting with a consideration of critical approaches to the production and representation of 'Japan' as an object of study within international relations, the course focuses on a theoretical and historical investigation of three sets of inter-related themes, modernity and capitalism, nationalism and the state, and culture and identity, by way of examining the deeper sources of Japan's changing role in global social life. The course material is inter-disciplinary; including readings from political science, economic history, anthropology, sociology, cultural, and film studies, and covers aspects of Japan's relations with North-America, Asia, the Middle-East, and Europe.

1 two-hour lecture and 1 one-hour tutorial every week.

1st Attempt: Research Paper 4,000 words (60%); Two book reviews, 1,000 words each (25%) of assessment; in-class presentation (15%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.

IR 4023 / IR 4523
AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY IN THEORY AND PRACTICE
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Glencross

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): This course will be available in the second semester of 2012/13 as IR 4523.

This course is divided into four parts: the historical and constitutional origins of US foreign policy, the transition to great power status, twentieth century debates over international entanglement, post-Cold War unipolarity. The first learning section provides an overview of the founders’ intentions about US foreign policy and the political institutions established to nurture this policy. The second part examines the institutional and cultural reasons for the ambivalence of the US as an international actor from the Monroe Doctrine to entry into World War One. The third part focuses on domestic and international factors that resulted in a bipolar distribution of power after 1945 and a web of US-dominated security alliances. The final section explores the unresolved tension between liberal internationalism, neo-conservatism and neo-isolationism since the “unipolar moment” created after the end of the Cold War.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 one-hour tutorial per week.

1st attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (60%), in-course assessment (40%): 3,000 word essay (30%), and seminar presentation (10%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

IR 4027 / IR 4527
MIDDLE EAST POLITICS
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Teti

Pre-requisite(s): Available to students in programme year 4 in Politics and International Relations or with the permission of the Head of School on the recommendation of the course co-ordinator

The course examines the politics of the modern and contemporary Middle East by looking at relevant theories, history and case studies. It provides students with an in-depth understanding of the political, economic and cultural facets of the region's politics by looking at its political systems, its regional and international relations, conflict, political economy, and the 'politics of identity' such as nationalism and Islamism. Assuming no prior expertise in regional politics or history, the course will cover a selection of the following elements:
(i) approaches to Middle East politics: key concepts, theories and issues;
(ii) the regional states system and global dimensions;
(iii) foreign-policy making in the Middle East: a comparative framework;
(iv) state-society relations: Kin, Class, Gender, Monarchy, Military Control, Ideology and Bureaucracy;
(v) Key regional issues such as Islamism, Nationalism, Oil, Water, Wealth, Power, Migration, Conflict: through case studies (Arab-Israeli Conflict, Iran-Iraq war, Gulf Wars, Algerian Civil War, terrorism).

Teaching will be through a combination of lectures and seminars.

2 one-hour lectures per week provide an introduction to the principal historical issues and analytical approaches related to each course Unit.
1 one-hour seminar per week will allow more detailed and advanced discussions: students will be expected to have built up an advanced understanding of the issues in question through independent research. Seminars will be structured around the discussion of set questions/themes.

1st Attempt: Two 2500 word essays (30% each); presentation (20%) (a visual aides and printed notes of the presentation will be available for external examiner scrutiny); in-course test (20%)

Resit: 1 three-hour examination (100%) (3 essay-style questions in 3 hours)

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Feedback will be provided to students in the following means:

  • essays; formal feedback, with the possibility of additional informal feedback
  • presentations; formal feedback, with the possibility of additional informal feedback
  • test; formal feedback, with the possibility of additional informal feedback
  • weekly consultation times; specific hours are reserved for students in which an 'open door policy' allows them flexible access to
    feedback on any aspect of the course, as well as discussion of pastoral issues as required

IR 4029 / IR 4529
ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES AND CONTROVERSIES
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Brown

Pre-requisite(s): Available to students in programme year 4 in Politics and International Relations or with the permission of the Head of School.

Note(s): This course will run in the second half-session of 2012/13 as IR 4529.

The first part of the lecture series will focus on a general introduction into environmental politics. It will relate relevant theories of politics and IR theory to environmental problems and policy-making/ regime-building before turning to relevant institutions, agents and intergovernmental organisations such as the UN, EU and WTO. Key themes such as equity, justice and security will be highlighted. The second and main part will then focus on specfic issues such as climate change, waste export, biodiversity, water security, whaling and GMOs. Comparisons between these issues will be made throughout as well as reminders of key themes, actors and theories covered in part 1. The final part of the lecture series will summarise the main insights from previous lectures and will present an assessment of future developments. It will relate insights to other Politics & IR contexts and encourage students to pursue some (or all) of the environmental issues and themes further.

The seminars follow the main structure of the lecture topics. They will allow students to investigate and discuss the topics in more detail and explore specific case studies relevant to issues such as - whaling from different angles e.g. NGOs' involvement or the US and EU policies on GMOs compared.

1 one-hour lecture; 1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st attempt: 1 three-hour examination (60%); continuous in-course assessment: 3,500 word essay (30%) plus 'team' project (10%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment includes the above stated formal grades as well as informal feedback on students' progress either as individuals or as teams, either in class, in person or via email.

Essay feedback will be presented via the appropriate feedback matrix. Team projects will also receive feedbacks via an adapted matrix using similar criteria. Both will be sufficiently detailed to help students understand and improve their work. Formal feedback will be provided within the Departmental deadlines. Informal feedback will be recorded e.g. on email system, minutes, coordinator's notes.

IR 4030 / IR 4530
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE EU AND THE US: RIVALS OR PARTNERS?
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Lorenzi

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to Level 4 students

Note(s): This course will run in the second half-session of 2012/13 as IR 4530.

The present trends in the relationship will be examined, with special emphasis on issues such as the Euro and the dollar, trade relations, food and agriculture, the environmental policy, foreign policy and international affairs.
The first part of the module will introduce the idea of Euro-American system and put the relationship between the two countries into an historical perspective. The second part examines the main features of the EU as a polity. The third part focuses on different policy areas. The final section attempts to assess the nature of the relationship and the prospects for the future.

1 one hour lecture and 1 one hour seminar per week

1 three hour written examination (60%); and 1 continuous assessment essay of 3000 words (40%).

100% exam

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

None

Extensive written feedback on summative assessment. Continuous feedback on oral contributions in class.

IR 4507
MODERNITY AND ISLAM
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Professor M K Pasha

Pre-requisite(s): Open only to students in Programme Year 4.

This course explores the structure and logic of modernity as it informs Islamic political movements in contemporary international relations. As both constitutive of modernity and challenging its particularised enunciation in the Islamic Cultural Zones, these movements raise basic questions concerning secularisation, forms of religious commitment, relation between politics and faith, and the nature of sovereignty. Students in this course will explore the main theoretical currents surrounding modernity; the Islamic critique of (Western) modernity; the location, heterogeneity and character of contemporary Iaslamic political discourse and political practice; and the limits of political Islam as an alternative construction of social and political order. Finally, the course will also examine the phenomena of transnational and diasporic Islam and their challenge to liberal understandings of political community, citizenship, rights, tolerance and cosmopolitanism.

2 hour seminar weekly.

1st Attempt: Examination (60%) and in-course assessment (40%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Written feedback will be provided for continuous assessment work. This will normally be provided within three weeks of the submission date. Oral feedback on class presentations will also be provided where appropriate.