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GAELIC

See also Celtic

> Level 1
GH 1007
GAELIC FOR BEGINNERS 1A
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Marsaili MacLeod

Pre-requisite(s): None. 

Co-requisite(s): All students are strongly advised to take GH 1010 Gaelic Reading for Beginners 1A.

Note(s): This course may not be taken by students who qualify for Gaelic Language 1A or any other more advanced courses.

The course will develop a basic understanding of the Gaelic language through focussing on all four linguistic skills: reading, writing, speaking, listening comprehension. Students attend 3 grammar/reading and writing classes per week and attend a further tutorial focusing on oral and aural Gaelic skills (4 hours of class tuition in total). Students are also requested to pursue private study and to submit regular written work.

The oral element also includes a programme of directed study being undertaken by students in the language laboratory.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour examination (60%); Continuous written assessment (20%); Continuous oral/aural assessment (20%).

Resit: 1 two-hour examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

4 formative assessments on different aspects of written Gaelic language, including 3 homework exercises and 1 in-class test. These four pieces of work will form the basis of the 20% continuous assessment.

The oral assessment (20%) will be based on performance in all classes and completion of certain assignments throughout the course.

The above assessments are given CAS marks and written feedback. General verbal feedback is given in class. Additional written and/or verbal feedback is given on an individual basis as required.

GH 1008
GAELIC LANGUAGE 1A
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Michelle Macleod

Pre-requisite(s): Higher Gaelic (Learners) at Grade B or above, or equivalent.

Note(s): This course may NOT be included as part of a graduating curriculum with GH 1001, GH 1007, GH 1008 or GH 1009.

The course will develop receptive and productive language skills through weekly classes which will focus respectively on written language, grammar and oral language.

1 one-hour written language class; 1 one-hour grammar class; 1 one-hour oral class per week.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment (30%) (3 language exercises), oral examination (20%) and examination (50%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (66%) and 1 oral examination (34%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

6 formative assessments of different aspects of written Gaelic language.

The above assessments are given CAS marks, and written or verbal feedback is also given. Additional informal feedback on performance is also given in both written language classes and oral classes.

GH 1009
GAELIC FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS  1A
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Michelle Macleod

Pre-requisite(s): Higher Gàidhlig (Native Speakers) at Grade B or above, or equivalent.

Note(s): This course may NOT be included as part of a graduating curriculum with GH 1007 or GH 1008.

The course will develop receptive and productive language skills through weekly classes which will focus respectively on written language, grammar and oral language.

1 one-hour written language class; 1 one-hour grammar class; 1 Gaelic studies seminar per week.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment (30%) (3 language exercises), essay (20%) and examination (50%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

6 formative assessments of different aspects of written Gaelic language.

The above assessments are given CAS marks, and written or verbal feedback is also given. Additional informal feedback on performance is also given in both written language classes and oral  classes.

GH 1010
GAELIC READING FOR BEGINNERS 1A
CREDIT POINTS 7.5

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Marsaili MacLeod

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): GH 1007. This course can only be taken by students also studying Gaelic for Beginners Course 1A (GH 1007). It is aimed primarily at those students who intend to carry on with Gaelic to degree level is not compulsory for students taking Gaelic as part of a sustained study programme.

The course will develop understanding, fluency and the ability to use the language correctly through the study of a range of written materials including authentic texts. It will encourage written and oral reflection using basic Gaelic sentence structures.

1 one-hour class per week.

1st Attempt: Continuous Assessment (50%); Review of a set text (50%).

Resit: Reviews of two set texts (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

3 formative assignments based on 3 different set texts (40%).
Tutorial Assessment (10%).
Both of these form the basis of the 50% continuous assessment.

All of the above assessments will be given a CAS mark together with written and verbal feedback.

GH 1011
MODERN GAELIC SCOTLAND A
CREDIT POINTS 7.5

Course Co-ordinator: Mrs C McGonigle

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): All texts are delivered in English or with translation.

Introduction to the decline and development of the Gaelic language, The concept of 'Inferiorisation', Gaelic Education 1975-2010, Gaelic Broadcasting, Gaelic Publishing, Introduction to Gaelic Poetry 1950-2010. Students will be expected to contribute substantially to seminar discussions.

1 one-hour lecture  per week for 6 weeks, followed by 1 one-hour seminar for 6 weeks.

1st Attempt: One essay on your seminar topic (50%); Seminar preparation (30%) ; Seminar participation (20%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

The above assessments are given CAS marks, and written or verbal feedback is also given. Additional informal feedback on performance and tutorial participation is also given in tutorials.

GH 1507
GAELIC FOR BEGINNERS 1B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Marsaili MacLeod

Pre-requisite(s): GH 1007: Gaelic for Beginners 1A

Co-requisite(s): All students are strongly advised to take GH 1510 Gaelic Reading for Beginners 1B.

Note(s): This course may not be taken by students who qualify for Gaelic Language 1B or any other more advanced courses.

The course will concentrate on the acquisition of essential grammar and vocabulary and will build on previous knowledge to further develop ability across all four linguistic skills.

Students attend 3 grammar/reading and writing classes per week and attend a further tutorial on oral and aural Gaelic skills (4 hours of class tuition in total). Students are also required to pursue private study and to submit regular work.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour examination (60%); Continuous written assessment (20%); Continuous oral assessment (20%).

Resit: 1 two-hour examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

4 formative assessments on different aspects of written Gaelic language, including 3 home-work exercises and 1 in-class test. These four pieces of work will form the basis of the 20% continuous assessment.

The oral assessment (20%) will be based on performance in all classes and an oral skills test.

The above assessments are given CAS marks and written feedback. General verbal feedback is given in class. Additional written and/or verbal feedback is given on an individual basis as required.

GH 1508
GAELIC LANGUAGE 1B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Michelle Macleod

Pre-requisite(s): GH 1008

Note(s): This course may NOT be included as part of a graduating curriculum with GH 1507 or GH 1509.

The course will develop receptive and productive language skills through weekly classes which will focus respectively on written language, grammar and oral language.

1 one-hour written language class; 1 one-hour grammar class; 1 one-hour oral class per week.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment (3 language exercises) (30%), oral examination (20%) and examination (50%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (66%) and 1 oral examination (34%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

6 formative assessments of different aspects of written Gaelic language.

The above assessments are given CAS marks, and written or verbal feedback is also given. Additional informal feedback on performance is also given in both written language classes and oral  classes.

GH 1509
GAELIC FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS 1B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Michelle Macleod

Pre-requisite(s): GH 1009

Note(s): This course may NOT be included as part of a graduating curriculum with GH 1507 or GH 1508.

The course will develop receptive and productive language skills through weekly classes which will focus respectively on written language, grammar and 1 Gaelic studies seminar per week.

1 one-hour written language class; 1 one-hour grammar class; 1 one-hour oral class per week.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment (30%) (3 language exercises), essay (20%) and examination (50%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (66%) and 1 oral examination (34%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

6 formative assessments of different aspects of written Gaelic language.

The above assessments are given CAS marks, and written or verbal feedback is also given. Additional informal feedback on performance is also given in both written language classes and oral  classes.

GH 1510
GAELIC READING FOR BEGINNERS 1B
CREDIT POINTS 7.5

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Marsaili MacLeod

Pre-requisite(s): GH 1007 Gaelic for Beginners 1A.

Co-requisite(s): This course can only be taken by students also studying Gaelic for Beginners Course 1B (GH 1507). It is aimed primarily at those students who intend to carry on with Gaelic to degree level and is not compulsory for students taking Gaelic as part of a sustained study programme.

The course will develop understanding, fluency and command of language structures through the study of a range of written materials including authentic texts. It will also encourage discussion of materials using basic Gaelic.

1 one-hour class per week.

1st Attempt: Continuous Assessment (50%). A short presentation in Gaelic on a text of their own choice (50%).

Resit: A short presentation in Gaelic on a text of their own choice (50%). One written assignment based on a set text (50%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

3 formative assignments based on 3 different set texts (40%).
Tutorial Assessment (10%).
Both of these form the basis of the continuous assessment (50%).

All of the above assessments will be given a CAS mark together with written and verbal feedback.

GH 1511
MODERN GAELIC SCOTLAND B
CREDIT POINTS 7.5

Course Co-ordinator: Mrs C McGonigle

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): The course aims to develop students awareness: Twentieth-century Gaelic culture and society through a study of  a selection of poetry and socio-political documents, organised around the broad themes of ‘Language Death' and 'Language Renaissance'.

Note(s): All texts are delivered in English or with translation.

Twentieth-century Scottish Gaelic culture and society through a study of 'The Role of Women in Gaelic Society', 'The Role of Religion in Gaelic', 'Society From Disparagement to Devolution' and 'Gaelic Poetry 1950-2010'.

1 one-hour lecture  per week for 6 weeks, followed by 1 one-hour seminar for 6 weeks.

1st Attempt: One essay on your seminar topic (50%); Seminar preparation (30%) ; Seminar participation (20%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

The above assessments are given CAS marks, and written or verbal feedback is also given. Additional informal feedback on performance and tutorial participation is also given in tutorials.

 

> Level 2
GH 2006
GAELIC FOLKLORE
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Mrs C McGonigle

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): All texts are delivered in English or with translation.

The course will consist of two one hour classes per week. Students will be introduced to key concepts in lectures, while a revision tutorial will be used to consolidate information, to check understanding and to analyse specific texts in greater detail. The course will focus on a variety of aspects of folklore and folklore studies, such as: collectors and collecting, rites of passage and practices, Gaelic songs, custom and belief as well as the practical elements of ethnological study. The emphasis in this course is to encourage students to do independent research and give a presentation on the topic as part of their continuous assessment.

2 one-hour classes per week, including a mixture of lectures, tutorials and student-led seminars.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (60%); 1 Essay (2,000 words) (15%); Presentation (15%); Tutorial Assessment Mark (10%).

Resit: Examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment of tutorial and seminar participation.

The above assessments are given CAS marks, and written or verbal feedback is also given. Additional informal feedback on performance and tutorial participation is also given in tutorials.

GH 2007
GAELIC LANGUAGE 2A
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: TBC

Pre-requisite(s): GH 1508.

Note(s): Not to be included in the same graduating curriculum as GH 2008 or GH 2005.

Each week, students will take one hour of formal language work, one hour of language extension work and one hour in an oral/aural class. The formal language work will be designed to increase students' confidence in using higher register language and will help students to improve their knowledge and understanding of accurate models of morphological and syntactic structures. The extension work will typically include reading texts, translation and writing about a wide range of topics in preparation for Honours study. The oral/aural class will involve natural conversation, discussion, debate, role play, monologue, presentations, etc., in addition to listening to tape-and-text materials, transcription and other exercises designed to improve students' understanding of authentic language.

3 one-hour language classes per week.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment (3 language exercises) (30%), oral examination (20%) and examination (50%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (70%) and an oral examination (30%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

3 formative assessments of different aspects of written Gaelic language; 3 formative assessments of Gaelic grammar; and 1 formative assessment each of oral/aural Gaelic language language.

The above assessments are given CAS marks, and written or verbal feedback is also given. Additional informal feedback on performance is also given in written language classes; oral classes; and grammar classes.

GH 2008
GAELIC LANGUAGE FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS 2A
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: TBC

Pre-requisite(s): GH 1509.

Each week, students will take one hour of formal language work and hour of language extension work. The formal language work will be designed to increase students' confidence in using higher-register language and will help students to improve their knowledge and understanding of accurate models of morphological and syntactic structures. The extension work will typically include reading texts, translation and writing about a wide range of topics in preparation for Honours study. Students will be required to submit regular and extensive written formative assignments in addition to their assessed work.

There are two classes per week: a formal language class and a language extension class. There is also a programme of directed self-study, designed to prepare students' for the more independent Gaelic language work at Honours level.

1st Attempt: Examination (50%); in-course assessment (3 language exercises) (30%); essay (20%).

Resit: Written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

3 formative assessments of different aspects of written Gaelic language; 3 formative assessments of Gaelic grammar; and 1 formative assessment each of oral / aural Gaelic language.

The above assessments are given CAS marks, and written or verbal feedback is also given. Additional informal feedback on performance is also given in written language classes; oral classes; and grammar classes.

GH 2009
GAELIC FOR ADVANCED BEGINNERS 2A
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Watson

Pre-requisite(s): GH 1007 and GH 1507.

The course will concentrate on the grammatical structure of the language building on, consolidating and developing previous knowledge. One class session per week will concentrate on the acquisition of new structures and concepts. A second session will consolidate these through written and oral exercises. The third session will be an oral class which aims to develop confidence in speaking the language and introduces the students to a variety of Gaelic registers. Students will be expected to prepare work for submission on a regular basis.

2 one-hour classes per week of morphological syntactic and lexical study per week , including translation.
1 one-hour class of remedial language work
1 one-hour oral class with native speaker incorporating formative exercises.

1st Attempt: Continuous Assessment (20%); Oral Assessment (20%); Two-hour written examination (60%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (80%) and an oral examination (20%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

4 formative assessments on different aspects of written Gaelic. These four pieces of work will form the basis of the 20% continuous assessment.

The above assessments are given CAS marks and written feedback. General verbal feedback is given in class. Additional written and/or verbal feedback is given on an individual basis as required.

GH 2506
19TH CENTURY GAELIC LITERATURE AND SOCIETY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Ms C McGonigle

Pre-requisite(s): GH 2005 Gaelic for Advanced Beginners 2A or GH 2007 Gaelic Language 2A or GH 2008 Gaelic Language for Native Speakers 2B

Note(s): All texts are delivered in English or with translation.

The class will meet twice a week for one hour. One class will be in the form of a lecture on the specified topic and the other class will be a seminar which focuses on discussion of relevant reading. Some of the topics to be studies include: a historical overview of 19th century; evidence form literature - 19th century Gaelic prose; issues affecting population changes; urban Gaels; emigration; poetry; innovation; Gaelic education; land issues; publishing; evangelicalism.

1 one-hour lecture per week and 1 one-hour tutorial.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (60%); 1 Essay (2,000 words) (30%); Tutorial Assessment Mark (10%).

Resit: Examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

There is formative assessment of tutorial participation.

The above assessments are given CAS marks, and written or verbal feedback is also given. Additional informal feedback on performance and tutorial participation is also given in tutorials.

GH 2507
GAELIC LANGUAGE 2B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: TBC

Pre-requisite(s): GH 2007 Gaelic Language 2A.

Note(s): Not to be included in the same graduating curriculum as GH 2508 or GH 2505.

This course builds on the work of GH 2007 Gaelic Language 2A. Each week, students will take one hour of formal language work, one hour of language extension work and one hour in an aural/oral class. The formal language work will be designed to increase students' confidence in using higher-register language and will help students to improve their knowledge and understanding of accurate models of morphological and syntactic structures. The extension work will typically include reading texts, translation and writing about a wide range of topics in preparation for Honours study. The oral/aural class will involve natural conversation, discussion, debate, role play, monologue, presentations, etc. in addition to listening to tape-and-text materials, transcription and other exercises designed to improve students' understanding of authentic language.

3 one-hour language classes per week.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment (3 language exercises) (30%), oral examination (20%) and examination (50%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (70%) and an oral examination (30%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

3 formative assessments of different aspects of written Gaelic language; 3 formative assessments of Gaelic grammar; and 1 formative assessment each of oral/aural Gaelic language language.

The above assessments are given CAS marks, and written or verbal feedback is also given. Additional informal feedback on performance is also given in written language classes; oral classes; and grammar classes.

GH 2508
GAELIC LANGUAGE FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS 2B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: TBC

Pre-requisite(s): GH 2008.

Note(s): This course is not to be included in a graduating curriculum alongside GH 2505 or GH 2507.

Each week, students will take one hour of formal language work and hour of language extension work. The formal language work will be designed to increase students' confidence in using higher-register language and will help students to improve their knowledge and understanding of accurate models of morphological and syntactic structures. The extension work will typically include reading texts, translation and writing about a wide range of topics in preparation for Honours study. Students will be required to submit regular and extensive written formative assignments in addition to their assessed work.

There are 2 one-hour classes per week: a formal language class and a language extension class.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment (30%) (3 language exercises), essay (20%) and examination (50%).

Resit: Examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

3 formative assessments of different aspects of written Gaelic language; 3 formative assessments of Gaelic grammar; and 1 formative assessment each of oral/aural Gaelic language language.

The above assessments are given CAS marks, and written or verbal feedback is also given. Additional informal feedback on performance is also given in written language classes; oral classes; and grammar classes.

GH 2509
GAELIC FOR ADVANCED BEGINNERS 2B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Watson

Pre-requisite(s): GH 2005.

The course will place special emphasis on the grammatical structure of the language by extending and developing grammatical knowledge previously acquired. Grammar sessions will concentrate on the acquisition of new structures and concepts with an opportunity being given to consolidate grammar learnt through translation and comprehension exercises. Confidence in speaking the language will also be developed through a variety of approaches and materials.

2 one-hour classes per week concentrating on the acquisition of new new grammatical structures and concepts.
1 one-hour class consolidating grammar and vocabulary through translation and language comprehension exercises.
1 one-hour class developing confidence in oral and aural skills.

Students will also be expected to undertake private study in the Language Centre as part of their oral/aural programme of studies.

1st Attempt: Continuous Assessment (20%); Oral Assessment (20%); Two-hour written examination (60%).

Resit: The Resit assessment will consist of a two-hour written examination (70%) and an oral examination (30%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

4 formative assessments on different aspects of written Gaelic. These four pieces of work will form the basis of the continuous assessment(20%).

The above assessments are given CAS marks and written feedback. General verbal feedback is given in class. Additional written and/or verbal feedback is given on an individual basis as required.

 

> Level 3
GH 3002
LEVEL 3 GAELIC LANGUAGE 2
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Michelle Macleod

Pre-requisite(s): Level 2 Gaelic language courses for non-Native Speakers.

Note(s): This course is not available for students with Native Speaker Higher; they are required to take Advanced Writing for Gaelic Native Speakers. This course is for students who are not completing an Honours degree in Gaelic Studies.

2 one-hour classes per week and 1 one-hour of directed study in the language lab. One class will focus on oral communicative skills, and the other will develop competencies in the written language in a variety of different registers. Students will be required to complete regular assignments, to study independently and to study tapes and videos in the language centre.

2 one-hour classes and 1 one-hour of directed study in the language lab per week.

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (100%): two oral exercises (40%); composition (20%); two language exercises (40%).

Resit: 1 three-hour written examination and one oral examination.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment is based on a folio of written work and a profile of oral class work.

Students are given feedback in written form on a weekly basis, on work submitted in class. Feedback is also offered verbally to individuals and to the whole class in all classes.

GH 3003
ADVANCED GAELIC WRITING FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS - LEVEL 3A
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Watson

Pre-requisite(s): Level 2 Gaelic courses for Native Speakers or equivalent.

Co-requisite(s): Gaelic Translation: Theory and Practice for Gaelic Studies Single Honours.

Note(s): Only available for students with Native Speaker Higher or equivalent.

This course builds on Gaelic language classes at Level 1 and Level 2 and complements other language options available at Levels 3 and 4. The course runs all year. Students will attend 1 one-hour seminar per fortnight. This seminar will provide vocabulary for specific linguistic domains, set writing tasks and discuss students' performance in their writing tasks. Students will be required to undertake a directed programme of writing tasks and submit exercises on a fortnightly basis.

This is a course for native speakers, who are all learning at individual rates and who all have distinctive needs and weaknesses in their language. The needs and knowledge of each individual student is addressed by the lecturer, and the course is tailored individually.

1 one-hour seminar per fortnight.

1st Attempt: Level 3: Continuous assessment (100%); four 1,000 word exercises.
Resit: 1 three-hour examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Assessment is both formative and summative simultaneously, as it is drawn from a folio of work.

The course is based around the concept of using feedback as the main teaching tool. Students submit work which is closely marked by the teacher. Classes take the form of supervision sessions in which marked work is closely examined by student and teacher.

GH 3007
GAELIC TRANSLATION: THEORY AND PRACTICE A and B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Watson

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 who have passed Gaelic language courses at Level 2.

Available only to students in Programme Year 4 who have passed Gaelic language courses at Level 3.

Co-requisite(s): Level 3 Gaelic Language or Advanced Gaelic Writing Skills for Native Speakers A.

Level 4 Gaelic Language or Advanced Gaelic Writing Skills for Native Speakers B.

This course studies concepts and principles of translation and translation studies. The course also provides students with an opportunity to improve their Gaelic in an applied language setting, with an emphasis on transferable, professional skills. Assignments will consist of reading in the field of translatology and carrying out practical translation work. Students will be taught different strategies for dealing with different styles of source- and target-language materials and will be given the opportunity to develop their translating skills on a range of literary, professional, technical, academic and other texts.

Level 4 adds: Students will be expected to be able to deal with the most difficult texts at Level 4.

1 one-hour per week.

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment: four translations and one exercise (20% each).

Level 3 only:
1 two-hour written examination, consisting of two translations and one exercise (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students develop a folio of written work, which is formatively assessed each week. Some of this then forms part of a folio for summative assessment.

Written feedback is given on weekly assignments. Verbal feedback takes place within class or in email or other contact with students.

GH 3016
ADVANCED GAELIC GRAMMAR
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Michelle Macleod

Pre-requisite(s): Level 2 Gaelic language courses or equivalent.

This one-hour seminar will consolidate and develop aspects of Gaelic grammar previously taught and will introduce new advanced concepts. Students will be expected to complete weekly language assignments - either in writing or in the language laboratory. The course will develop accuracy in grammar both in writing and in oral production.

1 one-hour seminar per week for 24 weeks plus guided self-study.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour examination (60%) and continuous assessment (4 language exercises) (40%).

Resit: 1 two-hour examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Weekly assignments are set, both within the class and as self-study. These are used formatively to allow students to build up an understanding of how to address their existing weaknesses in the language.

Students are given feedback weekly in the form of written corrections to submitted work and advice delivered verbally in class, both to individuals and to the whole class.

GH 3017 / GH 3517
17TH AND 18TH CENTURY GAELIC POETRY IN ITS CONTEXT A AND B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Michelle Macleod

Pre-requisite(s): Level 2 Gaelic language courses or equivalent.

Note(s): This course may not be included as part of a graduating curriculum with its counterpart in the other half of Honours.

This course may be available in 2012/13 and in alternate sessions thereafter.

Students will be introduced to the key historical and social developments of Gaelic society in the 17th and 18th centuries and will read poetry which gives a greater insight into understanding of Gaelic perspectives on and motives in such developments. Topics which will be covered include: clan politics; national and international politics (with emphasis on the wars of the Covenanting period, the Jacobite rebellions and British Imperial wars to the Napoleonic period); religion; the development of a Gaelic identity; Culloden and its aftermath; poetic conservatism and innovation, both stylistic and in terms of subject matter (for example, bardic poetry, satire, nature and love poetry, metrical and linguistic developments).

Two hours of seminars per week.

1st Attempt: Level 3; Two written exercises (10% each), one essay 2,000 words (60%); seminar mark (20%)
1st Attempt: Level 4; Two written exercises (10% each), one essay 2,500 words (60%); seminar mark (20%)

Resit: Level 3 only; 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students are given regular formative tasks to complete. Feedback on these forms a core of the teaching in the course.

Feedback is communicated verbally each week and in writing on students' work. All students are invited to discuss any feedback which needs clarification.

GH 3018 / GH 3518
TRADITIONALISM AND MODERNISM: GAELIC POETRY 1900-1950 A and B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Watson

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students who have passed Gaelic language courses at Level 2.

Note(s): This course may not be included as part of a graduating curriculum with GH 4018 / GH4518

This course studies an important transitional point in the development of modern Gaelic literature, covering the work of both the traditional 'village poets' who predominated in the early part of the 20th century and also the emerging masters of the modernist idiom such as Sorley Maclean and George Campbell Hay. The course will involve reading, discussion, analysis and groupwork activities based on the Gaelic poetry of the period. Directed self-study will involve substantial amounts of reading, both in the poetry itself and in related fields such as the literatures of other languages, history, biography, social commentary, critical practice and critical theory.

Two hours of seminars per week.

1st Attempt: Two written exercises of around 600 words each (15% each), one essay of 2,000 words for Level 3 or 2,500 words for Level 4 students (60%); seminar mark (10%).

Resit: Level 3 only: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

The continuous assessment element of the course is intended to provide students with a formative experience and the exercises are designed specifically around the notion of preparing students to tackle the essay.

Written and verbal feedback is provided in response to the written tasks. Verbal feedback is provided each week based on students' performance within seminars. A final written summation of seminar effectiveness is provided at the end of the course.

GH 3019 / GH 3519
MODERN IRISH LANGUAGE A and B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Michelle Macleod

Pre-requisite(s): Level 3: Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above or by permission of the Head of School.

Note(s): Not available to students who have A Level Irish / or Leaving Cert. Irish.

Level 3:
Students will study modern Irish grammar, acquire a basic vocabulary and become comfortable with the main pronunciation differences between Scottish Gaelic and Irish. The course will be comparative in nature and students will have an accelerated learning experience because of the cognate nature of the languages.

Classes will include reading comprehension, grammar exercises and translation.

Two hours of classes per week.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Resit: Level 3 only:
1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment takes the form of written or oral tasks set in class each week.

Feedback is written on submitted work and provided verbally in class.

GH 3020/GH 4020
LEVEL 3 GAELIC LANGUAGE 1 & LEVEL 4 GAELIC LANGUAGE 1 (2 separate modules)
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Macleod

Pre-requisite(s): Level 2 Gaelic language courses - not for students who have taken Native Speaker options.

Co-requisite(s): Gaelic Translation: Theory and Practice, for Single Honours Students.

Note(s): This course is designed for honours students.

Not available for students with Native Speaker Higher; they are required to take Advanced Writing for Gaelic Native Speakers.

2 one-hour classes per week and 1 one-hour of directed study in the language lab. One class will focus on oral communicative skills, and the other will develop competencies in the written language in a variety of different registers. Students will be required to complete regular assignments, to study independently and to study tapes and videos in the language centre. The Junior and Senior Honours language courses form a continuum for which the final assessment is not made until the end of the Senior Honours year.

2 one-hour classes and 1 one-hour of directed study in the language lab per week.

1st Attempt: 2 two-hour written exams (70%); 1 thirty-minute oral exam (30%).

Note that students are assessed only at the end of the Level 4 course.

These are core courses for Gaelic Studies. Any student failing this suite of courses is no longer eligible for Honours in Gaelic Studies. On failing the final exit examination, a student may register to resit the non-Honours course GH 3002.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students are assessed formatively throughout both Level 3 and Level 4 Gaelic. This assessment is based on a folio of written work and a profile of oral class performance.

Students are given feedback weekly in the form of written corrections to submitted work and advice delivered verbally in class, both to individuals and to the whole class.

GH 3059 / GH 3559
EARLY MODERN GAELIC LANGUAGE AND TEXTS A
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Watson

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students who have passed Level 2 Gaelic language courses.

Note(s): The course may not be included as part of a graduating curriculum in the other half of honours.

The course will be based on the study of short authentic historical documents and fictional texts produced in the language in the period c1200-c1700. It will involve morphological, syntactic and lexical study, with an emphasis on translation into English or modern Gaelic, and consideration of the socio-historical and literary background needed to reach a full appreciation of the texts. Directed self-learning will include preparation of translations for discussion and analysis in class and substantial reading on historical and cultural topics related to the texts and their authors.

Two hours of seminars per week.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment: 2 language exercises (40% each), and seminar assessment (20%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students are formatively assessed based on weekly assignments which are generally delivered orally in class.

Direct feedback is given verbally to students to help them improve their understanding of the language and its context. Written feedback is provided on submitted tests.

GH 3060 / GH 3560
GAELIC IDENTITIES A
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Marsaili MacLeod

Pre-requisite(s): Level 2 Gaelic language courses or equivalent would be strongly advised before taking this course.

Note(s): The course may not be included as part of a graduating curriculum with its counterpart in the other half of Honours.

This course will develop your understanding of how our use of language reflects our social identities. It investigates the concept of identity and the work it does at individual and group levels in the Gaelic speech community. It foregrounds how the construction of identity is connected to language use at different spatial scales, micro and macro-societal. The course draws on a range of literary, statistical and ethnographic sources in order to illustrate the issues under investigation and it gives you practical knowledge and experience of data synthesis and analysis through weekly workshops.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 two-hour workshop per week.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%) and in-course assessment: individual project (40%) and oral presentation (10%).

Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students are assessed formatively on their seminar performance and also on their progress towards their individual project.

Verbal feedback is given to students in class and written feedback is provided on students' submitted work.

GH 3062 / GH 3562
THE GAELIC SHORT STORY A
CREDIT POINTS

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Watson

Pre-requisite(s): Level 2 Gaelic language courses or equivalent.

Note(s): This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with its counterpart in the other half of Honours.

This course studies the development of shorter prose fiction in Gaelic in the twentieth (and twenty-first) century. It will investigate the importance of the short story and consider its place within the wider Gaelic culture. It will involve reading, analysing and discussing several of the most important Gaelic short stories of the period. Students will also be engaged in directed self-study outside of class, which will involve substantial amounts of additional reading in fields such as the literature of other languages, history, biography, social commentary, philosophy, critical practice and critical theory.

Two hours of seminars per week.

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (100%); essay (Level 3 - 2,000 words (70%), presentation (20%) and seminar mark (10%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination, two essays, (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students are assessed formatively by means of an ongoing seminar assessment. There is no formal formative assessment of written work in this course, although students do submit seminar papers each week, and verbal feedback is given on these.

Feedback is delivered verbally in class, both to the whole group and to individuals. Summative assessments - the essay and the presentation - receive detailed written comments, which are returned to the students. Students are invited to discuss all comments if required.

GH 3064 / GH 3564
THE GAELIC NOVEL A AND B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Watson

Pre-requisite(s): Level 2 Gaelic language courses or equivalent.

Note(s): This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with its counterpart in the other half of Honours.

Level 3: The course will involve two hours per week of reading, analysing and discussing several of the most important Gaelic novels of the twentieth (and twenty-first) century.

1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: Level 3: Two written exercises (10% each); one 2,000 word essay (70%); seminar mark (10%).

Resit: Level 3 only:
1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment is based on students' performance in class. Students also prepare seminar papers each week, which are discussed during classes.

Students are given constructive feedback during classes. Feedback is also written onto their assessed exercises and handed back to them.

GH 3065 / GH 3565
POWER AND PREJUDICE: GAELIC IN SCOTTISH A AND B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Marsaili MacLeod

Pre-requisite(s): The course is available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above or by permission of the Head of School.

Note(s): This course will not be available in 2012/13. This course may not be included as part of a graduating curriculum with its counterpart in the other half of Honours.

This course introduces the concept of bilingualism and language conflict in the context of the Gaelic speech-community. It focuses on the types of conflicts which occur around Gaelic. We identify the principles upon which they can be understood and investigated, and we examine efforts at historical and contemporary solutions at a national, as well as supra-national, level. We will pay particular attention to how Scotland as a nation has planned for Gaelic bilingualism through different institutional contexts. These include education, media, the arts and public affairs.

1 two-hour lecture per week.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment; one essay (80%); student-selected presentation (20%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment is carried out weekly in class, based on students' preparation for seminars.

Feedback is given on the basis of students' seminar performance. Written feedback is given for essays submitted.

GH 3067/ GH 3567
THE GAELIC POETRY RENAISSANCE A AND B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Michelle Macleod

Pre-requisite(s): Level 2 Gaelic language courses or equivalent.

Note(s): This course may not be included as part of a graduating curriculum with its counterpart in the other half of Honours.

This course may be available in 2013/14 and in altnernate sessions thereafter.

The course will involve one two-hour seminar per week of reading, analysing and discussing set texts. Students will be engaged in directed self-study out of the class which will involve substantial amounts of additional reading, such as: further poetry, literary criticism, social commentary etc.

1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (100%): essay (Level 3 - 2,000 words; Level 4 - 2,500 words) (70%), presentation (20%), and seminar assessment (10%).

Resit: Level 3 only: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Assignments are set each week and students are given feedback on their performance in these assignments. These guide students in their preparation for the continuous assessment elements.

Feedback is communicated verbally each week and in writing when summative assessments have been submitted. Feedback is always directed, and students are always invited to discuss written feedback.

GH 3092 / GH 3592
COMPARATIVE MINORITY LANGUAGE PLANNING A AND B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Marsaili MacLeod

Pre-requisite(s): Only available to students in Programme Year 3 or above or by permission of the Head of School.

This course is designed to give students a grounding in the theory and implementation of language policy and planning in the insular Celtic language polities and jurisdictions. The course focuses on the application of knowledge to contemporary language situations through empirical study of Irish, Welsh, Gaelic, Cornish and Manx in their national contexts. It aims to provide students with the tools to engage in research on language planning and policy and to apply this knowledge in practice. It foregrounds the importance of the notion of 'linguistic human rights' in relation to language policy and planning.


Level 4 students are expected to carry out a much broader range of reading and to do more self-directed learning and to be able to bring this to bear on their arguments both in class and in written work. They are expected to be able to synthesise their knowledge and experience from earlier Honours courses (which they can necessarily only have if they have already done Level 3) with the new material.

1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (100%): student presentation (20%), seminar participation (10%) and essay (70%).
Version A (Level 3) Essay 2,500-3,000 words. Version B (Level 4) Essay 3,000-3,500 words.


Resit: Level 3 only: 1 two-hour examination.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students are given formative assessment each week in class.

Feedback is given verbally in class to give students an indication of their progress. Written feedback is generated for both the presentation and the essay.

GH 3520 / GH 4520
POWER AND PREJUDICE: GAELIC IN SCOTTISH SOCIETY A AND B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M MacLeod

Pre-requisite(s): The course is available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above or by permission of the Head of School.

Note(s): This course will not be available in 2012/13. This course may not be included as part of a graduating curriculum with its counterpart in the other half of Honours.

This course introduces the concept of bilingualism and language conflict in the context of the Gaelic speech-community. It focuses on the types of conflicts which occur around Gaelic. We identify the principles upon which they can be understood and investigated, and we examine efforts at historical and contemporary solutions at a national, as well as supra-national, level. We will pay particular attention to how Scotland as a nation has planned for Gaelic bilingualism through different institutional contexts. These include education, media, the arts and public affairs.

1 two-hour lecture per week.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment; one essay (80%); student-selected presentation (20%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment is carried out weekly in class, based on students' preparation for seminars.

Feedback is given on the basis of students' seminar performance. Written feedback is given for essays submitted.

 

> Level 4

PLEASE NOTE: Resit: (for Honours students only): Candidates achieving a CAS mark of 6-8 may be awarded compensatory level 1 credit. Candidates achieving a CAS mark of less than 6 will be required to submit themselves for re-assessment and should contact the Course Co-ordinator for further details.

GH 4001
LEVEL 4 GAELIC LANGUAGE 1
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Michelle Macleod

Pre-requisite(s): Level 3 Gaelic Language.

Co-requisite(s): Gaelic Translation: Theory and Practice B - for Gaelic Studies Single Honours.

Note(s): This course is for Gaelic/Celtic Honours students. Not available for students with Native Speaker Higher; they are required to take Advanced Writing for Gaelic Native Speakers B.

The course will build on Gaelic Language 3, and develop competencies to a very high level. There will be 2 one-hour classes per week. One class will focus on advanced oral communicative skills; another will develop competence in the written language in a variety of different registers. Students will be required to complete regular assignments (report-writing, descriptive writing etc), study independently and to study tapes and videos in the language centre. The Junior and Senior Honours language courses form a continuum for which the final assessment is not made until the end of the Senior Honours year.

2 one-hour classes and one hour of directed study in the language lab per week.

1st Attempt: Gaelic Honours Language Examinations (100%).

GH 4002
LEVEL 4 GAELIC LANGUAGE 2
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Michelle Macleod

Pre-requisite(s): Level 3 Gaelic Language.

Note(s): This course is not available for students with Native Speaker Higher; they are required to take Advanced Writing for Gaelic Native Speakers B.

The course will build on Gaelic Language 3, and develop competences to a very high level. There will be two one-hour classes each week. One class will focus on advanced oral communicative skills; another will develop competence in the written language in a variety of different registers. Students will be required to complete regular assignments (report-writing, descriptive writing etc), study independently and to study tapes and videos in the language centre.

2 one-hour classes and one hour of directed study in the language lab per week.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment (100%): two oral exercises (40%); composition (20%), and two language exercises (40%).

GH 4003
ADVANCED GAELIC WRITING FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS - LEVEL 4B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Watson

Pre-requisite(s): Level 2 Gaelic courses for Native Speakers or equivalent.

Co-requisite(s): Gaelic Translation: Theory and Practice for Gaelic Studies Single Honours.

Note(s): Only available for students with Native Speaker Higher or equivalent.

This course builds on Gaelic language classes at Level 1 and Level 2 and complements other language options available at Levels 3 and 4. The course runs all year. Students will attend 1 one-hour seminar per fortnight. This seminar will provide vocabulary for specific linguistic domains, set writing tasks and discuss students' performance in their writing tasks. Students will be required to undertake a directed programme of writing tasks and submit exercises on a fortnightly basis.
This is a course for native speakers, who are all learning at individual rates and who all have distinctive needs and weaknesses in their language. The needs and knowledge of each individual student is addressed by the lecturer, and the course is tailored individually.

1 one-hour seminar per fortnight.

1st attempt: Level 4: Continuous assessment (100%); four 1,200 word essays.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Assessment is both formative and summative simultaneously, as it is drawn from a folio of work.

The course is based around the concept of using feedback as the main teaching tool. Students submit work which is closely marked by the teacher. Classes take the form of supervision sessions in which marked work is closely examined by student and teacher.

GH 4006
GAELIC DIALECTOLOGY B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Michelle Macleod

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 who have passed GH 2505, GH 2507 or GH 2508.

Note(s): This course will be available in 2013/14 and in alternate sessions thereafter. This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with GH 3006 Gaelic Dialectology A.

This course will examine a wide range of modern and historical Gaelic dialects. Students will be introduced to the principles of dialect distribution and variation, and they will examine features of vocabulary, pronunciation and grammar. Students will become familiar with the phonetic symbols used for transcribing Gaelic, and practice will be given in making phonetic transcripts. The course will also consider social attitudes to dialects and the historical development and attrition of Gaelic dialects. Students will make independent use of a sound archive of modern Gaelic dialects and of phonetic transcripts of historic dialects.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 one-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment: essay (60%), and language exercise (40%).

GH 4007
GAELIC TRANSLATION: THEORY AND PRACTICE B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Watson

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 who have passed Gaelic language courses GH 2502, GH 2503, GH 2505, GH 2507 or GH 2508.

This course studies concepts and principles of translation and translation studies. The course also provides students with an opportunity to improve their Gaelic in an applied language setting, with an emphasis on transferable, professional skills at a high level of accuracy. Assignments will consist of extensive reading in the field of translatology and carrying out more challenging practical translation work. Students will be taught different strategies for dealing with different styles of source- and target-language materials and will be given the opportunity to develop their translating skills on a range of literary, professional, technical, academic and other texts. Students will be expected to be able to deal with the most difficult texts at Level 4.

1 hour per week.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment: four translations and one exercise (20% each).

GH 4011
GAELIC SENIOR HONOURS SEMINAR
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Watson & Dr Michelle Macleod

Pre-requisite(s): GH 3001 or GH 3003.

Co-requisite(s): Gaelic Studies Senior Honours Language Courses.

Note(s): This course is run over the full session, and is available only to Senior Honours students. This course is not available to students taking GH4016

The course aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop their own research and presentation skills and their oral eloquence and persuasiveness in the Gaelic language, as well as broaden their awareness of the spectrum of topics available for study in Gaelic as an academic discipline. The course will also develop transferable skills which will be equally useful for the workplace (whether in a Gaelic-speaking environment or not) and for further training or postgraduate research. During the course of seminars, students will be expected to present a substantial paper on material that they have researched themselves and then organise and deal with the subsequent discussion of the topic. The seminar series is expected to relate to the other Level 4 courses in Gaelic Studies and to be relevant to students' development in Level 4 language courses.

1 two-hour seminar per fortnight, and supervisions with individual students in the preparation of their research papers.

1st Attempt: This course is examined as part of the Gaelic Honours Language Examinations.

GH 4016
SENIOR HONOURS SEMINAR FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Ms C McGonigle

Pre-requisite(s): Advanced Gaelic Writing Skills for Native Speakers A.

Co-requisite(s): Advanced Gaelic Writing Skills for Native Speakers B.

Note(s): Not available in the same graduating curriculum as Senior Honours Seminar (for non-Native Speakers). This course is run over the full session, with one formal meeting per fortnight, and is available only to Senior Honours students

The class will meet once per fortnight for a two-hour seminar, during which students will be expected to present a long paper on material they have researched themselves and then organise and deal with the subsequent discussion of the topic. The seminar is expected to relate to the other Level 4 courses in Gaelic Studies and to be relevant to students' development in Level 4 language courses.

1 two-hour seminar once a fortnight

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (60%) and one oral presentation (40%)

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students are given the opportunity to work on their research and their presentation throughout the year. Each person has several opportunities to practise in front of their peers, with feedback coming from both the lecturer and the other students.

Feedback is delivered verbally throughout the course; this course is highly practical, with a coaching-based teaching approach.

GH 4017 / GH 4517
17TH AND 18TH CENTURY GAELIC POETRY IN ITS CONTEXT
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Michelle Macleod

Pre-requisite(s): Level 2 Gaelic Language Courses or equivalent

Note(s): This course may not be included as part of a graduating curriculum with its counterpart in the other half of Honours. This course may be available in 2012/13 and in alternate sessions thereafter.

Students will be introduced to the key historical and social developments of Gaelic society in the 17th and 18th centuries and will read poetry which gives a greater insight into understanding of Gaelic perspectives on and motives in such developments. Topics which will be covered include: clan politics; national and international politics (with emphasis on the wars of the Covenanting period, the Jacobite rebellions and British Imperial wars to the Napoleonic period); religion; the development of Gaelic identity; Culloden and its aftermath; poetic conservatism and innovation, both stylistic and in terms of subject matter (for example, bardic poetry, satire, nature and love poetry, metrical and linguistic developments).

Two hours of seminars per week.

1st Attempt: Level 3; Two written exercises (10% each), one essay 2,000 words (60%); seminar mark (20%)
1st Attempt: Level 4; Two written exercises (10% each), one essay 2,500 words (60%); seminar mark (20%)

Resit: Level 3 only; 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students are given regular formative tasks to complete. Feedback on these forms a core of the teaching in the course.

Feedback is communicated verbally each week and in writing on students' work. All students are invited to discuss any feedback which needs clarification.

GH 4018 / GH 4518
TRADITIONALISM AND MODERNISM: GAELIC POETRY 1900-1950 A and B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Watson

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students who have passed Gaelic language courses at Level 2.

Note(s): This course may not be included as part of a graduating curriculum with GH 3018 / GH 3518

This course studies an important transitional point in the development of modern Gaelic literature, covering the work of both the traditional 'village poets' who predominated in the early part of the 20th century and also the emerging masters of the modernist idiom such as Sorley Maclean and George Campbell Hay. The course will involve reading, discussion, analysis and groupwork activities based on the Gaelic poetry of the period. Directed self-study will involve substantial amounts of reading, both in the poetry itself and in related fields such as the literatures of other languages, history, biography, social commentary, critical practice and critical theory.

Two hours of seminars per week.

1st Attempt: Two written exercises of around 600 words each (15% each), one essay of 2,000 words for Level 3 or 2,500 words for Level 4 students (60%); seminar mark (10%).


Resit: Level 3 only: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

The continuous assessment element of the course is intended to provide students with a formative experience and the exercises are designed specifically around the notion of preparing students to tackle the essay.

Written and verbal feedback is provided in response to the written tasks. Verbal feedback is provided each week based on students' performance within seminars. A final written summation of seminar effectiveness is provided at the end of the course.

GH 4019 / GH 4519
MODERN IRISH LANGUAGE A and B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Michelle MacLeod

Pre-requisite(s): Level 4: Available only to students in programme year 4 or by permission of the Head of School.

Note(s): Not available to students who have A Level Irish / or Leaving Cert. Irish.

Level 4:
Students will study modern Irish grammar, acquire a basic-intermediate vocabulary and become comfortable with the main pronunciation differences between Scottish Gaelic and Irish. The course will be comparative in nature and students will have an accelerated learning experience because of the cognate nature of the languages.


Classes will include reading comprehension, grammar exercises and translation.

Two hours of classes per week.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).




Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative assessment takes the form of written or oral tasks set in class each week.

Feedback is written on submitted work and provided verbally in class.

GH 4059 / GH 4559
EARLY MODERN GAELIC LANGUAGE AND TEXTS B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Watson

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students who have passed Level 2 Gaelic language courses.

Note(s): The course may not be included as part of a graduating curriculum with its counterpart course at Level [INSERT 3 OR 4 HERE AS APPROPRIATE]

The course will be based on the study of short authentic historical documents and fictional texts produced in the language in the period c1200-c1700. It will involve morphological, syntactic and lexical study, with an emphasis on translation into English or modern Gaelic, and consideration of the socio-historical and literary background needed to reach a full appreciation of the texts. Directed self-learning will include preparation of translations for discussion and analysis in class and substantial reading on historical and cultural topics related to the texts and their authors.

Two hours of seminars per week.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment: 2 language exercises (40% each), and seminar assessment (20%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students are formatively assessed based on weekly assignments which are generally delivered orally in class.

Direct feedback is given verbally to students to help them improve their understanding of the language and its context. Written feedback is provided on submitted tests.

GH 4060 / GH 4560
GAELIC IDENTITIES A AND B
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M MacLeod

Pre-requisite(s): Level 2 Gaelic language courses or equivalent would be strongly advised before taking this course.

Note(s): The course may not be included as part of a graduating curriculum with its counterpart in the other half of Honours.

Students are expected to carry out a much broader range of reading and to do more self-directed learning and to be able to bring this to bear on their arguments both in class and in written work. They are expected to be able to synthesise their knowledge and experience from earlier Honours courses (which they can necessarily only have if they have already done Level 3) with the new material.

1 one-hour lecture and 1 two-hour workshop per week.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%) and in-course assessment: individual project (40%) and oral presentation (10%).

Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students are assessed formatively on their seminar performance and also on their progress towards their individual project.

Verbal feedback is given to students in class and written feedback is provided on students' submitted work.

GH 4062 / GH 4562
THE GAELIC SHORT STORY B
CREDIT POINTS

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Watson

Pre-requisite(s): Level 2 Gaelic language courses or equivalent.

Note(s): This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with its counterpart in the other half of Honours.

This course studies the development of shorter prose fiction in Gaelic in the twentieth (and twenty-first) century. It will investigate the importance of the short story and consider its place within the wider Gaelic culture. It will involve reading, analysing and discussing several of the most important Gaelic short stories of the period. Students will also be engaged in directed self-study outside of class, which will involve substantial amounts of additional reading in fields such as the literature of other languages, history, biography, social commentary, philosophy, critical practice and critical theory. Students will extend their understanding of the subject by exploring additional texts (both in Gaelic and in other languages they know) not covered on the syllabus by means of independent research, setting the topics treated in their wider context and synthesizing material from a range of sources.

Two hours of seminars per week.

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (100%); essay (2,500 words) (70%), presentation (20%) and seminar mark (10%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students are assessed formatively by means of an ongoing seminar assessment. There is no formal formative assessment of written work in this course, although students do submit seminar papers each week, and verbal feedback is given on these.

Feedback is delivered verbally in class, both to the whole group and to individuals. Summative assessments - the essay and the presentation - receive detailed written comments, which are returned to the students. Students are invited to discuss all comments if required.

GH 4064 / GH 4564
THE GAELIC NOVEL A AND B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Watson

Pre-requisite(s): Level 2 Gaelic language courses or equivalent.

Note(s): This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with its counterpart in the other half of Honours.

Level 4: The course will involve two hours per week of reading, analysing and discussing several of the most important Gaelic novels of the twentieth (and twenty-first) century. Students will also be engaged in directed self-study outside of class, which will involve substantial amounts of additional reading in fields such as the literature of other languages, history, biography, social commentary, philosophy, critical practice and critical theory.

1 two-hour seminar per week.

Level 4: Two written exercises (10% each); one 2,500 word essay (70%); seminar mark (10%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information


Formative assessment is based on students' performance in class. Students also prepare seminar papers each week, which are discussed during classes.

Students are given constructive feedback during classes. Feedback is also written onto their assessed exercises and handed back to them.

GH 4065 / GH 4565
POWER AND PREJUDICE: GAELIC IN SCOTTISH SOCIETY A AND B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Marsaili MacLeod

Pre-requisite(s): The course is available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above or by permission of the Head of School.

Note(s): This course will not be available in 2012/13. This course may not be included as part of a graduating curriculum with its counterpart in the other half of Honours.

This course introduces the concept of bilingualism and language conflict in the context of the Gaelic speech-community. It focuses on the types of conflicts which occur around Gaelic. We identify the principles upon which they can be understood and investigated, and we examine efforts at historical and contemporary solutions at a national, as well as supra-national, level. We will pay particular attention to how Scotland as a nation has planned for Gaelic bilingualism through different institutional contexts. These include education, media, the arts and public affairs.

1 two-hour lecture per week.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment; one essay (80%); student-selected presentation (20%).




Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information


Formative assessment is carried out weekly in class, based on students' preparation for seminars.

Feedback is given on the basis of students' seminar performance. Written feedback is given for essays submitted.

GH 4067 / GH 4567
THE GAELIC POETRY RENAISSANCE A AND B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Michelle MacLeod

Pre-requisite(s): Level 2 Gaelic language courses or equivalent.

Note(s): This course may not be included as part of a graduating curriculum with its counterpart in the other half of Honours. This course may be available in 2013/14 and in altnernate sessions thereafter.

The course will involve one two-hour seminar per week of reading, analysing and discussing set texts. Students will be engaged in directed self-study out of the class which will involve substantial amounts of additional reading, such as: further poetry, literary criticism, social commentary etc.

1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (100%): essay (Level 3 - 2,000 words; Level 4 - 2,500 words) (70%), presentation (20%), and seminar assessment (10%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Assignments are set each week and students are given feedback on their performance in these assignments. These guide students in their preparation for the continuous assessment elements.

Feedback is communicated verbally each week and in writing when summative assessments have been submitted. Feedback is always directed, and students are always invited to discuss written feedback.

GH 4092 / GH 4592
COMPARATIVE MINORITY LANGUAGE PLANNING A AND B
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Marsaili MacLeod

Pre-requisite(s): Only available to students in Programme Year 3 or above or by permission of the Head of School.

This course is designed to give students a grounding in the theory and implementation of language policy and planning in the insular Celtic language polities and jurisdictions. The course focuses on the application of knowledge to contemporary language situations through empirical study of Irish, Welsh, Gaelic, Cornish and Manx in their national contexts. It aims to provide students with the tools to engage in research on language planning and policy and to apply this knowledge in practice. It foregrounds the importance of the notion of 'linguistic human rights' in relation to language policy and planning.


Level 4 students are expected to carry out a much broader range of reading and to do more self-directed learning and to be able to bring this to bear on their arguments both in class and in written work. They are expected to be able to synthesise their knowledge and experience from earlier Honours courses (which they can necessarily only have if they have already done Level 3) with the new material.

1 two-hour seminar per week.

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (100%): student presentation (20%), seminar participation (10%) and essay (70%).
Version A (Level 3) Essay 2,500-3,000 words. Version B (Level 4) Essay 3,000-3,500 words.


Resit: Level 3 only: 1 two-hour examination.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students are given formative assessment each week in class.

Feedback is given verbally in class to give students an indication of their progress. Written feedback is generated for both the presentation and the essay.

GH 4507
DISSERTATION IN GAELIC STUDIES
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Watson

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to Senior Honours Gaelic Studies students.

Approximately 3 one-hour tutorials (arranged by the student) which will provide students with guidance on selecting a suitable academic topic and developing a methodology for tackling chosen topic.

Approximately 3 one-hour tutorials.

1st Attempt: Dissertation 7000-8000 words (100%)

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Formative feedback takes place in the discussions between the dissertation supervisor and the student

Feedback is provided in writing after the dissertation is completed. During the course, students interact with a member of staff on a supervisory basis.