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HISTORY

> Level 1
HC 1021
BUILDING-BLOCKS OF EUROPEAN CULTURE
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Professor J Stevenson

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): This course MAY NOT be counted towards a degree in History. This course will be available in 2012/13.

  • Introduction: Greece I: the Gods and the Golden Age

  • Greece II: Myths of Origin: Greeks and Trojans

  • Greece III: Politics in practice and theory: the rise of democracy; Plato’s Republic; Aristotle’s Politics

  • Greece IV: Fathers of mathematics, medicine and biology: Pythagoras, Hippocrates, Aristotle and others

  • Greece V: The invention of history

  • Greece VI: Tragedy and its legacy

  • Rome I: the Republic and its heroes

  • Rome II: Creating an empire: Caesar and Augustus

  • Rome III: Translating a culture: Cicero and Virgil

  • Rome IV: Law

  • Rome V: Christianity in the Roman Empire

  • Rome VI: The Fall of Rome

Two lectures plus one seminar.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (60%), essay (30%) continuous assessment (10%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Mostly in connection with preparing and writing an essay.

One-to-one essay returns.

HC 1524
KEY WORKS FOR EUROPEAN CIVILISATION
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: To be advised

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): This course MAY NOT be counted towards a degree in History. This course will be available in 2012/13.

Epic I: Homer's Iliad

Epic II: Homer's Odyssey

Epic III: Vergil's Aeneid

Epic IV: Dante's Divinia Commedia

History I: Herodotus

History II: Thucydides

History III: Livy

History IV: Eusebius

Philosophy I: Plato

Philosophy II: Aristotle

Philosophy III: Plotinus

Philosophy IV: Greek Philosophy in the Latin West and the Islamic East

2 one-hour lectures, one seminar.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (60%), essay (30%), coursework (10%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

HI 1020
VIKINGS!
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr T Wills

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): This course will be available in 2012/13.

This course analyses the so-called "Viking Age". It invites students to critically consider whether the concept of the "Viking" can be usefully applied in order to to understand the history of Europe and beyond in the period c. 800-1200.

This was a period of warfare and pillage, political turmoil and social transformation, but also economic expansion and cultural innovation. In 795 raiders attacked the Christian monastic community on Iona in the Scottish western isles. Their activities extended from Denmark, Norway and Sweden out to Continental Europe, North America, Russia, and the Mediterranean Basin. Over time they accepted Christian beliefs and gradually integrated into European society. In Iceland they created a republic which has remained Scandinavian in culture; elsewhere, for instance Britain, Ireland, and Russia, they adopted and modified the host culture. By the twelfth century, Christian national kingdoms had been created in Scandinavia. "Viking" cultures became fully integrated into the wider project of European Christianization, including active involvement in the Crusades. The Viking Age had come to an end.

The course will introduce students to a broad range of methods and approaches to primary sources, from archaeological remains and rune-stones to ships and bridges, and from legal texts and chronicles to praise-poetry and sagas. Scandinavian expansionism will be presented in the wider political context of Dark-Age Europe, rooted in the late-antique breakdown of Roman rule and the accompanying ‘barbarian’ incursions. Alongside the political developments students will be introduced to key aspects of so-called "Viking-Age" culture and society, which in turn helped shape the politics of the period. These include religions old and new, the relationship between law and blood-feud, the transition from oral to textual modes of commemoration and learning, the development of new maritime technologies, and the roles of women in society.

3 one-hour lectures and 1 one-hour tutorial (to be arranged) per week.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (60%); continuous assessment (40%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Chairing discussions, individual classroom presentations, individual essay return.

The students are offered the possibility of one-to one essay return with written comments, advice on improvements and if necessary information about learnings support; Class meetings, Mixed tutor and peer assessment by students.

HI 1022
EUROPE IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr T Heywood

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Major events in European history and structures in European societies will be examined thematically. Whilst covering some aspects in chronological order, and providing some basic summary of main themes such as the two World Wars, social policies, economic upheaval, post-WWII reconstruction and others, particular emphasis will be placed on linking those developments to some wider interpretations of Twentieth Century European History as a whole.

3 one-hour lectures and 1 one-hour tutorial per week to be arranged.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%), continuous assessment (50%).

Continuous assessment: 1 ca 2,500 word essay (40%), active and meaningful class participation (10%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Individual and group presentations.

Individual return and discussion of essays, and feedback on presentations; time set aside in at least one tutorial for discussion of assessment, and in one lecture for course related issues; staff-student consultative committee.

HI 1522
AN INTRODUCTION TO SCOTTISH HISTORY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Macdonald

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): This course will be available in 2012/13.

Scotland is one of the oldest political units in Europe, emerging as a discernible entity by the later 10th century. The objective of this course is to chart the underlying continuities and radical changes that mark the nation’s historical development from the 12th century up to the present day. The course will explore underlying processes such as ‘industrialisation’ and ‘Clearance’ as well as clearly defined events such as the Wars of Independence or the Anglo-Scottish Union of 1707. In doing so the class assesses the value of, and the problems inherent in, studying societies through the prism of national history.

3 one-hour lectures and 1 one-hour tutorial per week.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%) and in-course assessment (50%).

In course assessment 

  • assessed essay (3,000 words) at 40% of the final assessment;

  • meaningful tutorial participation (‘meaningful participation’ requires the delivery of a presentation AND the production of one brief source report) at 10% of the final assessment.

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

As part of the minor assessed arrangements for tutorial participation the source review will test students in the key historical skills of reading and analysing texts/other primary sources critically and emphatically, while addressing questions of genre, content, perspective and purpose.

The assessed essay will build upon the skills identified in the source review while also providing an opportunity to progress in those aspects that were less effectively delivered. The emphasis will be on testing academic attributes, inculding in-depth and extensive knowledge and understanding, the development of concise and coherent structured work which delivers a reasoned, effective and comprehensive analysis.

The exam will test specific academic and generic skills, with an emphasis on breadth of knowledge, the capacity to reformulate and express acquired understanding while also demonstrating a capacity for problem identification and the delivery of structured, coherent and fluent written work.

HI 1523
RENAISSANCES AND REFORMATIONS
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: TBC

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): This course will be available in 2012/13.

The course provides a broad overview of the changes which the Renaissance and Reformations introduced to European culture, politics, religion, society and people’s understanding of their role in the world. It traces these developments in a comparative way, from Europe’s Atlantic cost to East Central Europe and Russia, throughout a changing image of the world and its relationship to the spiritual, brought on by Renaissance, a time of unrest triggered by the European Reformations, the radical and the magisterial reformations, European expansion, the growth of monarchies and republics, and the wars of religion of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It concludes with the onset of the early Enlightenment and an analysis of absolutist court culture. A chronological approach is combined with a thematic survey of major historical movements, concepts, ideas and developments, such as monarchy, nobility, secularisation, serfdom and feudalism, urbanisation, sexuality and everyday life, witchcraft and popular belief, court culture, mercantilism, and warfare.

Lectures 3 one-hour lectures weekly for 12 weeks to provide a larger context and introduce to new themes (such as 'serfdom' or 'republicanism'), often across national borders and historiographies and reflect on larger debates.

1 one-hour tutorials are held weekly from the second week of term, for ten weeks. Tutorials are designed to give students an opportunity to study particular topics in greater depth and to raise questions about documents that will improve their knowledge of the subject area. Students are expected to undertake preparation for tutorial discussion every week by reading select articles, thinking about the relevant documentary extracts and scrutinising the context through secondary literature.

1st Attempt: Assessment is based on:

  • written essay at (30%) of the final assessment;

  • Documents test at (10%);

  • tutorial participation at (10%);

  • two-hour degree examination at (50%).

Details: Essay: 2,000 words
Documents Test: comment on 2 documents (from a selection of five) during a one-hour test
Tutorial participation: (10%) to encourage attendance and practice preparation and presentation skills
1 two-hour final examination: answer 2 questions from a choice of 8.

Resit: Final examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

A book-review (formal) or a draft essay (informal) to return feedback on writing examples before students hand in their essays. Also possible forms: chairing of discussion and presentation sessions, etc., role play assuming historical characters and debates.

One-to-one essay return as soon as possible, with plenty of comments, advice in improvement and, if necessary, information about learning support courses at the university; office hours, class meetings, mixed tutor- and peer assessment by students and discussion thereof.

 

> Level 2
HC 2001
THE HISTORY AND CULTURE OF ANCIENT GREECE
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Professor J Stevenson

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): This course is focused on the history and cultural achievements of Ancient Greece as objects of study in their own right, rather than as the background to European culture: it will attract these students who were made curious by the brief introductions offered in Level I, 'Building Blocks of European Culture' and 'Key Works for European Civilisation'. I would expect anyone interested in this course to have taken one or other of the first year SSP options but they are not required to: there is no reason to exclude students who passed up the Level I courses because they had covered at least some of the material in another context (eg. students with Classics-related A levels).

This course will be available in 2012/13.

This course MAY NOT be counted towards a degree in History.

  1. When Greece faced East: orientalism from Mycenae to Marathon

  2. Wine, Song and Society: the symposium and the lyric poets

  3. Tyranny: the rise and demise of a form of government

  4. Philosophy before Socrates

  5. Why Greece turned West: the Persian Wars in Herodotus and Aeschylus

  6. Athenian democracy and empire

  7. Society and Culture in Athens? Golden Age

  8. Sparta and the myth of Lycurgus

  9. The Peloponnesian Wars: Thucydides and Aristophanes

  10. Alexander the Great

  11. Hellenistic Court Culture

  12. Hellenistic Philosophy: Stoics, Epicureans and Academic Sceptics

2 one-hour lectures; one tutorial per week.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (60%); one 3,000 word essay (30%); Tutorial participation (10%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Informal feedback and guidance from tutors. Email or verbal response to students' issues from the Course Coordinator. Essays returned individually with written comment and 1:1 discussion of the work.

Written comment, 1:1 discussion of work.

HC 2002 / HC 2502
GOD AND THE GODS: MYTH, RELIGION AND CULTURE IN THE ANCIENT WORLD
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr C Brittain

Pre-requisite(s): Available to students in year 2 and above.

Note(s): This course can be taken as part of a Sustained Study Programme in the Classical Tradition.

This course MAY NOT be counted towards a degree in History.

This course will not be available in 2012/13.

This course explores the great myths of the ancient world, found in literature from Homer to Virgil and in abundant visual representation, and how they continue to influence European Culture. The course provides the student with a thorough introduction to those stories and their social contexts in light of insights from modern scholarship.

2 one-hour lectures and 1 one-hour seminar every other week.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (60%); continuous assessment (40%): one 3,000 word essay (30%); tutorial participation (10%). Successful completion of the course requires the submission of all coursework and assessment at CAS 6 or above.

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%). Admission to the exam depends on the submission of all coursework and assessment at CAS 6 or above.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Tutorials will supply opportunities for formative assessment, but the nature of these will be left to the discretion of the tutors.

Feedback will be given by tutors on tutorial work. Whether oral or written will be left to the discretion of the tutor.
Summative assessment will receive written feedback.

HC 2501
ROME
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: To be advised

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): This course can be taken as part of a Sustained Study Programme in the Classical Tradition. The course MAY NOT be counted towards a degree in History.

A typical lecture syllabus would be:

  1. Roman Origins

  2. The Etruscans and the Kings of Rome

  3. The Rise of the Republic

  4. The Punic Wars: the challenge of Hannibal

  5. Rome and Greek Civilisation: translation, imitation and wholesale theft

  6. Civil Wars I: dissent within the republic; populism, slave revolts

  7. Civil Wars II: Caesar, Anthony and Pompey

  8. Augustus, the Julio-Claudians, and the creation of a new world order

  9. The Augustan age in literature and art

  10. An expanding empire: Hadrian, military engineering, a Hellenised civilisation

  11. The crisis of the third century and the place of religion in the Roman world

  12. The fall of Rome: Augustine and The City of God

2 one-hour lectures per week, and 1 one-hour tutorial every other week.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (60%). Continuous assessment (40%): one 3,000 word essay (30%); tutorial participation (10%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Tutorials will supply opportunities for formative assessment, but the nature of these will be left to the discretion of the tutors.

Feedback will be given by tutors on tutorial work. Whether oral or written will be left to the discretion of the tutor.
Summative assessment will receive written feedback.

HI 2020
BIRTH OF MODERNITY: POLITICS, CULTURE AND SCIENCE IN EUROPE, 1700-1870
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: TBC

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): This course will be available in 2012/13.

This course introduces students to the crucible of the modern age. Hinging on the American, French and 1848 Revolutions, it explores how men and women in elite and popular communities generated new modes of living, experience and expression and how they understood and manipulated the natural world. Attention will be given to the Enlightenment, Revolutions, Empire, Romanticism and Ideology with interrelated developments in politics, culture and science also being explored. Students will be introduced to the works of figures such as Newton, Voltaire, Paine, Goethe, Marx, Darwin and Nietzsche. Topics will include Salons, the Terror, nationalism and secularisation.

The forging of, and resistance to, new ideas concerning the individual, gender, society, the state and the natural world generated a wide-ranging and vigorous debate, which held at its heart a vital sense of the actors as either self-consciously modern or reactionary. At the core of the course will therefore be a study of the notion of revolutionary change, both in its specifically political and its broader cultural meanings. Thus, the ways in which revolutions were generated across the period, and the impact they held for the populace which created and experienced them will be the central focus of each phase of the course.

The course will be broadly divided into four component elements, outlining the contours of the projects of Enlightenment, Revolution, Romanticism and Ideology. Lectures will highlight emblematic figures in each phase, and themes which link the different phases together. Particular attention will be given to the social context which generated and shaped actors, examining for instance, the rise of a reading public, the professionalisation of cultural activity, and the fragmentation of an ideal of universal knowledge.

Three lectures per week and eight seminars (c.20 students) in the half session.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written exam (40%); continuous assessment: (60%); A document report of 1,000 words (10%); an essay of 3,000 words (40% and tutorial presentation (10%).

Resit: A two-hour written exam worth (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Individual and group work in seminars.

The document report will be returned on a one-to one basis to provide an initial indication of the students' skills and to identify areas for improvement. Similarly the essay will be returned one-to-one. It will build upon the skills identified in the document report, and provide an opportunity for those skills which were identied as weak to be developed. The emphasis will be on teaching academic and transferable skills including written expression, in-depth knowledge, effective synthesis and the conscise and coherent structuring of argument and deployment of information. The exam will assess the extent to which the stduent has fully achieved these objectuves and developed the requisite skill set.

HI 2021
POWER AND PIETY
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M-L Ehrenschwendtner

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): This course will be available in 2012/13.

Between 1100 and 1500 western Europe was undergoing fundamental transformations: new technical, economic and political challenges, fresh developments in religious and intellectual life and catastrophes like wars, diseases and climate change fundamentally shaped European societies for centuries to come. This course offers a thematic survey of medieval western societies with lectures and tutorials focussing on religion, kingship and warfare, economy and environment, cultural renaissances and intellectual novelties, the emergence of national states and identities and the discovery of new worlds.

3 one-hour lectures per week
8 seminars per session.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (40%) and in-course assessment (60%).

Resit: In-course assessment:
meaningful tutorial participation requires the delivery of a presentation and regular participation in group discussions, worth 10% of the final mark.

1 assessed annotated bibliography (1,000-1,500 words), worth 10% of the final mark.

1 assessed essay (2,000-2,500 words), worth 30% of the final mark.

1 documents test (50 minutes), worth 10% of the final mark

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Essay plan.

As formative piece of work, which will be returned on a one to one basis with feedback, the essay plan is designed to indicate how students are progressing in acquiring the key skills of identifying, synthesising and presenting their research and knowledge.

As part of the minor assessed arrangements the document test will test students in the key historical skills of reading and analysing texts/other primary sources critically and emphatically, while addressing questions of genre, content, perspective and purpose.

The assessed essay will build upon the skills identified in the source review while also providing an opportunity to progress in those aspects that were less effectively delivered. The emphasis will be on testing academic attributes, inculding in-depth and extensive knowledge and understanding, the development of concise and coherent structured work which delivers a reasoned, effective and comprehensive analysis.

The exam will test specific academic and generic skills, with an emphasis on breadth of knowledge, the capacity to reformulate and express acquired understanding while also demonstrating a capacity for problem identification and the delivery of structured, coherent and fluent written work.

HI 2520
GLOBAL EMPIRE IN THE LONG NINETEENTH CENTURY
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Dilley

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): This course will be available in 2012/13.

The construction of different forms of global empire (territorial, commercial, cultural) have come to be seen as a major dynamic of modern world history. This course will offer students an overview of many of the key developments of this period. It will also introduce students to the rich and varied literature surrounding the study of empire The course will focus on a range of empires and regions, particularly the British, but at its heart would be the phenomenon of global empire rather than any particular case. The exact content would depend on contributors and their preferred approaches but contributions collectively would focus on four themes providing coherence.

  1. The migration and exchange of people, ideas, goods, and money

  2. The causes and bases of imperial expansion.

  3. The impacts of contact, colonialism, and empire on land, labour, society and identity

  4. The political dialectics of empire: (encompassing the means by which power is created and asserted, subaltern agency in response to colonization, the relations between settlers-metropoles).

3 one-hour lectures and 8 seminars 1 hour (max 20 students) per session.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%) and continuous assessment (50%): e-assessment (10%); 1 Book Review, 1,000 words (10%); one 3,000 Word Essay (30%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Individual and group presentations and discussions.

Individual return and discussion of essays, and feedback on presentations; time set aside in at least one seminar for discussion of assessment, and in at least one lecture for course related issues; staff-student consultative committee.

HI 2521
MEN, WOMEN AND IN BETWEEN
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr F Pedersen

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): This course will be available in 2012/13.

What does it mean to be a 'man' or a 'woman' in Western societies and how have the definitions and expectations of 'manliness' and 'womanliness' changed over time? This course addresses those questions for the period from classical times to the present. Students are introduced to the use of gender as a tool of historical analysis through chronological case studies drawn chiefly from European and British history.

3 lectures per week, 8 seminars per half-session.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (40%); continuous assessment (50%) (for one 3,000-word essay, 10% for seminar participation).

Resit: Examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment will be both formal and informal and will take place both in class and in private.

Feedback will be provided in the classroom and in the discussion of written work.

HI 2522
SUPERPOWERS
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Spelling

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): This course will not be available in 2012/13.

This course explores the emergence of the United States and the Soviet Union as the first two global superpowers by 1945 and their subsequent Cold War confrontation. It concentrates on introducing essential knowledge and key concepts concerning the development of their military and economic strength, together with their respective ideologies of capitalism and communism.

3 one-hour lectures (Tues, Wed and Thur at 11) and 1 one-hour tutorial (to be arranged) per week.

1st attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment (50%) two 2,500 word essays (20% each); class participation (10%).

Resit: 1 two-hour examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Informal assessment of performance in class plus two marks awarded for class participation and presentation completion.

Via written comments on assessed essays and one-to-one discussion ir requested upon collection of material. Exams - can view comments if requested.

 

> Level 3
HC 3001 / HC 3501
THE GRAECO-ROMAN ENVIRONMENT OF THE NEW TESTAMENT
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A D Clarke

Pre-requisite(s): Students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This course is run on a cycle with HC 3002 / HC 3502 Jewish Environment of the New Testament, and will be available in 2012/13 and alternate years thereafter.

This course will be available as HC 3501 in 2012/13.

This course does not count for the purpose of History degree credits.

What we sometimes call the 'background to the New Testament' was the vast Graeco-Roman world, whose influence reached from Britain and Spain to Afghanistan. In the wake of Alexander the Great (356-323 BC) the Mediterranean and Near East reflected a fusion of Greek and local cultures ('Hellenism'). The Romans later adopted and adapted these Greek norms as they imposed their administration, which dominated the eastern Mediterranean through the first Christian centuries. This course explores some of the political, social, cultural, religious, philosophical, and legal conditions in that multi-cultural Graeco-Roman world in which the earliest Christians lived. It will draw on a wide range of ancient literary sources as well as inscriptions, coins, papyri and other material evidence.

1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (60%); continuous assessment (40%), consisting of one essay of 2,500 words.

Resit: Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%), provided each element of assessment is CAS 6 or above. New coursework can be submitted.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment occurs orally throughout the course based on the students' participation in the seminars, their preparation and contribution to the discussions.

Oral feedback will be provided on informal formative assessment; and written feedback on summative continuous assessment. Additionally, students will be able to obtain oral and written feedback on written examination summative assessment.

HC 3002 / HC 3502
THE JEWISH ENVIRONMENT OF THE NEW TESTAMENT
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Professor S Mason

Pre-requisite(s): Open to all level-3 and level-4 students.

Note(s): This course is a companion to the new 'Graeco-Roman Environment of the New Testament'; they will be offered in alternate years.

This course is run on a cycle with HC 3011 / HC 3501 Graeco-Roman Environment of the New Testament, and will be available in 2013/14 and alternate years thereafter.

This course will not be available in 2012/13.

This course does not count for the purpose of History degree credits.

This course covers a pivotal period and region in Western history: Judaea and its regional context from ca. 200 BC. to AD. 200. It will include: an outline of political history (Ptolemaic, Seleucid, Hasmonean, Herodian, and Roman rule), the varied geography of Judaea and its immediate environs in southern Syria, the Judaean Diasporas (with issues of cultural identity), the extensive Jewish literature produced in the period (Philo, Josephus, Dead Sea Scrolls, wisdom literature, biblical exegesis, philosophy), institutions and groups (priesthood, temple, sacrificial cult, Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, Baptists, charismatic prophets and militants, synagogues), and the regional politics of Judaea, with special attention to Rome's attempts at administration and the eruptions of war.

1 two-hour seminar each week.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour examination (60%). One essay of max. 2,500 words (40%).

The exam may be taken only if each and every item of coursework is submitted and assessed at CAS 6 or above.

Resit: 1 two-hour examination (100%).

The exam may be taken only if each and every item of coursework was submitted and assessed at CAS 6 or above.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment occurs naturally in relation to the student's oral contributions (questions, comments, answers, general preparedness) in seminar sessions.

Feedback on the essay will be detailed and prompt. Feedback on the exam will be available on request.

HI 301N
AMERICAN SLAVERY, AMERICAN FREEDOM: US HISTORY 1800-1870
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Professor T Bartlett

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): Students are not permitted to register for this course after the end of week 2 of teaching.

Admission subject to approval by the Head of School. This course will be available at the discretion of the Department of History.

This course offers a study of the main political, constitutional, social and economic developments in the history of the United States from the ratification of the US constitution in 1787 to reconstruction after the Civil War in 1870. Within these broad themes, special attention will be devoted to the paradox of the existence of slavery in a nation dedicated to freedom and to the huge sectional tensions, ending in Civil War, that these gave rise to. Detailed attention will also be paid to the Civil War itself: was this the real American Revolution?

1 one-hour lecture per week; 1 one-hour tutorial per week; 1 one-hour source-class per week.

1st Attempt: Examination (60%) and course work (40%).

Resit: Examination (100%).

HI 301Q
BACK IN THE VIKING HOMELANDS
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Professor S Brink

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): Students are not permitted to register for this course after the end of week 2 of teaching.

Admission subject to approval by the Head of School. This course will be available at the discretion of the Department of History.

This course offers a study of the society, culture and religion in Viking Age Scandinavia. Within these broad themes, special attention will be devoted to the impact from the continent and the Isles, especially regarding the change of religion, the introduction of literacy and the social links between Scandinavia and the rest of Europe. Detailed attention will also be paid to the Christianization process.

2 hours of lecture contact and 1 hour of tutorial contact per week.

1st Attempt: Examination (100%).

Resit: Examination (100%).

HI 303K / HI 353K
THE ENLIGHTENMENT IN FRANCE, BRITAIN AND IRELAND
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Brown

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to student on Programme Year 3 and above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy. This course will be available in 2012/13 as HI 303K.

The Enlightenment represents a key moment in the emergence of a recognisable modernity.
Thinkers like Voltaire, Rousseau, Hume, Smith and Burke provide a distinct approach to society, politics, gender, culture and ethics. Celebrated and condemned, Enlightenment still remains a hotly
contested term. This course investigates the Enlightenment across a series of national contexts. It highlights similarities in thought while remaining sensitive to regional variation. The course introduces
students to the main thinkers and themes, and examines current debates about the content and
legacy of the movement. Lecture topics include anti-clericalism, coffee shop culture, rethinking
domestic life, and Enlightenment and Revolution.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: Presentation (twenty minutes) (10%); Book review (c.1,500 words) (20%).
Source Report (c.1,500 words) (20%).

One source based 'research' paper (c.3,000 words) (50%).

Resit: The re-sit is by examination only (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Each presentor will recive a personal e-mail from the course co-ordinator indicating the mark and assessing the presnetation. the written work will be handed back individually, with a comment sheet atteched and discussed with the student.

HI 303L / HI 303L
THE WEST, THE JEWS, AND ISRAEL, 1789 TO THE PRESENT
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr T Weber

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 and above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy. This course will not be available in 2012/13.

This course explores anti-Semitism and philo-Semitism in Europe and North-America from the age of the French revolution to the present. At the core of the course is the question of how prejudice against Jews (and since 1948 also against Israel) has been tied to the fate of Liberalism and 'Progressive' Thought in Europe and North-America. The first half of the course examines the development of Jewish-gentile relations until the Holocaust. We will, however, try to avoid applying a teleological approach to the period between 1789 and 1941 that reduces the history of gentile attitudes towards Jews to a pre-history of the Holocaust. The second half of the course examines attitudes towards Jews since 1945 in a Europe without a sizeable Jewish community but with an increasingly assertive Jewish Community in America. The course finishes by looking at the 'New Anti-Semitism' and by the involvement of the West in the Middle East Conflict since 1967. The course asks the question whether attitudes and policies towards Israel are best understood in terms of the 'New Anti-Semitism' or in terms of a post-colonial sentiment.

1 two-hour seminar session and 1 one-hour seminar session.

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (100%): 4,000 word essay (60%); oral contribution (5%); presentation (5%), presentation brief (30%).

Resit: 1 three-hour examination (100%): 4,000 word essay (60%); 2,750 word book review (40%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

In individual feedback sessions.

HI 303M / HI 353M
THE HOLOCAUST. ISSUES AND DEBATES
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr C Dartmann

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

This course may not be included in a graduating curriculum with HI 304C / HI 354C (The Third Reich). Students are not permitted to register for this course after the end of week 2 of teaching. This course will not be available in 2012/13.

This history of the Holocaust will be studied through a detailed analysis of contemporary sources, as well as of the major debates and analyses since 1945. Specific emphasis will be placed on the historiographical development of the subject.

1 two-hour and 1 one-hour seminar per week (time to be arranged).

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment; summative assessment (100%): first attempt essay ca. 4,500 words (60%), annotated bibliography, 10 items (20%); class presentation (10%); handout based on presentation (10%).

Resit: Continuous assessment (100%): Essay ca. 4,500 words (60%); annotated bibliography 10 items (20%); book review ca. 1,000 words (20%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Informal feedback, in particular on general expectations at level 3, at beginning of course; informative feedback on individual performance during meeting roughly half way through the course at occasion of essay progress discussion.

Written feedback, individually discussed, on essays, presentations and annotated bibliographies.

HI 303N / HI353N
WAR AND SOCIETY IN THE LATER MIDDLE AGES
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Macdonald

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy. This course will be available in 2012/13.

War was a ubiquitous feature of western Europe during the later middle ages. The course examines not the processes of European wars themselves but their significance in relation to a broad range of societal and governmental themes. Subjects for examination will include the mentalities which underpinned the prevalence of warfare, the experiences of soldiers and non-combatants, women and warfare, the development of national identities and the impact of warfare on governmental structures. The primary, although not exclusive, geographical focus of the course is on Scotland, England and France.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour examination (50%); one 3,000-word essay (40%); Seminar contribution (10%).

Resit: 1 three-hour examination (60%); one 3,000-word essay (40%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Primary source exercises are completed by students and formative assessment is offered by the course co-ordinator.

Verbal feedback is given on all aspects of student performance in individual meetings. Specific written (via essay feedback forms) and verbal feedback is given on essays and primary source exercises.

HI 303P / HI353P
A HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr C Dartmann

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

Students are not permitted to register for this course after the end of week 2 of teaching.

This course will not be available in 2012/13.

The relationship between the state, employers and workers, as well as their respective organisations, contributes in important ways to work-place issues like wages and working conditions; beyond that trade unions, employer organisations and governments discuss and sometimes decide important economic and social issues with an impact far beyond the workplace. In this course we will be looking at the shifting positions of those actors over the 20th century, with a special emphasis on the post WWII period. We will in particular contrast the British with the German experience, but will also try to analyse developments in other areas, in particular the USA, Southern European and Scandinavian countries.

1 two-hour and 1 one-hour seminar per week (time to be arranged).

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment; summative assessment (100%): first attempt essay ca. 4,500 words (60%), annotated bibliography, 10 items (20%); class presentation (10%); handout based on presentation (10%).

Resit: Continuous assessment
resit (100%): essay ca. 4,500 words (60%); annotated bibliography 10 items (20%); book review, ca. 1,000 words (20%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Informal feedback, in particular on general expectations at level 3, at beginning of course; informative feedback on individual performance during meeting roughly half way through the course at occasion of essay progress discussion.

Written feedback, individually discussed, on essays, presentations and annotated bibliographies.

HI 303Q / HI353Q
DECOLONIZATION - THE BRITISH EXPERIENCE
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Dilley

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

This course will not be available in 2012/13.

This course will examine the decline of British imperialism in the twentieth century. It will consider the nature of that decline from a number of perspectives, and consider the different meanings and timings of decolonization in different regions of the empire. The course will also consider the effects of decolonization for both Britain and its former colonies. The course will draw widely on secondary and primary source material, especially BDEEP (British Documents of the End of Empire Project).

1 one-hour lecture; 1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (60%); continuous assessment (40%) (comprising Book Review, 1,000 words, 10% of total; Essay, 3,500 words, 30% of total).

Resit: 1 three-hour examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Weekly readings will be discussed in seminars. A mock exam will also be a part of the course.

The discussion in seminars will provide feedback on work as it progresses. Feedback on the essay, book review and mock exam will be delivered individually. There will also be group feedback on the mock exam.

HI 303R / HI 353R
AZTECS, MAYAS & INCAS: EMPIRES ON THE EVE OF APOCALYPSE
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Professor W G Naphy

Pre-requisite(s): Only available to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This course is now full for 2012/13.

This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

This course will be available as HI 353R in 2012/13.

This course will examine the economies, cultures, religions, and socio-political structures of the three "great" civilizations of Meso- and South America: Aztecs, Mayas, and Incas. Their concepts of wealth, civilization, history, and overall worldviews will be examined in detail. The course will close by considering the status of these empires on the eve of contact with Europeans and the extent to which inherent factors within the empires may have contributed to their collapse and subsequent conquest by the Spanish.

3 hours per week (normally, 1 one-hour seminar and 1 two-hour seminar per week).

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (100%): one 3,000-word essay (40%); 1 comparative article analysis (20%); 1 gobbet exercise (20%); 1 annotated bibliography (10%); 1 group project (10%).

Resit: Continuous assessment (100%): 1 3,000-word essay (40%); 1 comparative article analysis (20%); 1 gobbet exercise (20%); 1 annotated bibliography (10%); 1 group project (10%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Feedback will be in the form of email notification of marks with comments; general remarks on class and on MyAberdeen; and via one, individual face-to-face meeting with each student with feedback on the essay (and more generally).

HI 303S / HI 353S
LATE MEDIEVAL ENGLAND: POLITICS AND SOCIETY 1272-1509
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Armstrong

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

This course will not be available in 2012/13.

This course will examine the diverse political and social changes that shaped England in the later middle ages. It will explore topics including crown and nobility, lordship and social structures, law and peacekeeping, war and diplomacy, and national and regional identities. Presented within a chronological framework, major units of study will concern war with France and within the British Isles, experimentation with and development of parliament and other mechanisms of governance, the impact of the Black Death and the Peasants, Revolt, the role of the church in society, dynastic usurpations and constitutional change.

1 one-hour lecture; 1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour examination (50%);
continuous assessment (50%), consisting of: seminar preparation and participation (10%); book review of approx 800-1,000 words (10%); one essay of approx 3,000-3,500 words, excluding notes and ibliography, on a topic agreed in advance with the course co-ordinator (30%);

Resit: 1 three-hour examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Written and verbal, using private meetings and marking forms.

HI 303T / HI 353T
IMPERIAL RUSSIA 1801-1914
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A J Heywood

Pre-requisite(s): Available to students on Programme year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

This course will examine key issues and events in Russian history during the period 1801-1914. The following themes will be central:

  • Autocracy, opposition and alternatives;

  • International affairs, military might and great-power status;

  • Social problems and the inter-relation of sections of Russian society;

  • Economic problems such as modernisation, industrialisation, finance, communications etc;

  • Problems of a vast contiguous Empire, containing many non-Russian groups, religions and cultures, in an age of imperial competition.

6 two-hour lecture sessions in weeks 1-3 (of which 1 hour is allocated for bibliographic session with library staff in Library).

19 one-hour seminars in weeks 4-11.
1 two-hour seminar with video screening in week 11.

1st Attempt: Annotated bibliography 1,500 words (20%); Primary source exercise 1,500 words (20%); Essay 4,500 words (60%).

Resit: Annotated bibliography 1,500 words (20%); Primary source exercise 1,500 words (20%); Essay 4,500 words (60%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Typed on school forms, and returned in individual meetings with the students.

HI 303U / HI 353U
GERMANY, 1517-1806: REFORMATION, EMPIRE AND ENLIGHTENMENT
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr K Friedrich

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a discipline breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy. This course will be offered in 2012/13 as HI 353U.

Composed of hundreds of principalities, cities, bishoprics and other territories, the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation as Germany was then called - seemed an incoherent patchwork, yet it functioned as a political entity for centuries. This course studies the great diversity of German history at a time of profound transformation, from the onset of the Reformation to the destruction of the Empire by Napoleon in the early years of the nineteenth century. We will look at religious conflict and social rebellion, the impact of war on society, the important role of German cities, the relationship between Empire and territorial states, Baroque culture, the impact of the early Enlightenment, the changing idea of Empire and the development of early national identity. As for much of this time the Empire was a battlefield for the diverse interests of European dynasties in the 'heart of Europe', we will explore the relationship between Germany and its neighbours. The question we have to ask is not why did the Holy Roman Empire fail, but why and how did it survive for such a long period?

1 one-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: 15 minute seminar presentation (10%) of overall assessment; Book review (800-1,000 words) (10%) of overall assessment; Essay (max. 2,500 words) (30%) of overall assessment; 1 three-hour examination (50%) of overall assessment.

Resit: 1 three-hour examination (100%) of overall assessment.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Verbal feedback on seminar presentations and one-to-one meetings on essay planning and bibliographies.

Assessment specific feeback via standard feedback forms is given on the essay.

HI 303V / HI353V
GERMANY, 1806-1914: MAKING AN EMPIRE
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr K Friedrich

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 and above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

This course will be available in 2012/13 as HI 303V.

Modern Germany has often been called the "belated" nation-state. During the first half of the nineteenth century three main political ideologies proved influential: liberalism, socialism and nationalism. Prussia's successful domination of German politics led to the creation of the ultimately ill-fated German Empire in 1871. This course analyses the Empire's political structures and institutions, the influence of the Kaiser and his "court camarilla", the military, the composition of imperial German society, its unprecedented industrial and economic expansion in the 1890s, and the origins of the First World War, with particular emphasis on the lively fin-de-si-cle culture, the history of ideas and political and social movements.

1 one-hour lectures per week; 1 two-hour tutorial per week.

1st Attempt: Examination (60%); Continuous Assessment (40%): (one 3,500-word source-based essay (30%); tutorial participation (10%), peer assessed).

Resit: Examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Verbal feedback is given on all aspects of student performance in individual meetings. Specific written (via essay feedback forms) and verbal feedback is given on essays, primary source reviews and class presentations.

HI 303W / HI 353W
STEWART SCOTLAND 1406-1603
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Armstrong

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

This course will be available in 2012/13 as HI 303W.

This course examines Scotland in the last two centuries of its dynastic independence. Organised chronologically, it will address the rule of the realm under the Stewart dynasty. Kingship, nobility and the exercise of power on the national, regional and local levels will form major themes of this course. It will also examine regicide, regency, and resistance to authority, the relationship between crown, church and nobility, and the development of governmental institutions and offices. Attention will also be given to exploring social and political change, especially with regard to landowners and other power-holders.

1 one-hour lecture, 1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour examination (50%); continuous assessment (50%), consisting of:

  • seminar preparation and participation (10%);

  • book review of about 800-1,000 words (10%);

  • one essay of about 3,000-3,500 words, excluding notes and bibliography, on a topic agreed in advance with the course co-ordinator (30%);

Resit: 1 three-hour examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Written and verbal, using private meetings and marking forms.

HI 303X / HI 353X
THINKING HISTORY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Mackillop

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

This course will be available in 2012/13 as HI 353X.

This course introduces students to how Clio, the Muse of History, has inspired historians to carry out their craft ever since the invention of history as a discipline two and a half thousand years ago. Students examine how and why the way historians have approached the past has evolved over time. In this course, student also practice a number of approaches to the study of history themselves. The course also encourages students to debate the ways in which historical awareness makes an essential contribution to informed and active citizenship.

9 one-hour lectures, 6 one-hour seminar sessions.

During six teaching weeks students will have both a 1 one-hour lecture and 1 one-hour seminar session. During three weeks, they will only have 1 one-hour lecture a week. The three remaining weeks are reading weeks.

1st Attempt: Continuous Assessment (60%): One essay and three one page response papers to be submitted as one document (3,500 words): (60%) Students will be required to write three one-page response papers (of 500 words each) in response to set readings for the first three of the six seminar-style meetings. The texts are meant to introduce students to three different ways to thinking about history. For session 5, students will write a short essay using the same approach as that being used by a major historical work (eg. Robert Darnton's Great Cat Massacre) that students will have read for the fourth seminar-style session. The essay will be based exclusively on a set number of sources provided by the leaders of the seminar-style sessions. For session 6, students will read all the essays of the students from their discussion group and provide feedback to their peers. With the help of that feedback, students will have to rewrite their short essays. Students will then submit their essay (word length: 2,000 words), together with their one-pagers from Week 1 to Week 3 as one document.

1 two-hour degree examination (40%). In the two-hour examination, each student will be required to approach one gobbet each from three series of gobbets. The first gobbet will consist of an excerpt from some historical source. Students will have to explain how this gobbet could be used by different historical approaches. The second set of gobbets will be taken from the three assigned texts that students will have read for the first three of the seminar-style sessions, while the third set of gobbets will be taken from the major historical work that student will have read for Session 4. Each gobbet will carry equal weight.

Resit: Resit examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Orally through seminar group leaders.

HI 303Y / HI 353Y
THE RISE AND FALL OF COLLECTIVE SECURITY: INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, c. 1880-c. 1933
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr T Weber

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 and above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy. This course will not be available in 2012/13.

This course seeks to investigate whether the international system was by and large the source of relative stability in the era between the Crimean War and 1933 or whether the international system made the outbreak of the First World War and the advent of totalitarian fascist and communist regimes all but inevitable. What strategies of collective security were employed during this period? What role did the rise and fall of great powers? (P. Kennedy) play in upsetting the international system? What were the underlying mentalities in the pursuit of foreign policy, ie, what was the role of, eg., social Darwinism, rising nationalism in a world of multi-ethnic empires, the emerging Wilsonian model of international relations, or of militarism in shaping the international system of this era? Did economic and financial considerations lead to the collapse of the system? Did the world experience a first era of globalisation (and if it did how did globalisation affect international relations?) Why did globalisation sink? Does John Mearsheimer?s brand of realism capture realities between 1880 and 1933 successfully? What was the link between public opinion and the formulation of foreign policy (primacy of domestic or of foreign policies)? Is the period of 1880 to 1933 best described as an era with a lack of collective security?

1 two-hour seminar session and 1 one-hour seminar session each week.

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (100%): 4,000 word essay (60%); oral contribution (5%); presentation (5%), presentation brief (30%).

Resit: Continuous assessment (100%): (4,000 word essay (60%); 2,750 word book review (40%)).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

In individual feedback sessions.

HI 303Z / HI 353Z
MEN, WOMEN AND EUNUCHS
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Professor J Stevenson

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students on Programme Year 3 and above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

This course introduces students to the idea of gender as a social construct, while at the same time, teaching them a certain amount about the Byzantine world, focusing particularly on the period from the fourth to sixth centuries. Sexual identity is an extremely important aspect of personal identity in all societies, but by looking at a pre-medieval set of ideas which are in fundamental ways, radically different from our own, students will be helped to think critically and analytically about an area of human experience which is commonly regarded as natural, and not subject to this kind of enquiry.

This course will be available in 2012/13 as HI 303Z.

Week 1
1. Introduction
2. Library session
Week 2
3. What was a man? legally, socially and culturally
4. What was a woman? legally, socially and culturally
Week 3
5. Medical theories of gender and sexuality
6. Christianity and sexuality
Week 4
7 Case study: St Augustine?s Confessions and Late Roman masculinity
8 Emperors: men, or more than men?
Week 5
9 Virgins: a third sex, or superwomen?
10 Subwomen: prostitutes, actresses
Week 6
11 Eunuchs, legally, socially and culturally
12 Eunuchs in fantasy: Case study: Claudian, In Eutropium
Week 7
13 Eunuchs in fact
14 ?Eunuchs for the kingdom of heaven?
Week 8
15 Angels
16 The Virgin Mary
Week 9
17 Motherhood
18 Transcending her sex
Week 10
19 Basileus/basilissa: women as rulers
20 Passing for a man
Week 11
21 Case study: Perpetua's Prison Diary
22 Male homosexuality
Week 12
23 Lesbianism
24 Deviance and Identity

2 one-hour lectures, 1 one-hour tutorial per week.

1st Attempt: Seminar presentation (powerpoint) (10%);
first essay (40%), 2,500 words (50%) second essay, 2,500 words

Resit: One essay 2,500 words (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students are invited to submit plan and bibliography, and to discuss appropriate reading. Formative assessment is delivered using the History department's essay return sheet, which allows focus, structure, content, argument, sources, notes/bibliography, language skills and presentation to be graded separately and the information brought together with comment on the essay as a whole and an overall mark.

Essays are returned individually, and discussed one to one.

HI 304A / HI 354A
CULTURAL HISTORY OF SPORT
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Macdonald

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to student in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

This course will not be available in 2012/13.

This course invites students to consider the study of sport as a way of trying to understand the past. A broad chronological framework will be adopted, tracing sporting activity and pastimes from the medieval period through to modern times. The geographical scope of the course will also be broad, with detailed consideration of themes such as the relevance of sport in the British Empire and developments in twentieth-century American sports. Issues to be addressed will include social class, race, gender, morality and the efforts of various governments to both control and use sport in different eras.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour examination (50%); one 3,000-word essay (40%); seminar contribution (10%).

Resit: 1 three-hour examination (60%); one 3,000-word essay (40%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Primary source exercises are completed by students and formative assessment is offered by the course co-ordinator.

Verbal feedback is given on all aspects of student performance in individual meetings. Specific written (via essay feedback forms) and verbal feedback is given on essays and primary source exercises.

HI 304B / HI 354B
INTERWAR EUROPE. COMPARATIVE ASPECTS OF DOMESTIC POLICIES IN GERMANY, FRANCE AND BRITAIN
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr C Dartmann

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This course is now full for 2012/13.

Students are not permitted to register for this course after the end of week 2 of teaching.

Admission subject to approval by the Head of School. This course will be available at the discretion of the Department of History.

This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

This course will be available in 2012/13 as HI 354B.

Some selected major issues of domestic policies, important in a common way to the three countries, will be examined in a comparative way. Themes may include: social policies, threat of instability/civil war, political parties, experiences of demobilisation and mobilisation, reactions to the world depression, reactions to international developments, in particular eg. the Spanish Civil War, developments in art.

1 two-hour and 1 one-hour seminar per week (time to be arranged).

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment summative assessment (100%): essay ca. 4,500 words (60%), annotated bibliography (20%), 10 items; class presentation (10%); handout based on presentation (10%);

Resit: Continuous assessment
resit (100%): essay ca. 4,500 words (60%); annotated bibliography 10 items (20%); book review, ca. 1,000 words (20%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Informal feedback, in particular on general expectations at level 3, at beginning of course; informative feedback on individual performance during meeting roughly half way through the course at occasion of essay progress discussion.

Written feedback, individually discussed, on essays, presentations and annotated bibliographies.

HI 304C / HI 354C
THE THIRD REICH
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr C Dartmann

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy. This course may not be included in a graduating curriculum with HI 303M / HI 353M (The Holocaust).

This course will not be available in 2012/13.

To study the on-going historical debates on the Third Reich. In this course we will study political, social, and economic aspects of the history of Germany between 1933 and 1945, and put them into a historical, comparative, and European background. Recent historiographical trends and conceptual attempts to grasp the history of the Third Reich will form an integral part of this course.

1 two-hour and 1 one-hour seminar per week (time to be arranged).

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment;
summative assessment (100%): Essay ca. 4,500 words (60%), annotated bibliography (20%), 10 items; class presentation (10%); handout based on presentation (10%).

Resit: Continuous assessment
resit (100%): Essay ca. 4,500 words (60%); annotated bibliography 10 items (20%); book review, ca. 1,000 words (20%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Informal feedback, in particular on general expectations at level 3, at beginning of course; informative feedback on individual performance during meeting roughly half way through the course at occasion of essay progress discussion.

Written feedback, individually discussed, on essays, presentations and annotated bibliographies.

HI 304D / HI 354D
THE BLACK ATLANTIC WORLD: FROM AFRICA TO THE AFRICAN DIASPORA, 1700s-2000s
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr K Salt

Pre-requisite(s): Available to students only in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

This course will be available in 2012/13 as HI 304D.

In 1993, sociologist Paul Gilroy published The Black Atlantic, a text that spurred the creation of something now known as 'the black Atlantic.' Critics use this term to signal a geographical region, a diasporic community of persons who share a past laced with displacement(s) and resistance, and counter-narratives to global modernisms that have obfuscated the voices of African-descended persons. Although inspiration can be found within its field-imaginary, few critics confront what it is and who represents it. This course focuses on these questions by examining the historiography of 'the black Atlantic' from the 18th to the 21st centuries.

Two 90-minute seminars per week.

1st Attempt: Continuous Assessment (100%): 3,500-word Essay (50%); 1,500-word Primary text analysis (25%); three 500-word Response Papers (15%); Participation (10%).

Resit: Continuous Assessment: Essay (50%); one 1,500-word Essay in lieu of Primary text analysis (30%); one 1,500-word Response Paper in lieu of the 3 Response Papers (20%). All materials produced for the resit must represent new work. Previously handed-in course materials will not be accepted.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

In class, students will analyse primary documents and engage in verbal discussions about said materials in an effort to strengthen their analytical skills. These informal exercises will complement the formal assessment programme for the course and enable the students to successfully complete the course requirements.

Students will receive formal feedback on all assessed activities and receive informal feedback during office hours. All students will also be required to formally meet with the course co-ordinator about their Essay topics. During this discussion, students will be informed about their progress within the course and given concrete advise about successfully completed the course requirements.

HI 304E / HI 354E
WAR AND PEACE: ANGLO-SCOTTISH RELATIONS, 1286-1603
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Macdonald

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This course is available to all degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth option for the enhanced study requirement. However, admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

This course will be available in 2012/13 as HI 354E.

After the death of the Scottish King Alexander III in a famous equestrian mishap in 1286 the relations of Scotland and England were radically transformed and featured a prominent new edge in English attempts to assert dominance and Scottish resistance to this. Warfare became a highly significant factor in relations between the realms and the oscillating patterns of war and peace over the centuries are carefully examined to seek an understanding of the forces driving Anglo-Scottish political interaction. The impact of regular war on the borderlands of the two kingdoms will be examined carefully as will a range of less violent international encounters, in the spheres of religion, culture and economy. Themes like cross-border pilgrimage and saintly cults, the experience of migrants from Scotland to England and the dynamics of Anglo-Scottish trade are given close attention.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour examination (50%); one 3,000-word essay (40%); seminar contribution (10%).

Resit: 1 three-hour examination (60%); one 3,000-word essay (40%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Primary source exercises are completed by students and formative assessment is offered by the course co-ordinator.

Verbal feedback is given on all aspects of student performance in individual meetings. Specific written (via essay feedback forms) and verbal feedback is given on essays and primary source exercises.

HI 304F / HI 354F
THE EMPIRE IN THE 'ORIENT': THE BRITISH IN ASIA, 1600-1858
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Mackillop

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

This course will be available in 2012/13 as HI 304F.

This course examines the development of English and, after 1707, British imperial interests in Asia. The approach is both chronological and thematic. It begins by charting the evolution of the English East India Company's mercantile operations in Asia and the development of what contemporaries believed to be a new, virtuous form of commercial empire. After 1750 the Company suddenly and unexpectedly began acquiring substantial territorial interests in India and these, together with rapidly evolving commercial contacts in the Persian Gulf, Indonesia and China, are discussed. The political and ideological repercussions of the crisis in expansion will be explored, as will be the important role of the Scots and the Irish. The final decades of the Company's power in India after the loss of its commercial monopoly in 1813 are charted, as are British efforts at reforming Indian society. The final theme is the 1857 Mutiny, the single most violent indigenous reaction to British rule, an event which revealed the considerable strengths and weaknesses of Britain's empire in Asia.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: 5,000 word essay (50%); 1,500 word review on a contemporary source (20%);
1,500 word report on class presentation (20%);
class participation (including attendance) (10%).

Resit: 5,000 word essay (50%); 1,500 review on contemporary source (25%); 1,500 word report in lieu of class presentation (25%).

All pieces of resit work must be on new subject matter.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students will undertake a 15-20 minute presentation on a specific topic and receive feedback from the co-ordinator and fellow students on matters of analytical, structure and clarity. These points will be incorporated into the final written report on the presentation.

Verbal feedback is given on all aspects of student performance in individual meetings. Specific written (via essay feedback forms) and verbal feedback is given on essays, primary source reviews and class presentations.

HI 304G / HI 354G
'CITY OF THE WORLD': LONDON IN THE LONG EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Mackillop

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

This course will be available in 2012/13 as HI 304G.

By the late seventeenth century London was already one of Western Europe's largest and most important cities; by 1832 it was indisputably a 'world city', dominating processes of imperialism, finance, and international trade. This course focuses on the social and cultural processes that underpinned the city's 'metropolitan' status. It explores how the city acted as human magnate, drawing in immigrants from Britain, Europe, North America, Africa and Asia while acting as the controlling metropolis for Britain's increasingly global empire. It assesses eighteenth-century London politics, elites, the emergence of the 'middling sort', as well as its criminals and its social-sexual outcasts. The class concludes by examing how the city was represented within the vibrant medium of caricature and in the novel by focusing on the themes of life, death and the possibilities of a new 'urban' morality.

1 one-hour Seminar; 1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: 5,000 word essay (50%); 1,500 word source review (20%); 1,500 word report on class presentation (20%); class participation (10%) (including attendance & seminar reports).

Resit: 5,000 word essay (50%); 1,500 word source review (25%); 1,500 word report on topic in lieu of class presentation (25%).

All pieces of resit work must be on new subject matter.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment includes weekly feedback on one page hand written analyses of secondary and primary sources relating to each seminar theme. These formative pieces are submitted weekly and are intended to develop and hone the students' abilities to comprehend, analyse and present arguments and understanding of a wide range of primary and secondary materials. Similarly, and essay plan and bibliography are to be submitted and will be returned with comments, suggestions etc.

Verbal feedback is given on all aspects of student performance in individual meetings. Specific written (via essay feedback forms) and verbal feedback is given on essays, primary source reviews and class presentations.

HI 304H / HI 354H
LAW, SEX, AND MARRIAGE IN THE MIDDLE AGES
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr F Pedersen

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non history degree programmes as a discipline breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non history degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity History and Philosophy.

This course will be available in 2012/13 as HI 354H.

This course investigates how the ideal of a lifelong monogamous marriage became the norm in Western Europe. It examines relevant texts from the period and introduces students to a wide range of sources and approaches to the past. The course consists in a mixture of seminars and lectures and will include both broad overviews and case studies of individual marriages in the Middle Ages. The course is divided into three major sections. The first section discusses the historicity of Western attitudes to marriage and the significance of the institution for academic study. The second section considers medieval attitudes to sex, marriage and the family. The third section investigates how secular and ecclesiastical forces interacted in the ultimately successful attempt to make marriage a matter between individuals rather than families.

Two weekly seminars of 90 minutes.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (60%) and in-course assessment (40%). The in-course assessment consists of one 3,500 word essay.

Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (60%) and in-course assessment (40%). The in-course assessment consists of one 3,500 word essay, which cannot be identical to the previously submitted in-course assessment.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment will be an integral part of the seminars and presentations given by the students. Summative assessment will be provided in writing and if desired through individual discussions of submitted written work.

HI 304J / HI 354J
HISTORICAL RESEARCH FOR VISITING STUDENTS
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr C Dartmann

Pre-requisite(s): Available to Erasmus students only.

Note(s): Students are not permitted to register for this course after the end of week 2 of teaching.

Admission subject to approval by the Head of School. This course will be available at the discretion of the Department of History. This course will be available in 2012/13.

Detailed research on an historical topic agreed by the School and the home university.

2 one-hour supervision sessions.

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment; summative assessment (100%): first attempt submission of about 4,000-5,000 words on the chosen research topic, normally in the form of a critical survey of primary sources and secondary material, and a discussion of methodology.

Resit: Continuous assessment
resit (100%): submission of about 4,000-5,000 words on the chosen research topic, normally in the form of a critical survey of primary sources and secondary material, and a discussion of methodology.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Informal feedback, in particular on general expectations at this level for undertaking research, at beginning of course; informative feedback on individual performance during meetings at occasion of progress discussion.

Written feedback, individually discussed, on final submission.

HI 304K / HI 354K
THE HAITIAN REVOLUTION
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr K Salt

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This course is now full for 2012/13.

This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

This course will be available in 2012/13 as HI 354K.

According to historian Carolyn Fick, "historians, social scientists, political economists and other scholars concerned with colonialism, New World plantation slavery, or slave resistance in general [...] point to the Haitian revolution as a landmark event with ramifications extending far beyond the borders of Haiti itself" (2). This event would spur other slave revolts throughout the Americas, and inspire Latin American revolutionaries in their quest for independence. Although Fick centres on the slaves, there were other political actors at play in the formation of the second republic in the Americas and the first self-avowed black nation in the New World. This course investigates this event in an effort to tease out its complexity and lay bare the tensions between anti-colonialism and plantation economies, and the ways these tensions will play out during and after the Haitian Revolution.

Two 90-minute seminars per week.

1st Attempt: Continuous Assessment (100%): 1,500-word Primary text analysis (40%); seven 500-word Response papers (50%); Participation (10%).

Resit: Continuous Assessment: one 1,500-word Primary text analysis (40%); one 3,500-word Response Paper in lieu of the seven 500-word Response Papers (60%). All materials produced for the re-sit must represent new work. Previously handed in course materials will not be accepted.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

In class, students will analyse primary documents and engage in verbal discussions about said materials in an effort to strengthen their analytical skills. These informal exercises complement the formal assessment programme for the course and enable the students to successfully complete the course requirements.

Students will receive formal feedback on all assessed activities and receive informal feedback during scheduled interviews set to take place mid-way throug the course. At this meeting, feedback will be given regarding performance and students will be given concrete advice about the successful completion of the course requirements.

HI 304L / HI 354L
EMIGRANTS AND IMMIGRANTS
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Professor M Harper

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History and Philosophy.

Large-scale demographic upheaval has been a major feature of the social, economic, political and cultural history of the modern world. This course examines the causes and repercussions of emigration and immigration over more than two centuries, looking primarily at the British Isles, but also considering - for comparative purposes - other European countries, as well as the locations where the emigrants settled. Particular attention is paid to the expectations and experiences of participants, in a course which is structured thematically rather than chronologically. Students will be encouraged to identify significant continuities and changes in the history of migration, and the evaluation of original sources is integral to the course.

Two 1.5-hour seminars per week.

1st Attempt: One 3,000-word essay (40%); 1 two-hour written examination (40%); one 700-word book review (10%); class participation (including attendance and seminar presentations) (10%).

Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment includes individual verbal feedback on seminar participation and written feedback on seminar presentations.

Verbal feedback is given on all aspects of student performance, including class presentations, in individual meetings. Specific written freeback on essays and book reviews is given via essay feedback forms, as well as in one-to-one discussion.

HI 304M / HI 354M
POWER AND TRADITIONS: FRANCE 1799-1900
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr E Macknight

Pre-requisite(s): Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a discipline breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

Questions about who exercised power and why resonated at every level of nineteenth-century French society. The Revolution of 1789 had brought about fundamental reforms to the political and social order in France. It set down the roots of the French republican tradition whose supporters became locked in an ongoing ideological struggle against conservative political and social elites. This course examines the myriad forms that power took in French society, from Napoleon?s coup d??tat of 18 Brumaire to the early Third Republic. It deals with the power of political and military leaders to legislate and lead armies. It investigates the gendered implications of power operating within families and between men and women. It also unpacks the ways in which class shaped power relations, and the significance of class-based traditions, within the social fabric of nineteenth-century France.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment (50%).
3,000 word essay (40%)
exam (50%)
class presentation (10%) (of which 5% students' peer assessment and 5% course coordinator assessment).

Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Preparation of an essay outline and bibliography.

Written feedback.

HI 304N / HI 354N
FRIENDS, FOES AND INTERESTS: 20th CENTURY AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Spelling

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in programme year 3 and above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

Former American Secretary of State Henry Kissinger once stated that ?America has no friends, only interests. The aim of this course is to look at selected aspects of US Foreign Policy from c.1898 until 2000, to see in what ways those policies changed and developed over the century and to see if Kissinger's comment was based in fact! Did America become the policeman of the world? for altruistic reasons (eg., the spreading of democracy), or were her motives purely based on self interest (eg., financial or political gain) or was it a little of both Notice will be taken of the individual Presidents and their Secretaries of State, and of others who influenced foreign policy, starting with the US's one real foray into traditional imperialism the Spanish American War of 1898. We will also look at Constitutional constraints on foreign policy and its formulators.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 two-hour tutorial per week.

1st Attempt: Assessment is by means of one written essay of 4,000 words (40% of overall assessment); 1 three-hour exam (50%); and individual presentation (10%).

Resit: 1 three-hour exam (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Written comments on feedback sheets and one-to-one discussions.

HI 304S / HI 354S
SCOTLAND: A SOCIOLOGICAL HISTORY
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Professor Andrew Blaikie

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

How might we explain the origins of our understanding of contemporary Scotland? This course provides a thematic interpretation of one country by relating relevant social theories to questions of nationhood, identity and culture and considering the cultural impact of economic and social change from the mid-eighteenth century to the present day. Pervasive myths surrounding community, egalitarianism and difference from England are explored in relation to a wide range of topics including: industrial development and decline, education and empire, immigration and emigration, sectarianism, political allegiance, tourism and heritage.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week for 11 weeks. [Seminars to include some group work.]

1st attempt: one three-hour examination (60%); in-course written assessment (30%); participation, including presentation (10%).

1 three-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment includes feedback on seminar performance, presentation, and discussion on essay planning and readings.

Verbal feedback is given on all aspects of student performance in individual meetings. Specific written (via essay feedback forms) and verbal feedback is given on essays and class presentations.

HI 304U / HI 354U
THE MAKING OF MODERN IRELAND
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Professor T Bartlett

Pre-requisite(s): Available to students in Programme Year 3.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

The course, The Making of Modern Ireland, 1800-2010, offers a detailed survey and analysis of the major political, social and economic developments on the island of Ireland from the Act of Union to the economic crisis of 2008-12. Key features of the course will include the emergence of constitutional and physical force movements in this period, the development of Irish nationalism and unionism, and the creation of two Irelands in the twentieth century. A special focus will be placed on the Irish Famine of the 1840s and on the experiences of the Irish abroad, the diaspora.

Week 1 - introduction union and state of the nation
Week 2 - Catholic emancipation
Week 3 - famine
Week 4 - Irish Diaspora
Week 5 - Parnell
Week 6 - Cultural Revival
Week 7 - Ulster will fight
Week 8 - Irish revolution 1916 - 1923
Week 9 - The two Ireland's 1923 to 1950
Week 10 - TBC
Week 11 - The troubles and peace making
Week 12 - Bust Boom - Bust

One one hour lecture and one two hour seminar per week.

First attempt: Continuous assessment: research essay, 50%, ca 3500 words, Two source reports 25% each.

Resit: Continuous assessment - research essay, 50%, ca 3500 words, Two source reports 25% each

Only results obtained at first attempt can be used for Honours classification.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Feedback will be given during office hours and by appointment.

HI 304V / HI 354V
VISUALIZING THE MODERN: PHOTOGRAPHY AND FILM IN SCOTLAND, 1840-1980
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Professor A Blaikie

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will de at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History and Philosophy.

Photography and film are synonymous with industrial modernisation, but how did these new forms of technology affect the ways in which the nation was understood? With a focus on sources and interpretation, this course examines how culture is produced in the dialogue between historical narrative and visual representation. Having considered the contribution of pre-existing forms such as painting in conveying a distinctive iconography, the analysis investigates the work of commercial photographers during the nineteenth and early twentieth century. This is followed by an exploration of the documentary, firstly via photojournalism, and secondly through film. Case studies then explore the complex role of visual material in ethnology and memory studies.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week for 11 weeks. Seminars to include some group work.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour examination (50%); in-course written assessment (40%); participation, including presentation (10%).

Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment includes feedback on seminar performance, presentation, and discussion on essay planning and readings.

Verbal feedback is given on all aspects of student performance in individual meetings. Specific written (via essay feedback forms) and verbal feedback is given on essays and class presentations.

HI 305D / HI 355D
NUTS AND BOLTS: HISTORY, TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE, 1750-2000
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr B Marsden

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

Students are not permitted to register for this course after the end of week 2 of teaching.

This course introduces the cultural history of technology in the modern period. What do the 'nuts and bolts' of history reveal about societies, nations and economies? How have people reacted to radical innovations in print production, transport (rail, steamships, automobiles, flight), communication (telegraphs, radio and the mobile phone), and leisure (gramophone, cinema, television)? As the computer and the World Wide Web rapidly transform our own experiences and capacities, we reflect on past reactions when old technologies were new ? as cities were networked with power and electrical lighting intruded into the home. As well as 'impacts' and uses, we consider the innovation and meaning of these mechanisms and machines. ?To do so we explore broader themes like the tools of empire, the industrialization of the domestic sphere, and the commemoration of the inventor.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour examination (60%); continuous assessment (40%) with: one 3,000-word essay (30%) and seminar performance including presentation (10%).

Resit: 1 three-hour examination (60%); one 3,500-word essay (40%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Informal feedback, in particular on general expectations at level 3, at beginning of course; feedback on individual performance in presentation in person or by e-mail; written feedback, individually discussed, on essays and presentations.

HI 305E / HI 355E
LAWYERS AND LECHERS IN THE MIDDLE AGES: THE MEDIEVAL CHURCH COURTS AS EVIDENCE FOR MEDIEVAL LIFE
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr F Pedersen

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 and above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

Canon law touched the life of every inhabitant of Western Europe in the Middle Ages: it could protect the murderer, it allowed for the speedy resolution of conflicts over debt, it developed an anthropology of human sexuality in its attempts to guarantee that marriage lived up to its high Christian ideals, and in many ways salvation itself was a matter of law. The later medieval papacy functioned increasingly as a source of this law. Between 1200 and 1300, the majority of cardinals and popes were not graduates in theology, but canon law. The personnel of embassies in international diplomacy were selected from university law graduates, such that the very language of inter-state discourse became a legal language, and one of its principal components was canon law. ?

36 class-room hours in one half session comprising a mixture of seminars, lectures and student presentations.

1st Attempt: 5,000 word essay (75%); 1,000 word presentation report (25%).

Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students will present papers on chosen topics.

Written feedback will be provided to essays, presentations and response papers.

HI 305F / HI 355F
A MILITARY REVOLUTION? WAR, STATE AND SOCIETY IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE, 1500-1800
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Professor R Frost

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

Students are not permitted to register for this course after the end of week 2 of teaching.

The course will consider the main technological changes in warfare in this period, and consider their impact on the conduct of warfare. It will look at the ways in which states responded to these changes, and the impact of warfare upon European society. Students will choose to look at individual countries or topics in their presentations and essays.

2 one-and-a-half hour seminar sessions per week.

1st Attempt: Third Year: One written examination: three questions (60%); one 3,000-word essay (30%); one presentation (5% mark of course coordinator, 5% marked by peer assessment).

Fourth Year: One written examination: two questions (40%); one 3,000-word essay (30%); one 1,500-word historiographical review essay (20%); one presentation (5% mark of course coordinator, 5% marked by peer assessment).

Resit: 1 three-question examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Informal feedback sessions held on all written work and presentations.

Formal written feedback provided on all written work and presentations.

Informal individual meetings to provide feeback on all written work and presentations.

HI 305G / HI 355G
KINGS, QUEENS, REVOLUTIONARIES AND OUTLAWS: THE POLITICS AND HISTORY OF THE CARIBBEAN
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr K Salt

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Level 4 version available only to students in Programme Year 4. Candidates completing the Level 3 version may not enrol on the Level 4 option.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

Caribbeanist J. Michael Dash describes the Caribbean as 'an archipelago' that has been 'subject to mythification from the outside'. As a region central to the expansion of European empires, the Caribbean is a central actor in the story of modernity and a pivotal space with which to trace questions of liberty, freedom, equality, governance, and environmental change over time. Rather than situate the Caribbean as an outside force where European issues and themes merely come into it, this course aims to re-draw history and place the Caribbean as its own historical site, offering an archival history and a legacy all its own.

Sociologist Mimi Sheller argues that 'the shores that Columbus first stumbled upon now appear only in tourist brochures, or in occastional disaster tales involving hurricanes, boat-people, drug barons, dictators, or revolutions'. This course provides students with an entirely different figuration of the Caribbean. Through an examination of its Kings, Queens, Revolutionaries, and Outlaws, the course offers a historiography of the Caribbean that places significant figures, such as Queen Nanny of the Maroons, at the centre of the region's history. Through this lens, students will survey critical aspects of the French, Spanish, British, American, African and Dutch world that churned, agitated, and developed in intriguing ways within the Caribbean Basin.

1 two-hour seminar per week
1 one-hour lecture per week.

1st Attempt: At level 3
Continuous Assessment (100%).

Participation at 10%
One Bibliographic Review Essay (c. 1000) at 15%
One Primary Text Analysis (c. 1000) at 25%
One Soucrbook proposal (c. 3500) at 50%

All materials produced for the re-sit must represent new work. Previously handed in course materials will not be accepted.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

In class, students will analyse primary documents and engage in verbal discussions about said materials in an effort to strengthen their analytical skills. These informal exercises complement the formal assessment programme for the course and enable the students to successfully complete the course requirements.

Students will receive formal feedback on all assessed activities and receive informal feedback during scheduled interviews set to take place mid-way through the course. At this meeting, feedback will be given regarding performance and students will be given concrete advice about the successful completion of the course requirements.

HI 305H / HI 355H
THE SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION: KNOWING THE NATURAL WORLD 1500-1800
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr B Marsden

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

Students are not permitted to register for this course after the end of week 2 of teaching.

'Knowledge is power', Bacon claimed. Between 1500 and 1700, Copernicus moved the sun to the centre of the cosmos, Harvey argued for the blood's circulation, and Newton discarded a closed world for an infinite universe. Historians once talked freely of a 'Scientific Revolution' establishing 'modern' views of the natural world and reducing Renaissance and Reformation to mere episodes. Here we investigate precisely how and why early modern figures re-assessed ancient learning and created new and potent ways of knowing ? from magic to mechanism. To understanding these changes we study religion and political divisions, print cultures, institutions and gender roles; we delve into 'cabinets of curiosity' stuffed with exotica and instruments; and we follow Galileo, 'courtier', as he struggled with the papacy to promote new sciences. The aftermath of this 'Scientific Revolution' would be the eighteenth-century Enlightenment.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour examination (60%); continuous assessment (40%) with: one 3,000-word essay (30%) and seminar performance including presentation (10%).

Resit: For level 3 students:
1 three-hour examination (60%); one 3,500-word essay (40%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Informal feedback, in particular on general expectations at level 3, at beginning of course; feedback on individual performance in presentation in person or by e-mail; written feedback, individually discussed, on essays and presentations.

HI 305J / HI 355J
RUNES AND THEIR RECEPTION
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr T Wills

Pre-requisite(s): Level 4 version available only to students in Programme Year 4. Candidates completing the Level 3 version may not enrol in the level 4 option.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

For over a millenium, runes were used as an alphabet by various groups in the Germanic world, culminating in thousands of stone monuments in Sweden, and similar numbers of portable inscriptions in urban settlements. The first part of this course explores the ways in which runes were used in early Scandinavia, on both portable items and monuments, and during the Migration Age, Viking Age and post-conversion Middle Ages. The second part of the course looks at the way in which they were reused and reinterpreted, from 13th-century Denmark and Iceland through to the 20th and 21st centuries. This includes the debates regarding runes in the 17th and 18th centuries in Scandinavia, the use of runes in Nazism, and the recent re-emergence of runic divination and other uses.

3 hours of seminars per week (two-hours plus one-hour).

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (100%) comprising:
Essay (4,000 words; 50%)
Book review (1,000 words; 20%)
Presentation including powerpoint and 1000-word report (20%); Seminar participation (10%).

Resit: A new essay of 3,500 words (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Written and verbal, using private meetings and marking forms.

HI 305K / HI 355K
OLD NORSE LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr T Wills

Pre-requisite(s): Level 4 version available only to students in Programme Year 4. Candidates completing the Level 3 version may not enrol in the level 4 option.

Note(s): This course is available to students on all degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-Scandinavian Studies or non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History and Philosophy.

Old Norse is the Latin of the North: it preserves a wide range of some of the most important and exciting texts for understanding early Scandinavian history, society and religion. Students will get an understanding of the different types of sources in Old Norse and the kinds of historical and social information about early Scandinavia that can be gained from them. The language component of this course focuses on using the language for reading and understanding real Old Norse texts from the beginning, with the aid of printed and web-based resources.

3 hours of seminars per week (one-hour plus two-hours).

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (100%) comprising:
Essay (4,000 words; 40%)
In-class language tests (30%)
Presentation including powerpoint and 1,000-word report (20%)
Seminar participation (10%)

Resit: A new essay of 3,500 words incorporating translations of Old Norse texts (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

- Essay outline due in week 10
- Additional in-class language tests

Written and verbal, using private meetings and marking forms
- An essay outline will be handed in for feedback before the final seminar.
- Formative in-class tests will help students prepare for the summative tests.
- Continuous assessment will provide ongoing feedback to students.

PH 303G / PH 353G
OBJECTS AND PROPERTIES
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr D Edwards

Pre-requisite(s): This course is for students in Programme Year 3 or above.

The world is populated with many different objects: tables, chairs, roses, fire engines, blades of grass and human beings, to name just a few, each occupying their own special region of space-time. When we distinguish between them, though, we often don't just make use of the idea that they exist in different locations, we also talk about the different features, attributes, or properties that they have. For instance, you and I have the property of being human, whereas tables and chairs do not. Conversely, the properties that objects have also help us to make sense of the ways in which distinct objects are similar: roses and fire engines are similar in an important way, as are you and I, because of the properties they, and we, share. The main aim of this course is to explore the main theories of properties, including the views that properties are universals, that properties are constructed from tropes, and that properties are classes, or sets, of objects. The course will chart these central positions in the debate, and note their strengths and weaknesses. It will also address the main challenge to views that take properties seriously - that posed by Quine - which argues that we do not need properties to do any interesting explanatory work. It will also address the question of what a theory of properties is intended to do, and take seriously the question of whether any single theory of properties is able to account for all the features properties have been taken to have. It will also explore the wider implications of debates about properties for those engaged in debates elsewhere in philosophy, and will cover some key issues in contemporary metaphysics, philosophy of language and metaethics, such as philosophical methodology, naturalism, reduction and supervenience, ontological commitment, possible worlds, and realism and anti-realism.

One 90 minute lecture, plus one 90 minute tutorial for Level 3 students, plus one 90 minute student-led seminar for Level 4 students per week. (Thus, each student will have 3 contact hours per week.) Tutorials/seminars begin in week 2.

1st Attempt: Two 2,500 word essays (100%).

Resit for year 3 students: One 2,500 word essay (100%).

In line with School Policy, failure to submit a component piece of assessed work, or submitting a token piece, will result in the withdrawal of the class certificate (students are not eligible for resit).

If a component piece of assessed work is submitted and marked 0-5, students cannot pass the course on the first attempt. The student is automatically entitled to resit, and must resit in order to pass the course.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Feedback on essays; individually arranged conversations during office hours/by appointment; feedback on in-class presentations.

Written on essay and marking sheet; office hours/appointment; peer questions and comments during in-class presentations.

 

> Level 4

PLEASE NOTE: Resit: (for Honours students only): Candidates achieving a CAS mark of 6-8 may be awarded compensatory level 1 credit. Candidates achieving a CAS mark of less than 6 will be required to submit themselves for re-assessment and should contact the Course Co-ordinator for further details.

HI 4015
SPECIAL SUBJECT I
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Armstrong

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to Senior Honours candidates in History.

Note(s): Students are not permitted to register for this course after the end of week 2 of teaching.

An intensive study of a limited historical theme, problem or period on the basis of prescribed primary sources and other materials. Precise details of the subjects available reflecting current research interests of staff, will be announced to Honours candidates during the preceding session. Topics covered in previous years include: Vikings c800-1200; Canon Law and Lawyers in the Middle Ages; Scotland, England and Ireland 1286-1329; The Anglo-Scottish Frontier in the Later Middle Ages; The Revival of Millenariansism in Post-Reformation Britain, Europe & America; Irish Political Thought; Scotland, England and The Acts of Union, 1707; The American Revolution; The French Revolution; The Scot in Canada; The Indian Mutiny, 1857; Women, Work and Welfare in Europe c1918-39; The USA in the 1920s; Politics and Culture during the Wilson Years: Britain c1956-76.

Two 1½ to two-hour seminars per week.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (100%).

HI 403G / HI 453G
OBJECTS AND PROPERTIES
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr D Edwards

Pre-requisite(s): This course is for students in Programme Year 3 or above.

The world is populated with many different objects: tables, chairs, roses, fire engines, blades of grass and human beings, to name just a few, each occupying their own special region of space-time. When we distinguish between them, though, we often don't just make use of the idea that they exist in different locations, we also talk about the different features, attributes, or properties that they have. For instance, you and I have the property of being human, whereas tables and chairs do not. Conversely, the properties that objects have also help us to make sense of the ways in which distinct objects are similar: roses and fire engines are similar in an important way, as are you and I, because of the properties they, and we, share. The main aim of this course is to explore the main theories of properties, including the views that properties are universals, that properties are constructed from tropes, and that properties are classes, or sets, of objects. The course will chart these central positions in the debate, and note their strengths and weaknesses. It will also address the main challenge to views that take properties seriously - that posed by Quine - which argues that we do not need properties to do any interesting explanatory work. It will also address the question of what a theory of properties is intended to do, and take seriously the question of whether any single theory of properties is able to account for all the features properties have been taken to have. It will also explore the wider implications of debates about properties for those engaged in debates elsewhere in philosophy, and will cover some key issues in contemporary metaphysics, philosophy of language and metaethics, such as philosophical methodology, naturalism, reduction and supervenience, ontological commitment, possible worlds, and realism and anti-realism.

One 90 minute lecture, plus one 90 minute tutorial for Level 3 students, plus one 90 minute student-led seminar for Level 4 students per week. (Thus, each student will have 3 contact hours per week.) Tutorials/seminars begin in week 2.

1st Attempt: Two 3,500 word essays (90%) plus seminar presentation (10%).

Resit: There is no resit for year 4 students.

In line with School Policy, failure to submit a component piece of assessed work, or submitting a token piece, will result in the withdrawal of the class certificate (students are not eligible for resit).

If a component piece of assessed work is submitted and marked 0-5, students cannot pass the course on the first attempt. The student is automatically entitled to resit, and must resit in order to pass the course.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Feedback on essays; individually arranged conversations during office hours/by appointment; feedback on in-class presentations.

Written on essay and marking sheet; office hours/appointment; peer questions and comments during in-class presentations.

HI 405D / HI 455D
NUTS AND BOLTS: HISTORY, TECHNOLOGY AND CULTURE, 1750-2000
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr B Marsden

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy. Students are not permitted to register for this course after the end of week 2 of teaching.

This course introduces the cultural history of technology in the modern period. What do the 'nuts and bolts' of history reveal about societies, nations and economies? How have people reacted to radical innovations in print production, transport (rail, steamships, automobiles, flight), communication (telegraphs, radio and the mobile phone), and leisure (gramophone, cinema, television)? As the computer and the World Wide Web rapidly transform our own experiences and capacities, we reflect on past reactions when old technologies were new ? as cities were networked with power and electrical lighting intruded into the home. As well as 'impacts' and uses, we consider the innovation and meaning of these mechanisms and machines. ?To do so we explore broader themes like the tools of empire, the industrialization of the domestic sphere, and the commemoration of the inventor.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour examination (40%); continuous assessment (60%) with: one 3,000-word essay (30%), one 1,500-word historiographic review (20%) and seminar performance including presentation (10%).

Resit: No resits.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Informal feedback, in particular on general expectations at level 3, at beginning of course; feedback on individual performance in presentation in person or by e-mail; written feedback, individually discussed, on essays and presentations.

HI 405E / HI 455E
LAWYERS AND LECHERS IN THE MIDDLE AGES: THE MEDIEVAL CHURCH COURTS AS EVIDENCE FOR MEDIEVAL LIFE
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr F Pedersen

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 and above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

Canon law touched the life of every inhabitant of Western Europe in the Middle Ages: it could protect the murderer, it allowed for the speedy resolution of conflicts over debt, it developed an anthropology of human sexuality in its attempts to guarantee that marriage lived up to its high Christian ideals, and in many ways salvation itself was a matter of law. The later medieval papacy functioned increasingly as a source of this law. Between 1200 and 1300, the majority of cardinals and popes were not graduates in theology, but canon law. The personnel of embassies in international diplomacy were selected from university law graduates, such that the very language of inter-state discourse became a legal language, and one of its principal components was canon law. ?

36 class-room hours in one half session comprising a mixture of seminars, lectures and student presentations.

1st Attempt: 5,000 word essay (75%); 1,000 word presentation report and 1,000 word response paper (25%).

Resit: Not normally available.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students will undertake chairing and also respond to papers by level 3 students.

Written feedback will be provided to essays, presentations and response papers.

HI 405G / HI 455G
KINGS, QUEENS, REVOLUTIONARIES AND OUTLAWS: THE POLITICS AND HISTORY OF THE CARIBBEAN
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr K Salt

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above. Level 4 version available only to students in Programme Year 4. Candidates completing the Level 3 version may not enrol on the Level 4 option.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

Caribbeanist J. Michael Dash describes the Caribbean as 'an archipelago' that has been 'subject to mythification from the outside'. As a region central to the expansion of European empires, the Caribbean is a central actor in the story of modernity and a pivotal space with which to trace questions of liberty, freedom, equality, governance, and environmental change over time. Rather than situate the Caribbean as an outside force where European issues and themes merely come into it, this course aims to re-draw history and place the Caribbean as its own historical site, offering an archival history and a legacy all its own.

Sociologist Mimi Sheller argues that 'the shores that Columbus first stumbled upon now appear only in tourist brochures, or in occastional disaster tales involving hurricanes, boat-people, drug barons, dictators, or revolutions'. This course provides students with an entirely different figuration of the Caribbean. Through an examination of its Kings, Queens, Revolutionaries, and Outlaws, the course offers a historiography of the Caribbean that places significant figures, such as Queen Nanny of the Maroons, at the centre of the region's history. Through this lens, students will survey critical aspects of the French, Spanish, British, American, African and Dutch world that churned, agitated, and developed in intriguing ways within the Caribbean Basin.

1 two-hour seminar per week
1 one-hour lecture per week.

1st Attempt: Continuous Assessment (100%).
5,000 word essay (50%); 1,500 Primary Text Analysis (15%);
1,000 word presentation report and 1,000 word response paper (25%); seminar participation (10%).

Resit: Continuous Assessment (100%).

One Bibliographic Review Essay (c. 1000) at 20%
One Primary Text Analysis (c. 1000) at 30%
One Soucrbook proposal (c. 3500) at 50%

All materials produced for the re-sit must represent new work. Previously handed in course materials will not be accepted.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

In class, students will analyse primary documents and engage in verbal discussions about said materials in an effort to strengthen their analytical skills. These informal exercises complement the formal assessment programme for the course and enable the students to successfully complete the course requirements.

Students will receive formal feedback on all assessed activities and receive informal feedback during scheduled interviews set to take place mid-way through the course. At this meeting, feedback will be given regarding performance and students will be given concrete advice about the successful completion of the course requirements.

HI 405H / HI 455H
THE SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION: KNOWING THE NATURAL WORLD 1500-1800
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr B Marsden

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

Students are not permitted to register for this course after the end of week 2 of teaching.

'Knowledge is power', Bacon claimed. Between 1500 and 1700, Copernicus moved the sun to the centre of the cosmos, Harvey argued for the blood's circulation, and Newton discarded a closed world for an infinite universe. Historians once talked freely of a 'Scientific Revolution' establishing 'modern' views of the natural world and reducing Renaissance and Reformation to mere episodes. Here we investigate precisely how and why early modern figures re-assessed ancient learning and created new and potent ways of knowing ? from magic to mechanism. To understanding these changes we study religion and political divisions, print cultures, institutions and gender roles; we delve into 'cabinets of curiosity' stuffed with exotica and instruments; and we follow Galileo, 'courtier', as he struggled with the papacy to promote new sciences. The aftermath of this 'Scientific Revolution' would be the eighteenth-century Enlightenment.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour examination (40%); continuous assessment (60%) with: one 3,000-word essay (30%), one 1,500-word historiographic review (20%) and seminar performance including presentation (10%).

Resit: No resits.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Informal feedback, in particular on general expectations at level 3, at beginning of course; feedback on individual performance in presentation in person or by e-mail; written feedback, individually discussed, on essays and presentations.

HI 405J / HI 455J
RUNES AND THEIR RECEPTION
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr T Wills

Pre-requisite(s): Level 4 version available only to students in Programme Year 4. Candidates completing the Level 3 version may not enrol in the level 4 option.

Note(s): This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.

For over a millenium, runes were used as an alphabet by various groups in the Germanic world, culminating in thousands of stone monuments in Sweden, and similar numbers of portable inscriptions in urban settlements. The first part of this course explores the ways in which runes were used in early Scandinavia, on both portable items and monuments, and during the Migration Age, Viking Age and post-conversion Middle Ages. The second part of the course looks at the way in which they were reused and reinterpreted, from 13th-century Denmark and Iceland through to the 20th and 21st centuries. This includes the debates regarding runes in the 17th and 18th centuries in Scandinavia, the use of runes in Nazism, and the recent re-emergence of runic divination and other uses.

3 hours of seminars per week (two-hours plus one-hour).

1st Attempt: Essay (4,000 words; 50%)
Literature review (1,000 words; 20%)
Presentation report and response paper (two 1,000 words; 20%)
Seminar participation (10%)

Resit: A new essay of 3,500 words (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Written and verbal, using private meetings and marking forms.

HI 405K / HI 455K
OLD NORSE LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr T Wills

Pre-requisite(s): Level 4 version available only to students in Programme Year 4. Candidates completing the Level 3 version may not enrol in the level 4 option.

Note(s): This course is available to students on all degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-Scandinavian Studies or non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History and Philosophy.

Old Norse is the Latin of the North: it preserves a wide range of some of the most important and exciting texts for understanding early Scandinavian history, society and religion. Students will get an understanding of the different types of sources in Old Norse and the kinds of historical and social information about early Scandinavia that can be gained from them. The language component of this course focuses on using the language for reading and understanding real Old Norse texts from the beginning, with the aid of printed and web-based resources.

3 hours of seminars per week (one-hour plus two-hours).

1st Attempt: Essay incorporating a historiographical review (4,000 words; 40%)
In-class language tests (30%)
Presentation report and response paper (two 1,000 words; 20%)
Seminar participation (10%)

Resit: A new essay of 3,500 words incorporating translations of Old Norse texts (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

- Essay outline due in week 10
- Additional in-class language tests

Written and verbal, using private meetings and marking forms
- An essay outline will be handed in for feedback before the final seminar.
- Formative in-class tests will help students prepare for the summative tests.
- Continuous assessment will provide ongoing feedback to students.

HI 4512
SPECIAL SUBJECT II
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Professor S Brink

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to Senior Honours candidates in History.

Note(s): Students are not permitted to register for this course after the end of week 2 of teaching. This course will be available in 2012/13.

A dissertation of about 10,000 words on a topic normally related to that studied in HI 4015.

Each student will be assigned a supervisor, who will make available regular consultation times.

1st Attempt: Dissertation (100%).

HI 4515
GENERAL HISTORICAL PROBLEMS
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Mackillop

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to Senior Honours candidates in History.

Note(s): Students are not permitted to register for this course after the end of week 2 of teaching.

Problems of historical scholarship including the history of historical research, historiography, philosophy of history, links with other academic disciplines, and the relevance of history to the outside world.

6 two-hour seminars.

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (60%) comprising; one essay and three one-page response papers, totalling 3,500 words (40%); work placement or comparative seminar report (in lieu), 1200 words (20%)]; 1 two-hour timed examination (40%).

HI 4516
UNDERGRADUATE DISSERTATION IN HISTORY
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Ehrenschwendtner

Pre-requisite(s): The dissertation is only open to students in joint-single honours History at Programme Year 4.

Note(s): This course is only available to students with a degree intention in History (single or joint honours). It is not available as a Disciplinary breadth option. This course will be available in 2013/14.

Students will

  1. frame an original and significant research question and to address it
  2. identify relevant primary and secondary materials and to make appropriate use of them
  3. criticise and evaluate such primary and secondary materials
  4. identify and present the key issues raised by your research
  5. offer a clear argument with coherent organisation and presentation of relevant facts and development of ideas.

Two hours of a preliminary lecture to introduce students to the task, arranged in the first semester before students start their work on the project.

Students will undertake their independent research under the supervision of a member of History staff. Most of the work of the dissertation will be done independently, as students focus on their individual projects.

1st Attempt: dissertation, 10,000-12,000 words (100%).

Resit: Normally, there is no resit available at level 4.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students will submit

  1. a bibliography
  2. an extended outline to prepare their dissertation.

Markers will provide timeous and individual feedback to students on all assignments. They will inform students of their individual dissertation CAS marks.