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GEOGRAPHY

> Level 1
GG 1007
GLOBAL WORLDS, GLOBAL CHALLENGES
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr N Spedding

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): This course may not be included in a graduating curriculum with GG 1005, GG 1006 or GC 1001.

Related study blocks will address:

  • How the planet works. The interdependence of natural and human systems: interaction of atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, lithosphere, world cultures, economic and political systems.

  • Global environmental change. Atmosphere and oceans. The relationships between land cover and land use, population, and development. Political, economic and ethical consequences.
  • Resources, development and environmental degradation. Natural resources as the foundation of prosperity and human well-being. Agricultural and industrial development, social and environmental justice.

  • Globalisation, society and lifestyles. What are the impacts of global economic and technological change? What is sustainable development and is it achievable?

2 one-hour lectures per week plus six one-hour workgroups.

1st Attempt:

  • For students who complete the coursework to a satisfactory standard: coursework, 100%.  These students will obtain exemption from the degree exam, and their coursework mark will provide the overall course CAS mark.

  • For students who do not obtain exemption from the degree exam: coursework, 50% plus exam, 50%.
  •  

    Resit: original coursework carried forward, 50%, plus exam, 50%.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    The course includes a workgroup exercise on assessment of essays.  Students must sit a mock exam in-class.  However, with just 12 weeks, 6 workgroups and a degree exam exemption system that requires summative assessment of coursework, it is difficult to arrange stand-alone formative assessment.  It makes more sense to consider feedback/feedforward in terms of onwards progression: e.g., students write just  one coursework essay which is summatively assessed, but comments provided on this should help students to improve their performance next time: e.g., in the follow-up second half-session course.

    Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard  comments sheets. For the practical, we also provide whole-class feedback via MyAberdeen.  This past year, we also put model answers/mark schemes for all coursework and the mock exams on MyAberdeen to give students the chance to self-assess their own performance.

    GG 1509
    GLOBAL WORLDS, LOCAL CHALLENGES
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr J.E Schofield

    Pre-requisite(s): None

    Co-requisite(s): None

    Note(s): This course may not be included in a graduating curriculum with GG 1506, GG 1507 or GC 1501.

    This course examines how geographical patterns and processes are reflected at a varitey of spatial scales (from global to local). Related study blocks will address:

    • Environmental change and landscape response;-topography ice and climate, (the cryosphere), and the factors affecting the contemporary distributions of plants, animals and soils (biogeography).

    • Globalisation and the challenges to sustainable transport;- regional development and the post-industrial economy of Scotland.

    • New social and cultural spaces;- mobility and difference; poverty and exclusion; imaginative geographies and unequal power relationships; memories, places and nations.

    2 1-hour lectures per week + 6 1-hour workgroups.

    1st Attempt:

    • For students who complete the coursework to a satisfactory standard: coursework, 100%.  These students will obtain exemption from the degree exam, and their coursework mark will provide the overall course CAS mark.

    • For students who do not obtain exemption from the degree exam: coursework, 50% plus exam, 50%.
     
    Resit: Original coursework carried forward, 50%, plus exam, 50%.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    The course includes a practical assignment, a group poster/presentation, and an essay.  Students must also sit a mock exam/class test (or similar).  However, with just 12 weeks, 6 workgroups and a degree exam exemption system that requires summative assessment of coursework, it is difficult to arrange stand-alone formative assessment.  It makes more sense to consider feedback/feedforward in terms of onwards progression: e.g. students write a coursework essay which is summatively assessed, but comments provided on this should help students to improve their performance next time: e.g. in the follow-up Level 2 courses.

    Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets.

     

    > Level 2
    GG 2010
    PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTS
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr D Mair

    Pre-requisite(s): GG 1007 or GG 1509

    The course focuses on understanding physical environmental processes and change. In particular three broad themes of hydrology, glaciology and palaeoecology will be explored to illustrate the linkages and interactions between process and form over a range of temporal and spatial scales. The three themes are team-taught by staff with a strong emphasis on using examples from their own research projects.

    20 lectures (2 per week). Online practicals TBA

    1st Attempt: For students who complete the two coursework exercises to a satisfactory standard: coursework (100%) these students will obtain exemption from the degree exam, and their coursework mark will provide the overall course CAS mark. For students who do not obtain exemption from the degree exam: coursework (50%) plus exam (50%).

    Resit: Original coursework carried forward (50%), plus exam (50%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    There is no stand-alone, formal formative assessment. However, feedback on summative assessments should help students to improve their subsequent performances within the course and for follow-up second half-session courses. See box below.

    Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets. We also provide whole-class feedback via MyAberdeen. This includes the main points of answers/tutors' mark schemes to encourage students to review where they gained and lost marks.

    GG 2011
    PERSPECTIVES IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr D Watts

    Pre-requisite(s): GG 1007 or GG 1509.

    This course examines political, economic, social and cultural change from a spatial perspective, using a range of concepts and case studies. Although intended to provide a foundation for higher level study of human geography, it is designed to be accessible to students of cognate disciplines such as anthropology, economics, history, international relations and sociology. Topics to be addressed include, for example:
    globalisation; political geography; uneven development; rural change in Western Europe; relationships between place and identity. The course is team-taught, often using examples drawn from our own fields of research.

    The course is delivered through 2 one-hour lectures per week (22 hours in total). There are also two drop-in surgery sessions for informal discussion of any issues that students have concerning the coursework assignments (up to 4 hours in total).

    For students who complete the two coursework assignments to a satisfactory standard: coursework (100%). These students will obtain exemption from the degree exam and their coursework mark will provide the overall course CAS mark.

    For students who do not obtain exemption from the degree exam: coursework (50%) plus exam (50%).

    Original coursework carried forward (50%), plus exam (50%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework assignments using standard comments sheets. This feedback should help students to improve their subsequent performance within the course and on following courses. There is not stand-alone, formal formative assessment for this course.

    GG 2508
    SKILLS AND TECHNIQUES IN GEOSCIENCES
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Beecroft

    Pre-requisite(s): Only available to students in Programme Year 2 registered for one of Geography and Environments degree programmes, or at least three from GG 2010, GG 2011, GG 2509 and GG 2510. Students who do not meet these criteria may be admitted to the course at the discretion of the course coordinator.

    Note(s): This course involves an Easter field trip. Students are advised not to make arrangements for the vacation until details of the trips are confirmed. Please note the field course involves a student financial contribution.

    The course introduces key research skills for the geosciences, both scientific and social scientific, and includes both lecture and practical components. Students will learn how to conduct investigations in their chosen field of study effectively and safely. Topics considered include concepts underpinning geosciences research, and basic methods of data gathering, analysis and presentation (such as questionnaire design, keeping of a field notebook, basic field skills, some statistical training, report writing). The core element of the course is a residential fieldtrip in the Easter vacation. This enables students to employ the skills and techniques learned in lectures and workgroup sessions to conduct original research into phenomena/issues covered elsewhere in the suite of Level 1 and 2 courses in Geography & Environment.

    Lectures to introduce principles of research design, key techniques of data collection and analysis, supported by workgroup sessions for field trip preparation, plus the field trip itself.

    1st Attempt: Coursework (100%): pre-trip presentation (20%), end-of-trip presentation (20%), 2,500 word report written up as a short research paper (60%).

    Resit: Apply to course coordinator. In exceptional circumstances, students may be permitted to resubmit the field trip report.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Students work in groups, supported by staff, to prepare their field trip projects. Students are expected to keep a diary/notebook that records the progress of their project. Pre-trip and end-of-trip presentations provide opportunities for formative feedback that can be used to improve students performance at the next task/stage of assessment. See box below.

    Feedback (verbal and/or written) on students pre-trip presentation before the field trip provides opportunities to adjust the proposed research design. Feedback (verbal and/or written) on students end-of-trip presentation provides opportunities to adjust the processing and write-up of data. Students receive individual written feedback on their project report. We also provide a group debrief that identifies strengths and weaknesses and looks ahead to the additional demands of Level 3 study.

    GG 2509
    ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr T Mighall

    Pre-requisite(s): GG 1007 or GG 1509 or relevant Sixth Century Course. Other students with an interest in current environmental issues may be admitted at the discretion of the course coordinator.

    Co-requisite(s): None

    Study of the relationship between people and their environment is perhaps the most durable of geography's core traditions. The spatial diversity of the natural environment, the distribution of resources, and the associated opportunities or constraints for socio-economic development dominated much of the work done in the first few decades of the discipline's existence as a recognised school and university subject. In the second half of the twentieth century, as the negative impact of human activities on the environment became increasingly obvious, other disciplines - such as the natural sciences, economics, sociology and politics - also started to think of the environment as part of their territory. The rise of the environment as a pervasive, but often ill-defined or disputed, 'real world' issue was matched by the proliferation of ideas about how best to study it, drawn from all parts of the academic spectrum. This course provides a survey of some of the most important of these current environmental issues (e.g., biodiversity, climate change, natural hazards, organic foods, sustainable transport, water resources), examined from various conceptual perspectives (e.g., earth systems science, political ecology, risk and vulnerability, social construction of nature). Although the diversity of environmental debates and the different perspectives that sustain and/or explain these provides the core theme of the course, coursework will give students the opportunity to focus on topics of particular interest.

    Two 1-one sessions per week, to include both lectures and practical briefings. Two 2-hour surgery sessions to support coursework. Further support from MyAberdeen.

    1st Attempt: 100% coursework. Two data-response exercises + mini-project (format + topic to be chosen in discussion with students).

    Resit: Apply to course coordinator. In exceptional circumstances, students may be permitted to resubmit coursework.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    There is no stand-alone, formal formative assessment. However, feedback on summative assessments should help students to improve their subsequent performances within the course and for follow-up second half-session courses. See box below.

    Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets. We also provide whole-class feedback via MyAberdeen. This includes the main points of answers/tutors? mark schemes to encourage students to review where they gained and lost marks.

    GG 2510
    MAPPING AND MONITORING THE ENVIRONMENT
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Spagnolo

    Pre-requisite(s): Only available to students in Programme Year 2.

    The course covers: map reading and map creation; measurement, recording and manipulation of ground-surveyed and remotely-sensed data; data acquisition via a Global Positioning System; analysis of aerial photograph and satellite images; approaches to environmental monitoring based on multi-temporal images; the storage, manipulation and timely provision of geographical information; methods of analysing and presenting the results through Geographical Information Systems. The theoretical basis of both Geographical Information Systems and Remote Sensing techniques will form the foundations of the course, with reference to case studies at a range of scales (from local to global) both in lectures and practical work.

    2 one-hour lectures per week (14 hours in total) plus surgery sessions to support practical work (6 hours).

    1st Attempt: For students who complete the two coursework exercises to a satisfactory standard: coursework (100%). These students will obtain exemption from the degree exam, and their coursework mark will provide the overall course CAS mark. For students who do not obtain exemption from the degree exam: coursework (50%) plus exam (50%).

    Resit: Original coursework carried forward (50%), plus exam (50%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments. There is no stand-alone, formal formative assessment. However, feedback on summative assessments should help students to improve their subsequent performances within the course and for subsequent courses. See box below.

    Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets. We also provide whole-class feedback via MyAberdeen. This includes the main points of answers/tutors mark schemes to encourage students to review where they gained and lost marks.

     

    > Level 3
    GG 3025
    COASTAL AND ESTUARINE ENVIRONMENTS
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr D R Green

    Pre-requisite(s): GG 2010. Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

    • Pure and applied coastal geomorphology, reading materials and the project.

    • The basic factors of coastal geomorphology, terrestrial, marine and biological.

    • Low energy coastal environments.

    • Wadden and salt marshes & their biology, food web and management strategies.

    • High energy coastal environments. Shore platforms, the processes in play, rates of change and their ageing.

    • Sea level change, the driving mechanisms including isostasy, eustasy, hydro-isostasy and the forebulge effect.

    • Holocene sea level changes, the landform and sedimentological evidence.

    • Deltas, including delta switching, hurricane frequency, and the effects of delta switching on beach sediment supply.

    • Medium energy coastal environments, sand and shingle beaches.

    • The causes of beach erosion.

    • Short term sea level change and its effects on rates and directions of coastal evolution.

    • Barrier island coasts and barrier inlets. Coral coasts.

    • Coastal sand dunes, their origins, form, evolution, dune history and management.

    • Machair and its land use, prehistory and history.

    • Estuaries.

    • Coastal management, policies and planning.

    • Coastal protection, sea walls, groynes, beach nourishment, beach dewatering and nearshore structures.

    • Environmental Impact Assessment of proposed developments on the coast.
    • 10 x 2 hour lecture/discussion classes (weekly).

      1st Attempt: A two-hour examination involving answering two questions from a choice of six (67% of the assessment).
      A term paper which involves the production of a written paper with appropriate referencing on a topic appropriate to the course. A selection of possible topics, together with starter journal references, will be provided (25% of the assessment). A mid-term quiz (8% of the assessment).


      Resit: One 2-hour written examination (67%) plus original coursework carried forward (33%).

      Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

      There is no stand-alone formative assessment; mid-term quiz allows for feedback.

      Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets.

      GG 3028
      TRANSPORT GEOGRAPHY
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Anable

      Pre-requisite(s): GG 2011 and/or GG 2509. This course is available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

      • Introducing transport geography.

      • Transport trends.

      • Transport policy in Scotland, England and Europe.

      • Transport and the environment. Travel behaviour change.

      • Rural transport and accessibility.

      • Plus project mock inquiry.

      Lectures/ workshops: 22 hours in total (1 x two-hour lectures/ workshops each week).

      1st Attempt: Coursework: 33% plus 2-hour exam: 67%.

      Resit: Original coursework carried forward: 33% plus 2-hour exam: 67%.

      Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

      There is no stand alone formative assessment. Coursework incorporates peer assessment.

      Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets.

      GG 3031
      APPROACHES TO GEOGRAPHY
      CREDIT POINTS 30

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr N Spedding

      Pre-requisite(s): Available only to candidates in Programme Year 3 who have passed GG 2508 and at least three from GG 2010, GG 2011, GG 2509, GG 2510.

      Note(s): This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with GG 3052 or GG 3063.

      The course is designed to introduce students to key debates, both past and present, on the nature and scope of academic geography. As such, it provides essential background for study of geography at an advanced level, irrespective of any intended specialisation. Wherever possible, parallels are drawn between the physical, environmental and human branches of the subject, although the reality (or otherwise) of geography as a single, coherent discipline is also put under scrutiny. Students are encouraged to take a critical stance towards the various claims made for and against the different types of geography, and the notion of geography as a 'contested enterprise' forms a major theme of the course.

      1 two-hour lecture per week plus 1 two-hour skills session and 4 two-hour seminars.

      1st Attempt: One two-hour examination: (50%) and coursework (50%), made up of one seminar presentation plus written exercises (e.g., an essay and a report).

      Resit: original coursework carried forward (50%) plus one 2-hour written examination (50%). Under exceptional circumstances, resubmission of failed coursework components, with mark for those components to be capped at CAS 9.

      Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

      There is no stand-alone, formal formative assessment. However, the course includes a dedicated introductory session on reading, writing and talking Honours geography and a group tutorial to support the first written assignment. Feedback on summative assessments should help students to improve their subsequent performances within the course and for follow-up second half-session courses. See box below.

      Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets. We also provide whole-class feedback via MyAberdeen. This includes the main points of answers/tutors' mark schemes to encourage students to review where they gained and lost marks.

      GG 3041
      PLANNING METHODS AND ENVIRONMENTAL APPRAISAL
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Ms G Wall

      Pre-requisite(s): LE 2031 or permission of course coordinator

      • Environmental assessment.

      • Environmental impact assessment and strategic environmental assessment.
      • Theory, methods, critically evaluating practice from local to global. Global comparative approach to case studies examples.

      • Populations and land requirements forecasting, data sources - theory, methods, practice from Scotland.

      • Transportation planning; theory, methods, critically evaluating practice.

      • Retailing - theory, methods, critically evaluating practice. Lectures.

      • Greenspace planning - theory, methods, critically evaluating practice from local to global.

      • Settlement capacity and sustainable development - theory, methods, critically evaluating practice from Scotland.

      • Plan making in practice; exploring and evaluating planning balance sheets, cost benefit analysis, multi-criteria evaluation, goals achievement matrices, scenario building.

      • Each 2 hour lecture includes around 10 minutes of specific guided group problem-solving tasks and feedback discussions.

        One 2-hour lecture / workshop per week; further support from MyAberdeen.

        1st Attempt: 1 x 2000 word essay (33%). 1 x 2 hour exam consisting of two questions. (67%).


        Resit: 1 x 2 hour exam + original coursework carried forward.

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        Feedback on the summative assessment will help students improve their subsequent performance.

        Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets. We also provide feedback via MyAberdeen.

        GG 3052
        APPROACHES TO EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr N Spedding

        Pre-requisite(s): GG 2010 and GG 2508. Available only to students registered for BSc joint programmes with Geography.

        Note(s): This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with GG 3031 or GG 3063.

        This course is designed to introduce students to key debates, both past and present, on the nature and scope of the earth and environmental sciences. As such it provides essential background for study of physical geography/geosciences at an advanced level. Content will include key aspects of the history of the earth and environmental sciences (e.g., the discovery of "deep time", the development of ideas about ice ages, the impact of evolutionary theory, the quantitative revolution in physical geography post-1945, the importance of digital technologies, the influence of environmentalism). We relate these to important concepts used to structure explanation in the earth sciences (e.g., uniformitarianism, historical approaches vs. process studies, systems and models). The last third of the course addresses the implications for research (e.g., the possibilities and pitfalls of different qualitative and quantitative approaches). This part of the course incorporates some practical work, including a one-day field trip.

        Flexible according to students' interests. Typically 16 hours of lectures, one 2-hour introductory skills session, 4 hours of seminars, 4 hours of practical classes + one day field trip. Teaching is spread across both half-sessions.

        1st Attempt: Coursework (67%): one seminar presentation, first half-session (33%); one research practical exercise, second half-session (33%); one 1-hour written examination in January (33%).

        Resit: Original coursework carried forward (67%) plus one 2-hour written examination (33%). Under exceptional circumstances, resubmission of failed coursework components, with mark for those components to be capped at CAS 9.

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        There is no stand-alone, formal formative assessment. However, the course includes a dedicated introductory session on reading, writing and talking Honours geography. Feedback on summative assessments should help students to improve their subsequent performances within the course and for follow-up second half-session courses. See box below.

        Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets. We also provide whole-class feedback via MyAberdeen. This includes the main points of answers/tutors' mark schemes to encourage students to review where they gained and lost marks.

        GG 3063
        APPROACHES TO GEOGRAPHY (JOINT PROGRAMMES)
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr N Spedding

        Pre-requisite(s): Available only to joint programme candidates in Programme Year 3 who have passed GG 2508 and at least three from GG 2010, GG 2011, GG 2509, GG 2510.

        Note(s): This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with GG 3031 or GG 3052.

        The course is designed to introduce students to key debates, both past and present, on the nature and scope of academic geography. As such, it provides essential background for study of geography at an advanced level, irrespective of any intended specialisation. Wherever possible, parallels are drawn between the physical, environmental and human branches of the subject, although the reality (or otherwise) of geography as a single, coherent discipline is also put under scrutiny. Students are encouraged to take a critical stance towards the various claims made for and against the different types of geography, and the notion of geography as a 'contested enterprise' forms a major theme of the course.

        1 two-hour lecture per week plus 1 two-hour skills session and 4 two-hour seminars.

        1st Attempt: Coursework (67%): one seminar presentation (33%) plus one piece of written work (33%), plus one 1-hour examination (33%).).

        Resit: Original coursework carried forward (67%) plus one 1-hour written examination (33%). Under exceptional circumstances, resubmission of failed coursework components, with mark for those components to be capped at CAS 9.

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        There is no stand-alone, formal formative assessment. However, the course includes a dedicated introductory session on reading, writing and talking Honours geography and a group tutorial to support the first written assignment. Feedback on summative assessments should help students to improve their subsequent performances within the course and for follow-up second half-session courses. See box below.

        Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets. We also provide whole-class feedback via MyAberdeen. This includes the main points of answers/tutors mark schemes to encourage students to review where they gained and lost marks.

        GG 3065
        CULTURAL IDENTITY AND PLACE CREATION
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Professor W J Neill

        Pre-requisite(s): GG 2011 (Perspectives in Human Geography).

        The course is structured as follows:

        • Part 1 will review recent theoretical writing on the role of place in the constitution of cultural identity and establish links to prior theorists in geography, economics and sociology.

        • Part 2 will be a case study of the spatiality of identity formation in the range of concrete city settings with a particular focus on urban planning and development. The tension with place marketing will receive particular attention.

        • Part 3 will explore the concepts of urban citizenship and social capital as participatory processes for the construction of plural cities accommodating a variety of cultural identities.

        One 2-hour lecture per week

        1st Attempt: One 2-hour examination (67%); coursework: essay or project (33%).

        Resit: one 2-hour examination (67%) + original coursework carried forward (33%).

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        There is no stand-alone, formal formative assessment. However, feedback on summative assessments should help students to improve their subsequent performances within the course and for follow-up courses. See box below.

        Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets.

        GG 3068
        DATA ANALYSIS
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr D. Mauquoy

        Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 who have passed GG 2508.

        Co-requisite(s): None

        • Topic 1: Introduction: sampling design, data types, descriptive statistics, use of data tables and charts, parametric vs. non-parametric statistics.

        • Topic 2: Testing for relationships: data inspection, assumptions and transformations, linear regression, multiple linear regression, correlation.

        • Topic 3: Testing for differences: 2 samples (t-test, Mann-Whitney and Kolmogorov-Smirnov); more than 2 samples (ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, and multiple range tests).

        • Topic 4: Multivariate statistics: linear vs. unimodal ordination techniques; PCA and DCA; RDA and CCA.

        • Topic 5: Design and analysis of social surveys.

        • Topic 6: Synthesis: key do's and don'ts, presenting statistics, use of statistics in published work.

        One-two hour lecture/practical per week.

        1st Attempt: 100% coursework. Students complete 3 assignments: one related to topic 1 (20%), one related to topics 2 and 3 (40%) and one related either to topics 4 or 5 (40%).

        Resit: Resubmission of failed project work, with mark for those components to be capped at CAS 9.

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        There is no stand-alone, formal formative assessment. However, feedback on summative assessments should help students to improve their subsequent performances within the course.

        Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comment sheets. We also provide whole-class feedback in class meetings and via MyAberdeen, covering generic issues and running through model answers.

        GG 3069
        REMOTE SENSING AND GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr R Bingham

        Pre-requisite(s): GG 2510

        The course focuses on practical training in the use of remote sensing and GIS software and techniques to examine, analyse and present geographical issues. Emphasis is placed on giving students technical experience through project-based learning, with all sessions based in the computer lab and working with software such as ArcGIS and ERDAS Imagine. Project management and graphical presentation of results and analysis will also form a strong theme of the course. Students will be offered a range of projects to work on, which will reflect directly contemporary research being undertaken across the discipline of Geography and Environment. Staff in all areas of G&E will provide projects; computer practicals and support will be undertaken by GIS experts based in G&E.

        Ten 2-hour practical sessions based in a computing laboratory.

        1st Attempt: Coursework (100%): two project exercises.

        Resit: Resubmission of failed project work, with mark for those components to be capped at CAS9.

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        Surgeries will be integrated into the course.

        Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets.

        GG 3070
        STRATEGIC SPATIAL PLANNING
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Professor M Aspinall

        Pre-requisite(s): LE 2031

        Co-requisite(s): GG 3041

        • Introduction to pre-selected geographical area as focus for study (e.g., Westhill).

        • Undertake survey using primary data (such as interviews with local residents, community councillors) and secondary data sources (such as interrogation of census data).

        • Analysis of data collected.

        • Generation of alternative possible development scenarios.

        • Selection and generation of preferred development strategy.

        • Identification of relevant indicators and assessment techniques for monitoring the successful implementation of the strategy over lifetime of development plan.

        One 2 hour lecture per week.
        One site visit.
        Further support from MyAberdeen.
        Workshops as requested by students.

        1st Attempt: 67% coursework and 33% exam.

        Resit: 100% exam

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        There is no stand-alone formative assessment for this course.

        Students receive individual written feedback on their individual essay and group project work. Feedback (oral and written) is given on summative assessment at the end of the session.

        GG 3556
        LIQUID GEOGRAPHY: THE GEOGRAPHY OF VINE AND WINE
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr D R Green

        Pre-requisite(s): At least one of GG 2010, GG 2011, GG 2509 or GG 2510 or permission of course coordinator. This course is available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

        This course will provide an introduction to the Geography of the Vine and Wine. It will include an examination of the historical aspects of geography and wine and the influence of climate and climate change, geology, and soils (terroir) on wine and viticulture (grape-growing). The impact of the wine industry on the cultural, historical, and environmental landscape will also be considered. Students will develop an appreciation for the environmental constraints of vine growing together with the geographical characteristics of wines and wine regions. A study will be made of the wine industry, from vine to vineyard. This will include vineyard management to bottling, marketing and distribution. Finally, the application of remote sensing, digital mapping, GPS and GIS to vineyard management will also be studied, specifically focusing on the impact of geographical data and analysis on precision viticulture in vineyard management. Case studies will be drawn from around the world to illustrate various aspects of the module.

        10 x 2 hour lectures (weekly). GIS practical sessions will be arranged. Occasional guest speakers

        1st Attempt: Coursework: 33% plus 2-hour exam: 67%.

        Resit: Original coursework carried forward: 33% plus 2-hour exam: 67%.

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        There is no stand alone formative assessment.

        Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets.

        GG 3565
        LAND AND MARINE CONSERVATION
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Mr W Walton and Dr N Spedding

        Pre-requisite(s): At least one of GG 2011, GG 2509, LE 2031, MR 2508 or MR 2509. Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

        This course is designed for students with an interest in how best to make use of land, water and cultural resources. It examines the science, ethics, aesthetics, economics, law and politics of land and marine management at a variety of geographic levels from the international down to the local, and draws heavily upon case studies from the USA, the UK and the rest of Europe. Potential examples include the protection and management of: Antarctica; fish stocks; areas of natural beauty; historical cities; and the peri-urban fringe from the threats posed by the likes of: mineral extraction; energy schemes; airport expansion; intensive farming practices; urban sprawl and tourism/leisure proposals.

        The course will be taught through a mixture of lectures, discussions and seminars, supported by self directed learning.

        1st Attempt: 1 x 2,000 word essay (33%); 1 x project report on a relevant topic of your choice (2000 words per student) (33%); a data response based written examination (33%).

        Resit: Original coursework carried forward (67%) plus examination (33%).

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets.

        GG 3569
        TECHNIQUES IN PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr B R Rea

        Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 who have passed GG 2010 and GG 2508 and at least one from GG 2509 and GG 2510.

        Co-requisite(s): None.

        Note(s): Field trips may form part of the course.

        The course will deliver training in techniques related to our specific strengths in physical geography and will develop on the introduction to these provided by the 2nd year physical geography course.

        Topics/techniques will include some of the following:

        • Topographic survey.

        • Hydrology and fluvial geomorphology.

        • Glaciology.

        • Ecology.

        • Palaeoecology.

        • Modelling.

        Case studies (e.g. blue skies research papers and applied reports) will be used to introduce the techniques; some will be hands-on in the lab or in the field with others being solely theory based. It will provide a research-led introduction to techniques required at Honours and advanced level study and in the workplace beyond.

        The course will be delivered through a mixture of lectures and practical/lab exercises - 12 x 2 hrs in total. This will be supplemented with self-directed learning and, where applicable, there will be field-based teaching excursions.

        1st Attempt: Essay/report to demonstrate techniques knowledge (33.3%).
        Examination to demonstrate analysis, presentation and interpretation of data (33.3%).
        Critical review of a research project (33.3%).

        Resit: Resubmission of failed coursework components, with mark for those components to be capped at CAS 9; resit of exam.

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        There is no stand-alone, formal formative assessment. However, feedback on summative assessments will help students to improve their subsequent performances within the course and for follow-up second half-session courses.

        Students will receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using our standard comments sheets.

        GG 3570
        CONCEPTS IN HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: TBC

        Pre-requisite(s): GG 2011 (Perspectives in Human Geography) and GG 3031 or GG 3063 (Approaches to Geography).

        This course examines economic, cultural, social, political and environmental change from a spatial perspective, using a selection of key geographical concepts and related case studies. The concepts to be addressed include, for example: space, place (region or landscape), power, nature/culture hybridity, mobility, difference/diversity and identity, and uneven development/globalisation. The various themes are team-taught by staff, often using examples drawn from their own fields of research in areas such as transport, agri-food/rural change and political ecology.

        Ten 2-hour weekly sessions (i.e. 20 in total, with four hours spent on each concept): Five 2-hour lectures to introduce concepts to be followed by five seminar-style sessions to investigate application of concepts to particular topics, for which students will be expected to prepare work.

        1st Attempt: Three pieces of assessment (each 33%): one long essay, a portfolio of short pieces based on prescribed reading for seminars, and one 1-hour exam.

        Resit: Resubmission of failed coursework components, with mark for those components to be capped at CAS 9; resit of exam.

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        There is no stand-alone, formal formative assessment. However, feedback on summative assessments should help students to improve their subsequent performances within the course and for follow-up courses. See box below.

        Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets. We also provide whole-class feedback via MyAberdeen. This includes the main points of answers/tutors mark schemes to encourage students to review where they gained and lost marks.

        GG 3571
        RESEARCH DESIGN
        CREDIT POINTS 30

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr L Philip and Dr N Spedding

        Pre-requisite(s): Available only to candidates in Programme Year 3 registered for one of G&E's Honours programmes.

        Note(s): This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with GG 3572 (15 credit version of the course intended for Joint Honours students).

        • The nature of the research process.

        • Considering 'what makes a good piece of research' and 'how does a particular approach to your subject influence the type of research undertaken'.

        • Aims and learning outcomes of the undergraduate dissertation.

        • Selecting research topics and developing research questions. Literature searches and how to write a literature review.

        • Sources of quantitative and qualitative secondary data.

        • Data collection methods applicable to a wide range of geographical research questions.

        • Strategies for interpreting qualitative data.

        • Research ethics.

        • Health and safety for researchers.

        • Writing up research, how to present your dissertation and make the most of your research efforts.

        9 x two-hour lectures; 2 x 2 hour workshops; optional field day.

        1st Attempt: 100% coursework. Students complete four assignments all of which allow students to choose a topic; each counts for 25% of the overall mark:

        (i) research contexts essay; (ii) 2 x short reports: data analysis and interpretation case study;
        (iii) preliminary literature review / research planning exercise.

        Resit: Resubmission of failed project work, with mark for those components to be capped at CAS 9.

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        Feedback on summative assessments should help students to improve their subsequent performances within the course and for subsequent courses. See box below. The course incorporates the initial stages of dissertation supervision. Although summatively assessed for the purposes of this course, the preliminary literature review acts as a key component of formative assessment for the final dissertation.

        Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets. Students are also expected to liaise with their dissertation supervisor, to include two formal meetings.

        GG 3572
        RESEARCH DESIGN
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr L Philip and Dr N Spedding

        Pre-requisite(s): Available only to candidates in Programme Year 3 registered for one of G&E's Honours programmes.

        Note(s): This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with GG 3571 (30 credit version of the course intended for Single Honours students).

        • The nature of the research process.

        • Considering 'what makes a good piece of research' and 'how does a particular approach to your subject influence the type of research undertaken'.

        • Aims and learning outcomes of the undergraduate dissertation. Selecting research topics and developing research questions.

        • Literature searches and how to write a literature review.

        • Sources of quantitative and qualitative secondary data.

        • Data collection methods applicable to a wide range of geographical research questions.

        • Strategies for interpreting qualitative data.

        • Research ethics.

        • Health and safety for researchers.

        • Writing up research, how to present your dissertation and make the most of your research efforts.

        9 x two-hour lectures; 2 x 2 hour workshops; optional field day.

        1st Attempt: 100% coursework. Students choose two assignments (each worth 50%) from :

        (i) research contexts essay; (ii) a choice of short reports: data analysis and interpretation case study; (iii) preliminary literature review / research planning exercise (this being compulsory for students intending to submit their dissertation in G&E).

        Resit: Resubmission of failed project work, with mark for those components to be capped at CAS 9.

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        Feedback on summative assessments should help students to improve their subsequent performances within the course and for subsequent courses. See box below. For dissertation students, the course incorporates the initial stages of supervision. Although summatively assessed for the purposes of this course, the preliminary literature review acts as a key component of formative assessment for the final dissertation.

        Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets. Dissertation students are also expected to liaise with their supervisor, to include two formal meetings.

         

        > Level 4

        PLEASE NOTE: Resit: (for Honours students only): Candidates achieving a CAS mark of 6-8 may be awarded compensatory level 1 credit. Candidates achieving a CAS mark of less than 6 will be required to submit themselves for re-assessment and should contact the Course Co-ordinator for further details.

        GG 4016
        TRANSPORT GEOGRAPHY
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Anable

        Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in programme year 4 or above who have passed GG 2004 and/or GG 2504.

        Note(s): This course will not be available in session 2011/12.

        This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with GG 3028.

        Economic and physical characteristics of transport systems. Development of Britain’s transport systems. Transport Policy: control and deregulation. Sustainable transport. Rural and urban transport problems. Transport and environmental impacts.

        1 two-hour lectures per week plus 4 further hours of seminars or directed learning.

        1st Attempt: 1 two-hour examination (67%) and in-course assessment - project (33%).

        GG 4023
        GEOGRAPHY DISSERTATION
        CREDIT POINTS 30

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr L Philip

        Pre-requisite(s): GG 35XX or GG 35XX Research Design and Methods. Only available to students in Programme Year 4.

        Personal research on a specialist subject of the student's choice.

        There are no formal classes. The course builds on the introduction to advanced research provided by GG 35XX/GG 35XX Research Design and Methods. Students are welcome to ask members of staff for guidance at any time. Three formal supervision meetings are mandatory;other interaction should be initiated by the students.

        1st Attempt: 9,000-12,000 words dissertation (100%).

        Resit: Apply to Head of School. Only in exceptional circumstances may students be permitted to resubmit a dissertation.

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        The dissertation supervison process provides continual formative assessment.

        Students receive individual, written feedback (using standard comments sheets) on their dissertation from two members of staff who have marked the thesis independently. Marks and comments sheets are made available after the June external exam board.

        GG 4031
        COASTAL AND ESTUARINE ENVIRONMENTS
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr D.R Green

        Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in programme year 4 or above who have passed GG 2003 and/or GG 2504.

        Note(s): This course will not be available in session 2011/12. This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with GG 3025.

        The course establishes the nature of the main coastal, nearshore and estuarine processes and enables an appreciation of the characteristics and the evolution of most types of coastlines. Geomorphological knowledge is applied to a range of coastal-zone management problems, including coast protection works, nature conservation, beach and dune recreational pressures, and the establishment of sediment budgets. By the end of the course, students will have gained an understanding of the synergies of the main process factors in operation, including anthropic intervention. The main aim of the course is to increase appreciation of the physical and biological factors involved in the rational management of coastal environments. Students will achieve an awareness of the journal literature pertinent to the subject matter, and an appreciation of current gaps in our knowledge. By the end of the course they should be able to generate ideas for research strategies that could help to fill them.

        2 one-hour lectures/seminars per week plus 4 further hours of seminars or directed learning.

        1st Attempt: 1 two-hour examination (67%) and in-course assessment - project (33%).

        GG 4037
        RIVER ECOSYSTEMS AND MANAGEMENT
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr C N Gibbins

        Pre-requisite(s): This course is available only to students in programme year 4 who have passed GG 2003.

        Note(s): This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with GG 3037. This course will not be available in 2011/12.

        The course is structured as follows:

        Part I. Basic principles: (i) Disturbance, continuum and hierarchical theory, (ii) The physical habitat template of rivers, (iii) River ecosystem diversity and function.

        Part II. Human impacts: (i) River regulation, (ii) Pollution, (iii) Landuse change, (iv) Climate change.

        Part III. River restoration and management: (i) Development of enviromental flows, (ii) River restoration.

        Part IV. Field day: The ecological basis for management in the River Dee catchment. This will include a workshop to consider management issues and options for sustainable catchment management in the Dee.

        The course will close with a summary and synthesis lecture. This will illustrate how concepts, themes and approaches covered in individual lectures for part of current EU river management policy and legislation.

        10 two-hour lectures (one per week for the first 10 weeks of the course), plus a field day.

        1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examinations (67%) plus continuous assessment (33%).

        GG 4038
        DISSERTATION
        CREDIT POINTS 30

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr L Philip

        Pre-requisite(s): GG 35XX or GG 35XX Research Design (currently GG 3547 or GG 3564 or GG 3566). Only available to students in Programme Year 4.

        Personal research on a specialist subject of the student's choice.

        There are no formal classes. The course builds on the introduction to advanced research provided by GG 35XX/GG 35XX Research Design. Students are welcome to ask members of staff for guidance at any time. Three formal supervision meetings are mandatory; other interaction should be initiated by the students.

        1st Attempt: 9,000-12,000 words dissertation (100%).

        Resit: Apply to Head of School. Only in exceptional circumstances may students be permitted to resubmit a dissertation.

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        The dissertation supervision process provides continual formative assessment.

        Students receive individual, written feedback (using standard comments sheets) on their dissertation from two members of staff who have marked the thesis independently. Marks and comments sheets are made available after the June external exam board.

        GG 4049
        VALUATION AND MARINE DEVELOPMENT
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Mr D Green

        Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

        Note(s): This course will not be available in 2011/12. This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with GG 3051.

        This course provides students with an introduction to the concept of value, the measurement of value and methods of valuation. Principles of valuation are explained using examples from both land and coastal economy. Topics covered can include: the coastal property market; determinants of rental, capital and site value; cost of capital, equated yields and growth; extensions and renewal of leases; development and valuation of harbours, marinas and coastal areas including consideration of specific marine constraints and benefits.

        1 two-hour lectures and 1 one-hour tutorial per week.

        1st Attempt: 1 two-hour examination (67%) and continuous assessment (33%).

        GG 4065
        CULTURAL IDENTITY AND PLACE CREATION
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Professor W Neill

        Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 or above.

        Note(s): This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with the GG 3065. This course will not be available in 2011/12.

        The course is structured as follows

        Part 1. This will review recent theoretical writing on the role of place in the constitution of cultural identity and establish links to prior theorists in geography, economics and sociology.

        Part 2. This will be a case study of the spatiality of identity formation in the range of concrete city settings with a particular focus on urban planning and development. The tension with place marketing will recieve particular attention.

        Part 3. This will explore the concepts of urban citizenship and social capital as participatory processes for the construction of plural cities accommodating a variety of cultural identities. Level 4 students will study this in additional depth through individual case study presentations.

        10 two-hour lectures each week. Plus 4 additional hours for presentations/seminars.

        1st Attempt: 1 two-hour examination (67%) and continuous assessment (33%) - an essay/presentations.

        GG 4067
        INTEGRATED COASTAL MANAGEMENT
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Mr D R Green

        Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above. This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with GG 3067.

        This course adopts a multi-disciplinary approach to the problems of coastal management, so it is suitable for Geography, Marine and Coastal Resource Management and Planning students. The focus is mainly on coursework with some innovative student-based learning, which is developed using a scenario of a ‘Marine and Coastal Resource Consultancy project for the Scottish Office’. Therefore Integrated Coastal Management offers a range of vital skills for employment.

        1 two-hour lecture per week.

        1st Attempt: 100% coursework.

        GG 4068
        REMOTE SENSING AND GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr R Bingham

        Pre-requisite(s): GG 2510. Only available to students in Programme Year 4.

        Note(s): This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with GG 3029 or GG 4018.

        The course focuses on practical training in the use of remote sensing and GIS software and techniques to examine, analyse and present geographical issues. Emphasis is placed on giving students technical experience through project-based learning, with all sessions based in the computer lab and working with software such as ArcGIS and ERDAS Imagine. Project management and graphical presentation of results and analysis will also form a strong theme of the course. Students will be offered a range of projects to work on, which will reflect directly contemporary research being undertaken across the discipline of Geography and Environment. Staff in all areas of G&E will provide projects; computer practicals and support will be undertaken by GIS experts based in G&E.

        Ten 2-hour practical sessions based in a computing laboratory.

        1st Attempt: Coursework (100%): two project exercises.

        Resit: Not applicable.

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        Surgeries will be integrated into the course.

        Students receive individual, written feedback on their coursework using standard comments sheets.

        GG 4519
        PALAEOECOLOGY
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr D Mauquoy

        Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in programme year 4 who have passed GG 3026 or GG 4032.

        Note(s): This course will not be available in session 2011/12. This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with GG 3536. Due to limited facilities it may be necessary to limit numbers for this course. Please contact the course co-ordinator for further details.

        Introduction: principles of palaeoecology.
        Late-and postglacial palaecological patterns.
        Fieldwork: coring and collection of samples.
        Laboratory pretreatment of samples.
        Keys and modern material.
        Fossil materials.
        Collation and presentation of data.

        2 one-hour lecture/practicals per week (9 weeks) and 1 day field excursion; plus project presentation sessions.

        1st Attempt: Laboratory/field book (30%); project based on group data and analysis, but written up independently by individual (60%); presentation of project data (10%).

        GG 4538
        DISSERTATION
        CREDIT POINTS 30

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr L Philip

        Pre-requisite(s): Available to Senior Honours students who have passed GG 3547.

        Note(s): This course is only available in special circumstances, please contact the Head of School.

        Personal research supported by formal introduction to research methods (in associated course) and by regular supervision.

        Required field work: discussion with supervisor (15 hours).

        1st Attempt: In-course assessment (100%): submission of dissertation (including original work) on topic approved by Head of School.

        GG 4549
        HYDROGRAPHY
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr D R Green

        Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in programme year 3 and above who have passed MR 1510 and GG 2505.

        Note(s): This course will not be available in session 2012/13. This course is not available as part of a graduating curriculum with GG 3549.

        Brief history of navigation and hydrography and the current significance; review of applications; the elements of hydrography; method of fixing position afloat; unelevated position fixing; processing of hydrographic data.

        1 two-hour lecture per week.

        1st Attempt: 1 two-hour examination (67%) and in-course assessment (33%).

        GG 4556
        LIQUID GEOGRAPHY: THE GEOGRAPHY OF VINE AND WINE
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr D R Green

        Pre-requisite(s): At least one of GG 2003, GG 2004, GG 2504 or GG 2505, or permission of course coordinator.

        Note(s): This course will not be available in 2011/12. This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with GG 3556.

        This course will provide an introduction to the Geography of the Vine and Wine. It will include an examination of the historical aspects of geography and wine and the influence of climate and climate change, geology, and soils (terroir) on wine and viticulture (grape-growing). The impact of the wine industry on the cultural, historical, and environmental landscape will be also be considered. Students will develop an appreciation for the environmental constraints of vine growing together with the geographical characteristics of wines and wine regions. A study will be made of the wine industry, from vine to vineyard. This will include vineyard management to bottling, marketing and distribution. Finally, the application of remote sensing, digital mapping, GPS and GIS to vineyard management will also be studied, specifically focusing on the impact of geographical data and analysis on precision viticulture in vineyard management. Case studies will be drawn from around the world to illustrate various aspects of the module.

        12 two-hour lecture/discussion classes (weekly) to include four hours dedicated to specialist topics for Level 4 students. GIS practical sessions will be arranged. Occasional guest speakers.

        1st Attempt: 1 two-hour examination (67%); coursework (33%).

        Resit: Not applicable.

        GG 4559
        ESTATE MANAGEMENT
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Ms M Aspinall

        Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 3 or above.

        Note(s): This course will be available in 2012/13. This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with GG 3559. This course is ONLY available to students who are in programme year 4 and are enrolled for a Rural Surveying OR Rural Surveying and Spatial Planning study aim.

        This course focuses on practical aspects of rural Estate Management. It covers the business (financial appraisal), organisational aspects of rural land and property (tenancy arrangements, internal management structures, decision-making, setting aims/objectives), and management of specific estate activities (sporting and diversification). The course combines lectures and project work classes with half-day field visits to a number of rural estates.

        1 one-hour lecture per week, 4 one-hour tutorials fortnightly with student presentations, required field work: practical exercises.

        1st Attempt: 1 two-hour examination (67%) and coursework (33%).

        GG 4561
        PLANNING THEORY AND ETHICS
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Professor W J V Neill

        Pre-requisite(s): Successful completion of Programme Year 3 of an accredited programme in Spatial Planning.

        This course provides an awareness of theoretical debates which are crucial to understanding the assumptions implicit in spatial planning practice and the challenges confronting practitioners. Simply put, what guides to action are available to help planners in deciding how to act and in determining whether their actions have been appropriate. This raises fundamental questions about the very nature of spatial planning and its relationship to politics and power. The course, therefore, addresses such questions as:

        • What are the justifications for spatial planning and what goals should it have?

        • What procedural theory should guide the work of practitioners?

        • Whose interests does the spatial planning system serve?

        • How do we judge what constitutes fairness?

        • How do we conceive ethical action in spatial planning?

        Particular emphasis is placed through interactive seminars with practitioners and local politicians on the conflicts and tensions faced by planning professionals in conducting their day-to-day work.

        Two hours of lectures per week plus one day field excursion.



        Coursework: (33%) (individual/small group presentation) plus 2-hour exam: (67%).

        Resit: Not applicable.

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        Formative assessment will be primarily based on individual presentations.

        By standard feedback sheets and discussion in staff office hours.

        GG 4563
        APPLIED MARINE AND COASTAL SIMULATION STUDIES
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Mr D R Green

        Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 with a School of Geosciences study aim. Students from other Schools may be admitted at the discretion of the Course Coordinator. This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with GG 3563. This course will run in academic year 2010/11 and in alternate years thereafter.

        The OilSim simulation software offers a novel and innovative way to provide the basis to combine theory with practice and draws upon many different subjects including geography, GIS/digital mapping, ecology, oil and gas exploration, the marine and coastal sciences, and business etc. The first part of the course will provide essential theoretical background to the subject matter including the OilSim software with guided practical 'dummy' sessions on the use of the software tools and techniques. The second part of the course will provide a group learning environment to apply the theory in a competitive problem-solving environment. The course/module will run for 12 weeks as a 24 hour module. The first 6 weeks will focus on learning the background and theory, together with familiarisation with the OilSim simulation software. The second 6 weeks will focus on running the simulation 'for real', culminating in completion of the simulation exercise.

        6 two-hour lecture/practical and 6 two-hour computer laboratory sessions. In addition an occasional guest speaker (from ACC/Simprentis).

        1st Attempt: Course-work based assessment (100%) with no examination in the normal examination period. Written exercise based on the theory taught in the first half of the module (33%) plus 1 two-hour online simulation examination (where groups will be in competition) (67%).

        Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (100%).

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        GG 4564
        CURRENT ISSUES IN MARINE AND COASTAL MANAGEMENT
        CREDIT POINTS 30

        Course Co-ordinator: Mr D R Green and Dr N Spedding

        Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in Programme Year 4 of the BSc MCRM.

        A selection of the most important past, present and future coastal and marine issues facing society around the world will be explored by staff and students. Some typical examples might be: the impact of sea level rise and climate change on coastal communities around the world; coastal disasters such as hurricanes and tsunami on coastal settlements eg New Orleans, Indonesia; current technologies for monitoring, mapping and modelling the marine and coastal environment; renewable energies such as wind and wave power and their impact on the environment; the environmental impact of offshore gas and oil exploration activities and the development of future unmanned platforms; tools for the effective management of the coast, Marine Spatial Planning (MSP); implementing European legislation eg, the Water Framework Directive; the role of coastal forums in management of the UK coast; capacity building in ICZM; the sustainable coast; the role of European funding projects in the future of coastal management; implementing a spatial data infrastructure (SDI) for data collection and sharing; linking science and policy, etc. The course also explores how you can best make use of your degree in the 'real world' after graduation: workshops run in partnership with the University's Career Service provide practical advice and training on how best to develop your career.

        Part A (25% of the total workload): four careers / employability workshops. Part B (75% of the total workload): introductory sessions and/or supporting web materials to guide independent study, plus 4 two-hour seminars with student presentations.

        1st Attempt: Coursework (100%):
        Part A: portfolio of careers-related coursework
        Part B: one seminar presentation (40%) plus three pieces of written work (60%).

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        GG 4565
        LAND AND MARINE CONSERVATION
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Mr B Walton and Dr n Spedding

        Pre-requisite(s): At least one of the following courses: LE 2530, GG 2004, GG 2504, MR 2505.

        Note(s): Available only to students in programme year 4. This course may not be taken as part of any graduating curriculum with GG 3565. The course will run in alternate years. This course will not be available in 2011/12.

        This course is designed for students with an interest in how best to make use of land, water and cultural resources. It examines the science, ethics, economics, law and politics of land and marine management at a variety of geographic levels from the international down to the local, and draws heavily upon case studies from the USA, the UK and the rest of Europe. Potential examples include the protection and management of: Antarctica; fish stocks; areas of natural beauty; historical cities; and the peri-urban fringe from the threats posed by the likes of: mineral extraction; energy schemes; airport expansion; intensive farming practices; urban sprawl and tourism/leisure proposals.

        The course will be taught through a mixture of lectures, discussions and seminars, supported by self directed learning. There will also be 2 one-day visits to local environmental 'hotspots' such as the Cairngorm Natonal Park and the Sands of Forvie / Menie Dunes.

        1st Attempt: Coursework (67%) (cast study: report and presentation) plus examination (33%).

        Resit: Original coursework carried forward (67%) plus examination (33%).

        GG 4566
        GEOGRAPHICAL ISSUES
        CREDIT POINTS 30

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr N Spedding

        Pre-requisite(s): GG 3031 or GG 3052 or GG 3063

        Geographical Issues explores the frontiers of geographical knowledge as it examines some of the 'cutting edge' debates associated with:

      • new philosophies and methodologies;

      • the relationships between geography and other academic disciplines;

      • applications of academic geography to real world problems.


      • The course integrates the various components of your geographical education to date. You are expected to draw together, and build on, your knowledge from previous courses to help you tackle challenging, perhaps unfamiliar, topics. The course involves the preparation of presentations and short papers on a series of high-profile issues pertinent to contemporary geography. More information on the topics selected will be provided on the course website, on the Level 4 noticeboard and at the first meeting of the class at the start of the second half-session. The course also explores how you can best make use of your degree in the 'real world' after graduation: workshops run in partnership with the University's Career Service provide practical advice and training on how best to develop your career.

        Part A (25% of the total workload): four careers / employability workshops. Part B (75% of the total workload): introductory sessions and/or supporting web materials to guide independent study, plus 4 two-hour seminars with student presentations.

        1st Attempt: Coursework (100%):
        Part A: portfolio of careers-related coursework
        Part B: one seminar presentation (40%) plus three pieces of written work (60%).

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        GG 4567
        ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr T Mighall

        Pre-requisite(s): Available only to students in programme year 4 or above who have passed GG 2003 and/or GG 2504.

        Note(s): This course will not be available in session 2011/12. This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with GG 3567.

        The course will cover a series of themes which will be taught as principles and as integrated topics. Areas to be covered will include the chronological and climatic framework of the Quaternay, glacial and interglacial cycles, landforms and soils.

        2 one-hour lecture/practicals per week; 2 field trips plus directed learning replace 4 hours of lectures.

        1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (67%) and in-course assessment - project(33%).

        GG 4569
        HUMAN GEOGRAPHY: HONOURS FIELD COURSE
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: TBC (rotates on an annual basis).

        Pre-requisite(s): GG 2011 and GG 2508

        Co-requisite(s): Research Design (GG 3571 or GG 3572 currently) and Concepts in Human Geography.

        Note(s): Teaching for this course begins in the second half-session of third year. Normally this course will only run if 10 or more students are registered. Students are asked to make their own travel arrangements to and from the field course venue and they are also asked to make a contribution towards the cost of the field course. Please ask for further details.

        Building on content introduced in the complementary course Concepts in Human Geography, material will cover theory, background information and case studies appropriate to the chosen field area. Students will design and execute projects that target specific human geographical aspects of their choice (e.g., addressing how hybridity, mobility, difference/diversity, regional development or globalisation affect the social spaces of the field area).

        Typically 6 x 2-hour preparatory sessions plus six days fieldwork, typically:

        • days 1 and 2 tour of the area, to highlight key features and issues, and to permit reconnaissance of field sites.

        • days 3, 4 and 5 group work on specific field projects, supplemented by evening sessions (data collation and interpretation, preparation of field diary).
        • day 6 individual field presentations on group projects.

        1st Attempt: 100% coursework: pre-trip presentation, project diary/field notebook, end of trip presentation (each 16.67%) plus final report (50%).

        Resit: Resubmission of failed project work, with mark for those components to be capped at CAS 9.

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        Students work in groups, supported by staff, to prepare their field trip projects. Students are expected to keep a diary/notebook that records the progress of their project. Pre-trip and end-of-trip presentations provide opportunities for formative feedback that can be used to improve students' performance at the next task/stage of assessment. Production of the report provides useful practice, with feedback, for students who will submit a dissertation.

        Feedback (verbal and/or written) on students' pre-trip presentation before the field trip provides opportunities to adjust the proposed research design. Feedback (verbal and/or written) on students' end-of-trip presentation provides opportunities to adjust the processing and write-up of data. Students receive individual written feedback on their project report.

        GG 4570
        MONTANE ENVIRONMENTS
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: TBC (rotates on an annual basis).

        Pre-requisite(s): GG 2010 and GG 2508

        Co-requisite(s): GG 3052 or Research Design (GG 3571 or GG 3572 currently) plus Techniques in Physical Geography.

        Note(s): Teaching for this course begins in the second half-session of third year. Normally this course will only run if 10 or more students are registered. Students are asked to make their own travel arrangements to and from the field course venue and they are also asked to make a contribution towards the cost of the field course. Please ask for further details.

        General material will cover:

        • The influence of tectonics, structure and lithology on alpine landforms.

        • Glacial and glacio-fluvial processes and landforms.

        • Slope processes and forms characteristic of high altitudes and steep relief.

        • Alpine ecosystems, water resource and hazard management in alpine areas.

        • The interactions between alpine climate, ecology, hydrology and geomorphology responsible for landscape change.

        Students will design and execute projects that target specific aspects of their choice.

        Typically 6 x 2-hour preparatory sessions plus six days fieldwork, typically:

        • days 1 and 2 - tour of the area, to highlight key features and issues, and to permit reconnaissance of field sites.

        • days 3, 4 and 5 - group work on specific field projects, supplemented by evening sessions (data collation and interpretation, preparation of field diary).
        • day 6 - individual field presentations on group projects.

        1st Attempt: 100% coursework: pre-trip presentation, project diary/field notebook, end of trip presentation (each 16.67%) plus final report (50%).

        Resit: Resubmission of failed project work, with mark for those components to be capped at CAS 9.

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        Students work in groups, supported by staff, to prepare their field trip projects. Students are expected to keep a diary/notebook that records the progress of their project. Pre-trip and end-of-trip presentations provide opportunities for formative feedback that can be used to improve students' performance at the next task/stage of assessment. Production of the report provides useful practice, with feedback, for students who will submit a dissertation.

        Feedback (verbal and/or written) on students' pre-trip presentation before the field trip provides opportunities to adjust the proposed research design. Feedback (verbal and/or written) on students' end-of-trip presentation provides opportunities to adjust the processing and write-up of data. Students receive individual written feedback on their project report.