University of Aberdeen Takes you to the main page for this section

ENGINEERING

> Level 1
EG 1008
PRINCIPLES OF ELECTRONICS
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr T Thevar

Pre-requisite(s): Higher Mathematics

Co-requisite(s): None

The aim of the course is to introduce basic concepts of electronics within a context of general engineering. The topics covered are kept at levels 1 and 2. A further aim of the course is to illustrate applications of the concepts discussed that are of interest to all students. It will adopt the philosophy of application oriented teaching. During each topic the students will be provided with examples of day-to-day devices that they will understand by the end of that topic. The theoretical aspects of the course are placed in an illustrative practical context.

The course includes atomic theory and the concept of current flow. The basic principles of electrical circuits are introduced. Ohm's law is applied to simple dc circuits. The origin of electronics is introduced through the concept of "black box" amplifiers and their application. Operational amplifier circuits and some applications are discussed and analysed. Logic gates, Boolean algebra, and logic design illustrate that application of digital electronics. Practical examples of digital circuit implementation are provided. The course also provides an overview of wave theory and propagation with emphasis on electronic communication. Finally an introduction to ac concepts is provided.

The course will consist of 30 one-hour lectures, 6 one-hour tutorials and 5 two-hour laboratory/design sessions. Detailed schedules are provided separately.

1st Attempt: One written examination of three-hours duration (80%) and continuous assessment based on the laboratory/design exercises (20%).

Resit: One written examination of three-hours duration (80%), with previous coursework marks used to make up the remaining (20%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students will have their log book and lab reports assessed on several occasions during the half session, and these will be returned to them with markers' comments. There will also be opportunities for informal formative assessment and feedback in the weekly tutorial sessions.

The return of marked coursework (log books and lab reports) will provide formal feedback to the students. Informal feedback will be provided during weekly tutorial sessions.

EG 1009
FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Kashtalyan

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

  • Introduction. Materials, processes and choice: a historical prospective. Overview of material properties – physical, mechanical, thermal, electrical, magnetic, optical, chemical – with examples of where these properties are important. (2 lectures)

  • Organising materials and processes. Classification of materials and its hierarchical structure. Overview of the main classes of materials: metals, ceramics, polymers, hybrids. Material property charts. Classification of processes and its hierarchical structure. Computer-aided information management for materials and processes using CES Edupack. Materials and processes in the context of design. Case studies. (4 lectures)

  • Physical properties. density and how it is measured. Relevance to engineering applications. Underpinning principles: atomic structure. Exploring density chart with CES Edupack. (1 lecture)

  • Mechanical properties: stiffness. Modes of loading. Engineering stress and strain. Stress-strain curve. Elastic deformation, Hooke’s law and elastic moduli. Young’s modulus and its measurement. Underpinning principles: atomic packing and bonding. Bonding and packing in metals. Important crystallographic structures: hpc, fcc, bcc. Atom packing in ceramics, glasses and polymers. Exploring the modulus-density and modulus-cost charts with CES Edupack. (7 lectures)

  • Mechanical properties: yield and tensile strengths. Ductility. Definitions and measurement. Hardness test. Underpinning principles: crystalline imperfections. Exploring the yield strength-density and modulus-yield strength charts with CES Edupack. (3 lectures)

  • Thermal properties of materials. Melting temperature, glass temperature, thermal expansion, thermal conduction, heat capacity. Exploiting thermal properties. Using materials at high temperatures. Temperature dependence of material properties. (3 lectures)

  • Processing of materials. Shaping, joining and surface treatment and their attributes. Exploring material-process compatibility with CES Edupack. Shaping processes for metals (sand, investment and die casting). Microstructure evolution in processing. Underpinning principles: phase diagrams and the solidification of alloys. Shaping processes for polymers (injection, blow and rotational moulding). Deformation processes: rolling, forging, extrusion, drawing. Underpinning principles: Annealing of metals. Powder methods. Underpinning principles: diffusion. Joining processes (adhesive bonding, mechanical fastening, soldering and welding). (8 lectures)

  • Materials, processes and the environment. Material consumption and its growth. The material life cycle. Criteria for life cycle assessment: embodied energy, process energy and end of life potential. Exploring charts for embodied energy with CES Edupack. Selecting materials for eco-design. (2 lectures)

The course will consist of 30 one-hour lectures, 6 tutorials and 5 two-hour laboratory sessions. Detailed schedules are provided separately.

1st Attempt: One written examination of two-hours duration (80%) and continuous assessment based on the laboratory/design exercises (20%).

Resit: One written examination of two-hours duration (80%), with previous coursework marks used to make up the remaining (20%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students will have their log book and lab reports assessed on several occasions during the half session, and these will be returned to them with markers' comments. There will also be opportunities for informal formative assessment and feedback in the weekly tutorial sessions.

The return of marked coursework (log books and lab reports) will provide formal feedback to the students. Informal feedback will be provided during weekly tutorial sessions.

EG 1010
CAD AND COMMUNICATION IN ENGINEERING PRACTICE
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr H Sun

Pre-requisite(s): None

1. Oral Presentation: Preparing oral presentation using different and appropriate formats; best practice in oral presentation; use Microsoft PowerPoint as an effective presentation tool; importing of data from other sources into MS PowerPoint.
2. Written Presentation: Devise and follow a standard format of report writing; style and structure of reports; use Microsoft (MS) Word and the facilities for correcting grammar and spelling; importing data from other sources into MS Word; use MS Excel spreadsheets for solving engineering problems and for producing graphs; use the library and the internet website as information resource for written and oral presentations.
3. Ethics, Environment and Personal Development: Introduce plagiarism, copyright and intellectual property, and different standard referencing styles; knowledge of all work is carried out within the confines of plagiarism and copyright laws; an exercise on Famous Engineer leading to a formal report essay for marking; review of engineering events with environmental issues, personal development planning, and CV writing.
4. Introduction to CAD: Standards for engineering drawings including what a 'standard' is and why it exists; interpreting engineering drawing; use of SolidWorks for 3D sketching and producing 3D objects and simple assemblies from a series of 3D objects; converting 3D drawings of objects and assemblies into first and third angle engineering drawings; enhancement of engineering drawings using sections and break outs.

19 one-hour lectures; 11 two-hour CAD practical sessions, 8 two-hour Workshop sessions for other parts of the course

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (100%)

Resit: Students who 'No Paper' any element of assessment will not be given resubmission opportunity and will be required to re-register for this course or its equivalent at the next available opportunity. All other students should be referred to the course coordinator for resubmission.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Due to continuous assessment and progressive nature of this course together with the student numbers and the volume of submitted work the feedback provided will be of a generic nature. This feedback will take the form of a 15 minute feedback session at the start of each lecture where typical assignment specific problems will be demonstrated and explained in order that students will be aware of any errors in their own assignment submissions. Students who are still unclear about their assignments can contact the course contributor and arrange a meeting to discuss their issues.

Due to continuous assessment and progressive nature of this course together with the student numbers and the volume of submitted work the feedback provided will be of a generic nature. This feedback will take the form of a 15 minute feedback session at the start of each lecture where typical assignment specific problems will be demonstrated and explained in order that students will be aware of any errors in their own assignment submissions. Students who are still unclear about their assignments can contact the course contributor and arrange a meeting to discuss their issues.

EG 1011
INTRODUCTORY MATHEMATICS
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr David Quinn

Pre-requisite(s): Higher Mathematics (Grade C).

Co-requisite(s): None

  • Algebra, geometry, trigonometry, exponentials and logarithms. Powers, laws of indices.

  • Co-ordinate geometry: Cartesian co-ordinates, equations of straight line and circle.

  • Parametric representation of curves. Trigonometry: circular function, identities.

  • Recurrence relations (the limit of the sequence resulting from a recurrence relation) Factor/Remainder Theorem and quadratic theory.

  • Vectors in three dimensions: Scalar multiple, position vector, unit vector, component. Vector addition and multiplication by a scalar. Scalar product. Determine the distance between two points in three dimensional space.

  • Basic differentiation: Introduction to the derivative. Slopes. Newton Quotient. Rate of change and velocity. Derivatives of elementary functions. Differentiable at a point. Differentiable over an interval. The derived function (terms rate of change, average gradient, strictly increasing, strictly decreasing, stationary point (value), maximum turning point (value), minimum turning point (value), point of inflexion, the chain rule, basic trigonometric functions. Higher derivatives.

  • Basic integration: Introduction to integration: Integral, integrate, constant of integration, definite integral, limits of integration, indefinite integral. Area under a curve. Integration of elementary functions. Evaluate definite integrals. Determine the area bounded by two curves. Application of integration to finding areas, volumes of revolution, lengths of paths, first moments of area and centres of gravity of uniform laminae.

2½ one-hour lectures, and 1 one-hour tutorial per week. 5 two-hour lab or problem-solving sessions.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (80%) and continuous assessment (20%).

Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (80%) and continuous assessment (20%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students will have their continuous assessment work returned to them with markers' comments. There will also be informal formative assessment and feedback in the weekly tutorial sessions.

Feedback will be provided by the return of marked coursework, and informal feedback at weekly tutorial sessions.

EG 1501
ELECTRONICS DESIGN
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr D Hendry

Pre-requisite(s): EG 1008

Co-requisite(s): EG 1503

  • Charges, charge per unit length, area and volume, dimensional analysis, forces on charges, Coulomb’s law, Millikan’s experiment, electric field and its units, work on a charged particle, voltage and its relation to electric field. Voltages and electric fields at the surface of a conductor. The parallel plate capacitor, Q=CV, forces on parallel plates; Electrostatic energy; dielectrics; Capacitors as circuit components, ac impedance. The electrostatic loudspeaker. (5 lectures)

  • Magnetic fields, magnets and compasses; Magnetic field due to a current carrying conductor; Visualising magnetic fields; Forces on a current carrying conductor; simple DC electric motors; The Earth’s magnetic field; Magnetostatic energy; simple magnetic materials; the inductor, ac impedance the solenoid; the transformer . (7 lectures)

  • Semiconductor devices: semiconductors, dopants, p-type, n-type, the p-n junction and the diode equation; the photodiode, camera sensors, opto-isolator; the bipolar transistor and its circuit behaviour; the common emitter amplifier; FETs and the MOSFET, simple logic circuits (inverter, NAND, NOR); the Thyristor and the Triac. (8 lectures)

  • The SPICE circuit simulator; entering a simple circuit; types of analyses; (3 lectures)

  • Circuit theory: Kirchoff’s laws and examples of their application; Thevenin and a better common emitter amp; Norton; Applications to operational amplifier circuits; Differentiating circuits, integrating circuits. (5 lectures)

  • The light shield design example, use of a photodiode to detect incoming light as a means of protecting a “priceless artefact” using a solenoid and mechanical slotted device. (2 lectures)

30 one-hour lectures, 12 one-hour tutorials and 5 two-hour laboratory/design sessions.  Detailed schedules are provided separately.

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (80%) and continuous assessment based on laboratory/design exercises (20%).

Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (80%) and continuous assessment based on laboratory/design exercises (20%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students will have their log book and lab reports assessed on several occasions during the half session, and these will be returned to them with markers' comments. There will also be opportunities for informal formative assessment and feedback in the weekly tutorial sessions.

The return of marked coursework (log books and lab reports) will provide formal feedback to the students. Informal feedback will be provided during weekly tutorial sessions.

EG 1502
FUNDAMENTAL ENGINEERING MECHANICS
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr P C Davidson

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

1. Coordinate Systems, Newton’s Second and Third Laws, Static Equilibrium and Equations of Motion

  • Definition of Cartesian coordinate system for planar motion. Statement of equations of motion and static equilibrium

  • Definition of Polar coordinate system for planar motion. Statement of equations of motion and static equilibrium.


  • 2. Free Body Diagrams - Static Equilibrium
  • Beam

  • Truss structures

  • Gears, levers and pulleys


  • 3. Free Body Diagrams – Dynamic Equations of Motion
  • Accelerating car

  • Projectile including variable mass?

  • Spring mass damper system

  • Pendulum


  • 4. Definition of Stress and Strain
  • Definition of uniaxial stress and strain

  • Definition of shear stress and strain


  • 5. Loading of Beams
  • Shear Force Diagrams

  • Bending Moment Diagrams


  • 6. Trusses
  • Method of sections


  • 7. Work-Energy Methods
  • Free fall under gravity

  • Compression of a spring buffer


  • 8. Impulse Momentum Methods
  • Impact of rigid bodies
  • The course will consist of 30 one-hour lectures, 12 one-hour tutorials and 5 two-hour laboratory/design sessions. Detailed schedules are provided separately.

    1st Attempt: 1 written examination of two hours duration (80%) and continuous assessment based on the laboratory/design exercises (20%).

    Resit: 1 written examination of three hours duration (80%), with previous coursework marks used to make up the remaining (20%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Students will have their log book and lab reports assessed on several occasions during the half session, and these will be returned to them with markers' comments. There will also be opportunities for informal formative assessment and feedback in the weekly tutorial sessions.

    The return of marked coursework (log books and lab reports) will provide formal feedback to the students. Informal feedback will be provided during weekly tutorial sessions.

    EG 1504
    ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS 1
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Sevastyanov

    Pre-requisite(s): Higher Mathematics (Grade B).

    • Revision: Basic differentiation & Integration: Rules of differentiation - sum, product rule. Higher derivatives. Maxima & Minima: The idea and the basic tests, including 2nd derivative tests. Higher derivatives.

    • Differential calculus: Chain and quotient rule. The inverse trig functions arcsin, arccos, arctan and their derivatives. Log and exp. Properties and derivatives. Sinh, cosh & tanh. Taylor series approximations.

    • Integral Calculus: Basic techniques: substitution, parts, partial fractions. Reduction formulae. Definite integrals. Definite integrals and applications of integration to finding areas, volumes of revolution, lengths of paths, first moments of area and centres of gravity of uniform laminae.

    • Complex Numbers: The arithmetic of complex numbers. Argand plane. Modulus, conjugate, argument etc. Polar form and de Moivre's theorem. Solution of zn = 1. Theory of equations: Roots and factors of polynomials. Multiple roots. Fundamental theorem of Algebra. Complex roots of real polynomials occur in conjugate pairs. The Fourier matrix and applications.
    • 30 one-hour lectures, 1 one-hour tutorial per week and 5 two-hour problem solving sessions.

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (80%) and continuous assessment (20%).

      Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (80%) and continuous assessment (20%).

       

      > Level 2
      EG 2002
      PROCESS ENGINEERING
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr E Bain

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 1503

      Co-requisite(s): None

      Engineering processes take raw materials and covert them into useful products. The transfer of mass, energy, momentum and charge within an engineering system play an important role in how processes achieve this. Students will be introduced to the basic concepts involved in modelling engineering processes and the use of units and dimensional analysis. The use of energy and mass balances will then be covered, with simple shell balances developed into more complex process problems before introducing the general concepts of rate of transfer, driving force and resistance. The course then considers macroscopic and microscopic level transport for each of heat, mass, momentum, and charge in turn, with students gaining insights into the similarities and differences between the various transport phenomena. Within each section, students will examine the equations governing the transport process in question, link these to real physical mechanisms occurring, and then see how these are then applied to real engineering systems. The taught material is supported by a range of simulation, laboratory, and problem based learning exercises.

      28 one-hour lectures, 6 one-hour tutorials and 3 three-hour practicals in total

      1st Attempt: 3hr written examination (80%); continuous assessment (20%).

      Resit: 3hr written examination (100%).

      Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

      WebCT quiz each week; Reading groups; class presentations.

      Feedback provided through WebCt functionality (students will be able to track their progress); two class tests (which will be marked).

      EG 2004
      FLUID MECHANICS AND THERMODYNAMICS
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Mrs N Nikora

      Pre-requisite(s): N/A

      Co-requisite(s): N/A

      The course begins with the material properties of fluids. This is followed by a study of the principles of fluid motion including the development of the basic equations. Bernoulli's equation is used to explain the relationship between pressure and velocity. Various kinds of energy losses in a pipeline are studied.
      Reversible and irreversible processes are explained. The First Law of Thermodynamics is presented. The function of state enthalpy is introduced. The steady flow equation is presented and applied to turbines, boilers, condensers and compressors. The Second Law is applied to operations on an ideal gas and to entropy changes in heating. The Third Law is introduced. The work functin is developed and its importance as an index of the efficiency of engines explained. The use of steam tables is discussed and selected thermodynamic cycles are analysed.

      36 one-hour lectures, 8 one-hour tutorials, 6 hours lab practicals.

      1st Attempt: 1 three hour written examination (80%); continuous assessment (20%).

      Resit: 1 three hour written examination (100%).

      Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

      The lab exercises and online quizzes require the students to submit their reports and quizzes' solutions for marking in order for formative assessment and feedback to be provided

      Feedback includes marking of the lab exercises' reports with feedback comments, marking of online quizzes, discussion on issues/performance at tutorial sessions, and forward feedback on common mistakes from past exams. Students can also receive feedback on their progress with the course on request at the weekly tutorial/feedback sessions and at the lab sessions.

      EG 2005
      ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS 2
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Professor R Levi

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 1503, Engineering Mathematics 1

      Approximation & Taylor Series, Ordinary Differential Equations, Partial Differentiation.

      The course will consist of 30 one-hour lectures and 12 one-hour tutorials and 5 two-hour problem solving sessions.

      1st Attempt: One written examination of three hours duration (80%) and in-course assessment (20%).

      Resit: One written examination of three-hours duration (100%).

      Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

      Formative assessment will be provided at problem solving sessions.

      Students will receive formative feedback through coursework assignments, and at problem solving sessions and tutorial classes. Feedback on summative assessment will be provided through marked coursework assignments.

      EG 2501
      DESIGN AND COMPUTING
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr H Sun

      Pre-requisite(s): EG1010 CAD, Communication in Engineering Practice

      Design and Solid Modelling
      Principles of product specification and engineering design process and procedures. Product specifications within the confines of customer requirements, fit-for-purpose, quality and cost effective production.
      Further development of solid modelling and engineering drawing skills through hands-on experience of using SolidWorks for configurations and simple structural analysis, linear and geometrical tolerances, fasteners etc. Extended design exercise involving the use of SolidWorks to produce precise and accurate drawings from written specification taking account of the limitations of the manufacturing process.
      Professional Design Lectures (PDL) and Ethics Lectures
      Principles of product specification and engineering design process and procedures; Product specifications within the confines of customer requirements, fit-for-purpose, quality and cost effective production; Engineering project design, covered in PDL by visiting speakers from industries; Ethics issues in engineering/working environments will be studied in depths; Development of an existing design using reverse engineering within the requirements of Copyright, patents and design protection laws.
      Workshop Practice Hands-on exercises on the manufacture of simple parts using variety of machine tools and joining processes. Computing Knowledge of MATLAB as engineering analysis tool is developed through lectures and practical sessions on: basic arithmetic, functions and data structures; graph plotting and interpretation; vectors and matrices; complex numbers; polynomials and the integration of functions. Applications are developed for simple mechanical design exercise using engineering problems using batch files and basic programming constructs including loops and conditional statements. Each group prepares a report of the outcome of this work.

      19 one-hour lectures; 14 two-hour computing/design practical sessions; 3 two-hour workshop practical sessions; 5 three and a half-hour hands-on workshops in Aberdeen College

      1st Attempt: Continues assessment (100%)

      Resit: Students who 'No Paper' any element of assessment will not be given resubmission opportunity and will be required to re-register for this course or its equivalent at the next available opportunity. All other students should be referred to the course coordinator for resubmission.

      Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

      Students must participate in all continuously assessed work and submit their reports and engineering drawings for marking when required.

      Due to continuous assessment and progressive nature of this course together with the student numbers and the volume of submitted work the feedback provided will be of a generic nature. This feedback will take the form of a 15 minute feedback session at the start of each lecture where typical assignment specific problems will be demonstrated and explained in order that students will be aware of any errors in their own assignment submissions. Students who are still unclear about their assignments can contact the course contributor and arrange a meeting to discuss their issues.

      EG 2502
      SOLIDS AND STRUCTURES
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr O Menshykov

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 1009, EG 1502

      Co-requisite(s): None

      Stress Analysis

      1. Review of definitions of normal and shear stress and strain; complementary nature of shear stresses; two-
      dimensional stress; shear and normal stress on oblique planes; principal stress; elastic stress-strain
      relation: Young?s modulus, Poisson?s ratio, and shear modulus; extensional stiffness; thermal strains and
      stresses. (3 lectures)

      2. Membrane stresses: Thin-walled circular cylindrical and spherical vessels subject to internal pressure. (1 lecture)

      3. Torsion and torsional shear stresses in solid and hollow circular sections. Polar second moment of area,
      angle of twist. Torsional stiffness. Transmission of power by circular shafts. Combined torsion and direct stress. (2 lectures)

      Mechanical Behaviour of Solids

      4. Significance of defects and stress concentration in engineering design; origin of notches, defects and cracks:
      sharp corners, surface roughness, joining defects, porosity, inclusion of foreign objects; stress concentration
      factor. (1 lecture)

      5. Introduction to brittle fracture: Strain energy, surface energy and theoretical strength of solids; fracture toughness
      parameter, Kc and its applications. (2 lectures)

      6. Enhancement of fracture toughness, strength and stiffness: reinforced concrete, toughened glass, composites -
      upper and lower bound estimates of modulus; cellular foams. (2 lectures)

      7. Introduction to fatigue: description of fatigue, its occurrence, S-N curves and design implications. (1 lecture)

      8. Non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of structures: Ultrasonic methods, magnetic particle inspection, dye penetrant,
      radiography, acoustic method; introduction to strain gauges. (2 lectures)

      Structural Analysis

      9. Theory of elastic bending of beams, distribution of bending stress and strain. Radius of curvature, second
      moments of area, parallel axis theorem, section modulus. (3 lectures)

      10. Deflection of beams using integration method; bending stiffness. (3 lectures)

      11. Combined bending and direct stresses. Middle third rule. (2 lectures)

      12. Buckling of ideal columns. Concept of effective length. (2 lectures)

      13. Virtual work. Deflections of trusses. (3 lectures)

      14. Shear stress distributions for rectangular and I-sections beams. (1 lecture)

      Design Applications

      15. Selection of material and shape for strength and stiffness limited designs; application of CES software. (2 lectures)

      27 hours lecture, 6 hours tutorial, 6 hours practicals.

      1st Attempt: 1 three hour written examination (80%); continuous assessment (20%).

      Resit:1 three hour written examination (100%).

      Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

      N/A

      Feedback includes marking of log books of the lab exercises with feedback comments, discussion on issues/performance at tutorial sessions, and forward feedback on common mistakes from past exams.

      EG 2503
      ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL SYSTEMS
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr Majid Aleyaasin

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 1008

      Co-requisite(s): None

      Note(s): A-level or Advanced Higher physics are alternative pre-requisites

      The course content shall be the following:

      1. Introduction to an electrical ? mechanical system, Introduction to phasors and AC circuit theory, Multi-element circuits,
      Resonance of three element AC circuits, Power factor correction of AC circuits

      2. Basic Electromagnetism, Electrical machines: transformers, basic electromechanics, shunt and separately excited DC
      generators, series and shunt DC motors, stepper motors

      3. Free vibration: Spring-mass-damper system from free body diagram to mathematical representation. Analogue of LCR
      circuit. Damping coefficient, logarithmic decrement. Forced vibration: Spring-mass-damper system from free body diagram
      to mathematical representation. Analogue of LCR circuit. Frequency response. Dynamic magnifier.

      The course will consist of 30 one hour lectures , 10 one hour tutorials, and 5 two-hour laboratory/design sessions.
      (Timetable to be arranged)

      1st Attempt: One written examination of three hours duration (80%), continuous assessment based on the tutorials (10%), continuous assessment based on the laboratory /design exercises (10%). A minimum of CAS 6 will be required in each of these components.

      Resit: One written examination of three hours duration (100%).

      Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

      Lectures will include PRS multiple choice questions on the material being delivered. Feedback will be given over the course of the lab exercises as to the presentation and content of the submissions.

      Marked tutorial submissions by allocated study groups will be returned to the students within one week. Students will assess each other's contribution within these groups. The lab exercise submissions will be discussed in small groups. Marked submissions will be returned to the students promptly. The PRS system provides instant feedback on classroom understanding of content.

      EG 2504
      ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr F Verdicchio

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 1008, EG 1501.

      Co-requisite(s): None.

      Note(s): A-level or Advanced Higher Physics are alternative pre-requisites.

      The course content shall be the following:

      1. Review of digital electronics: comparison of digital and analogue systems.

      2. Sequential logic: synchronous logic; registers and shift registers. Examples of digital logic applications in an
        engineering context.

      3. Basic architecture of programmable systems; software versus hardware; Microcontrollers and embedded systems; Integrating components to form real-world systems. Computer Systems Software; High and low level languages; interpreters and compilers.

      4. Fundamentals of real-time systems; timers; serial interfacing; asynchronous serial I/O; characters, common formats
        (eg. GPS strings); parity; case study using ASCII I/O.

      The course will consist of 30 one-hour lectures, 6 one-hour tutorials, and associated laboratory/design sessions. (Timetable to be arranged)

      1st Attempt: One written examination of three-hours duration (80%), continuous assessment based on the tutorials and laboratory /design exercises (20%). A minimum of CAS 6 will be required in each of these components.

      Resit: One written examination of three-hours duration (100%).

      Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

      The course will include opportunities to assess individual progress with the concepts and material being delivered. Feedback will be given over the course of the lab exercises as to the presentation and content of the submissions.

      Marked submissions will be returned to the students promptly, including feedback on the laboratory exercises.

       

      > Level 3
      EG 3002
      ENGINEERING ANALYSIS AND METHODS 1A
      CREDIT POINTS 10

      Course Co-ordinator: Mr J Elmer

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 2510 together with EG 1570, ES 1571 or ES 1971.

      Note(s): Available only to students following an Honours degree programme.

      The course is set in an environment of engineering applications. Engineering applications of MATLAB are then discussed. The numerical solution of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is discussed in the context of MATLAB. A study is made of partial differential equations (PDEs) important to engineering including Laplace's equation and the wave and diffusion equations; boundary conditions are stressed. The facilities provided by the MATLAB Partial Differential Equations Toolbox are discussed. Practical work involving the MATLAB applications mentioned above is undertaken. The remainder of the course is devoted to the further study of Fourier Series and Fourier transforms, continuing the subject from level 2.

      2 one-hour lectures and 1 one-hour tutorial or practical per week. Detailed times are provided separately. There are no classes in week 20.

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (80%) and in-course assessment (20%).

      The in-course assessment will be based on a logbook record made of practical work based on MATLAB. The assessment will be based on the technical merit of the work done and the effectiveness of the records kept.

      EG 3015
      STRESS ANALYSIS A
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr A R Akisanya

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 2029 (CAS 9).

      Note(s): Note(s): Available only to candidates following an Honours degree programme.

      This course focuses on the fundamental relationship between the stresses and strains within engineering components and the load and displacements imposed at their boundaries. Analytical, experimental and numerical (finite element) methods are used predominantly for two-dimensional geometries and both elastic and plastic responses are considered. The design implications of material deformation are discussed.

      Students carry out experimental work to determine the stress distribution in an internally pressured cylinder. The finite element results of the stress distribution are compared with the thin-walled and thick-walled pressure vessel analyses.

      27 one-hour lectures, 5 one-hour tutorials and 3 three-hour practicals in total.

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (90%) and in-course assessment (10%).

      EG 3018
      FLUID MECHANICS A
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Professor T O'Donoghue

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 2539 (CAS 9).

      Note(s): Note(s): Available only to students following an Honours degree programme.

      The course begins with the concept of dynamic similarity and the application of dimensional analysis to experimental fluid mechanics and model-testing. This is followed by a study of steady and unsteady flow in pressure conduits, with emphasis on unsteady aspects including water hammer theory and surge protection. A section on fluid machines deals mainly with the performance of rotodynamic machines. It considers the theoretical performance of impulse and radial flow machines but stresses that actual performance is obtained from testing. Machine specific speed, cavitation problems and pump-pipeline matching are all considered. A section on open channel flow introduces basic concepts for the analysis of flow with a free surface. It deals with steady uniform flow and the importance of bed roughness and applies energy methods and momentum methods to cases of rapidly varied flow. The final section of the course introduces the students to porous media flow with applications in civil, mechanical, chemical and petroleum engineering.

      The laboratory exercises are designed to help understand and reinforce concepts covered in lectures. They involve separate experiments to study the performance characteristics of hydraulic machines and the essential features of flow in an open channel.

      27 one-hour lectures, 6 one-hour tutorials, and 3 three-hour practicals in total.

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (90%) and in-course assessment (10%).

      EG 3019
      ADVANCED TRANSPORT PROCESSES
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Campbell-Bannerman

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 2580

      This course focuses on theory of heat, mass, and momentum transport phenomena. The course includes fundamentals of non-Newtonian flow, fundamentals of multiphase flow, boiling and condensation, heat exchanger design methods, steady and unsteady mass transfer, mass transfer across phase boundary.

      Students carry out numerical calculation using Matlab or Excel and course work to support theory.

      27 one-hour lectures and 11 one-hour tutorials.

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (80%) and continuous assessment (20%).

      Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (100%).

      EG 3020
      PROCESS THERMODYNAMICS
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Kiefer

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 2539 Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics, EG 2002 Process Engineering

      The course begins with an introduction to essential process engineering thermodynamics. The ideal gas law and equations for the computation of process heat/work requirements for isochoric, isobaric and isothermal processes are briefly revised. The P-V and P-T phase diagrams for a pure substance are reviewed. The isothermal compressibility and volume expansivity are discussed for liquids. Vapour pressure and the Antoine Equation are treated allowing two-component vapour-liquid equilibrium to be discussed in terms of Raoult's law and modified Raoult's law, Knowledge of single component behaviour is extended to an advanced level through a detailed treatment of PVT equations of state and generalized compressibility factor methods. The virial, van der Waals, Redlich-Kwong, Peng-Robinson and Benedict-Webb-Rubin equations of state are discussed. Generalized correlations for the compressibility factor, Z are treated. The PVT relations for real gases are applied to phase transitions for isobaric, isochoric, isothermal and adiabatic phase transitions by hand computation and simulation. PVT relations for real gas mixtures are addressed; Dalton's & Amagat's laws modified by compressibility and the pseudocritical method employing Kay's law are covered. Residual properties and the experimental dtermination of thermodynamic properties are addressed. Finally, the course completes with key topics in solution thermodynamics.

      27 one-hour lectures, 9 one-hour tutorials and 3 three-hour practicals (laboratories and simulation exercises). There are no classes, labs or tutorials in Week 20. Laboratories are carried out in accordance with the published rota.

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (80%) and continuous assessment (20%).
      The continuous assessment will be based on the submission of engineering reports detailing the practical work. Detailed information relating to the format of reports will be given during course contact time.

      Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (100%).

      EG 3027
      GEOTECHNICS 1A
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Ivanovic

      Pre-requisite(s): Two years of an Engineering degree programme or equivalent.

      Note(s): Available only to students following an Honours degree programme.

      The course provides an introduction to engineering geology, covering such topics as the formation and classification of weathering processes, plate teotonics, aggregates, groundwaterfluviatile and coastal processes, and site investigation. The main part of the course is devoted to a study of the engineering behaviour of soils. This commences with an introduction to field classification and a description of the phase composition of soils.

      Following a study of the shear strength of soils, aspects of foundation engineering are covered such as stress distribution, bearing capacity and settlement of foundations.

      Practical exercises provide an introduction to both classification and strength testing of soils and rocks to BS5930 and BS1377.

      27 one-hour lectures, 5 one-hour tutorials and 3 three-hour practicals in total.

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (90%) and in-course assessment (10%).

      EG 3034
      ENGINEERING MATERIALS A
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Prof I Guz

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 2029 (CAS 9).

      Note(s): Available only to students following an Honours degree programme.

      The course builds on the knowledge of engineering materials gained at Level 2 by focussing, initially, on the major engineering alloy systems - steels, aluminium alloys and titanium alloys. Strengthening mechanisms in these systems and the relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties are highlighted. The main failure and degredation processes of materials in service fracture, fatigue, creep and corrosion, are considered in some detail. Finally, as materials may have to be joined during manufacture of components and structures, the major welding and adhesive bonding processes are introduced.

      Practical work is undertaken to select materials for particular design scenarios using materials selection software.

      27 one-hour lectures, 5 one-hour tutorials, and 3 three-hour practicals in total

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (90%), and in-course assessment (10%).

      EG 3043
      CONTROL SYSTEMS A
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr Thevar

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 2559 (CAS 9).

      Note(s): Available only to students following an Honours degree programme.

      The course introduces basic concepts of feedback control systems using a number of practical examples. Mathematical modelling of physical systems and representing them in block diagrams with transfer functions are presented. Basic control system response characteristics (stability, transient response, steady state response) and analysis and design procedures are introduced using first and second order systems. Absolute and relative stability, the Routh-Hurwitz criterion and the root locus diagram are developed as general analysis and design tools. PID controllers and improvement of system performance using compensation techniques are investigated. The frequency domain approach is developed through use of the Bode diagram and application of lead and lag compensators.

      At the end of the course students will be able design a controller for any simple physical system in order to accomplish the specifications for the controlled parameter (eg temperature, pressure, weight, level, position). This will include mathematical modelling of the physical system, selection and design of an appropriate controller, validation of the overall system performance.

      The laboratory exercise develops the use of MATLAB/SIMULINK as computer-based tools. Effects of modelling approximations and the response characteristics are investigated.

      33 one-hour lectures, 10 one-hour tutorials, and 3 three-hour practicals in total.

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (90%), and in-course assessment (10%).

      EG 3052
      SIGNALS AND SYSTEMS A
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Aphale

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 2010 (CAS 9).

      Note(s): Available only to students following an Honours degree programme.

      The course commences with a review of techniques used to analyse and represent signals and systems, such as impulse response, Laplace transformation and state equations. Analogue and digital systems are analysed in the s and z domains respectively, as well as in the time domain, introducing concepts such as transfer functions and frequency response functions. Fourier techniques are used to examine the amplitude and phase spectra of signals. Concepts such as Autocorrelation and Cross correlation of signals as well as noise removal techniques are introduced. Practical work consists of a connected set of three laboratory exercises using Matlab exploring sampling, manipulation and correlation of signals.

      27 one-hour lectures, 5 one-hour tutorials and 3 three-hour practicals in total.

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (80%) and in-course assessment (20%).

      EG 3078
      ENGINEERING DESIGN (MEng)
      CREDIT POINTS 5

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr H Sun

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 2501

      Note(s): Available only to students in programme year 3 of a MEng programme.

      The major component of this course is an engineering design exercise under the supervision of members of staff. That design will draw on elements of theory from courses currently being studied by the student. This is accompanied by lectures from practising engineers on professional aspects of engineering. Students are encouraged to attend local meetings of professional engineering societies and institutions.

      7 practice/design work undertaken in one week of concentrated study, together with some lectures throughout the half-session. Some preliminary work will be expected prior to the one week of concentrated study.

      1st Attempt: In-course assessment (100%): Project Report 80%; Oral Presentation 20%.

      Re-sit: Students who No Paper to the assessment will not be given resubmission opportunity and will be required to re-register for this course or its equivalent at the next available opportunity. All other students should be referred to the course coordinator for resubmission.

      Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

      Students must participate in all continuously assessed work and submit their reports and other work for marking when required. There will be opportunities for informal formative assessment and feedback in the meeting sessions within the design week. Informal feedback will be provided during the practical sessions. The return of marked coursework will provide formal feedback to the students.

      EG 3079
      ENGINEERING DESIGN (BEng)
      CREDIT POINTS 5

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr H Sun

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 2501

      Note(s): Available only to students in programme year 3 of a BEng programme.

      The major component of this course is an engineering design exercise under the supervision of a member of staff. That design will draw on elements of theory from courses currently being studied by the student. This is accompanied by lectures from practising engineers on professional aspects of engineering. Students are encouraged to attend local meetings of professional engineering societies and institutions.

      Seven projects of practice/design from seven subjects undertaken within one week of concentrated study, together with some lectures throughout the half-session.

      1st Attempt: In-course assessment (100%): Project Report 100%.

      Re-sit: Students who No Paper to the assessment will not be given resubmission opportunity and will be required to re-register for this course or its equivalent at the next available opportunity. All other students should be referred to the course coordinator for resubmission.

      Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

      Students must participate in all continuously assessed work and submit their reports and other work for marking when required. There will be opportunities for informal formative assessment and feedback in the meeting sessions within the design week. Informal feedback will be provided during the practical sessions. The return of marked coursework will provide formal feedback to the students.

      EG 3093
      C/C++ PROGRAMMING
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr N Kaliyaperumal

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 2504

      Note(s): Available only to candidates following an Engineering degree programme.

      1. Background history; A simple C program and explanation; Sequential execution of statements; Compiling (on UNIX and pc); Comments; Simple variables; Displaying variable values; input of variable values; formatting output;

      2. Expressions and assignments; conditional statements; true and false in C; Boolean operators; arithmetic operators.

      3. Loops using for and while; loop initialisation; loop termination; simple arrays, Pointers and addresses, local and heap storage.

      4. Functions, formal and actual arguments; scope rules; passing data by value; using pointers as arguments; recursive functions; Example: Factorial of a number.

      5. Libraries, writing maintainable code, code style, example code.

      6. Data structures, use of struct, structs that contain pointers, linked lists, stacks, FIFOs and trees.

      7. Techniques for large programs, organisation of #include files, development tools, use of version control, software test.

      8. Additional features in C++, introduction to classes, public and private members and methods. Constructors and destructors. Instantiation of classes. Static class members.

      9. Inheritance, protected members, function overloading and virtual functions. Example: use of GUI library.

      27 one-hour lectures, 10 one-hour tutorials, and 3 three-hour computer programming lab sessions in total.

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour computer based programming examination (80%); continuous assessment (20%).

      Resit: 1 three-hour computer based programming examination (100%).

      Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

      The 3 three-hour Lab exercise requires the students to submit their log books for marking at the end of each lab, in order for formative assessment and feedback to be provided.

      a) Students can receive feedback on their progress with the Course on request at the weekly tutorial/feedback sessions and at the design lab sessions.

      b) Generic exam feedback will be emailed to the whole class at their University email address.

      c) Students requesting individual feedback on their exam performance should make an appointment within 3 weeks of the publication of the exam results.

      d) Logbooks will be returned with marks and comments after each lab.

      EG 3516
      MECHANICS OF STRUCTURES
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Professor H Chandler

      Pre-requisite(s): EG2502

      Note(s): Available only to candidates following an Honours degree programme in Engineering except with the permission of the Head of School.

      The major topic of this course is an introduction to modern methods of elastic structural analysis. In this topic, direct, energy and matrix methods are jointly used to solve, initially, problems of the deformation of simple beams. The theorem of virtual work is introduced in the context of beams and frameworks.
      The rigid-plastic analysis of beams is then introduced along with the upper bound theorem and their importance to engineering design.

      24 one-hour lectures, 6 one-hour tutorials and 6 three-hour practicals in total.

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (80%); continuous assessment (20%).

      Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (80%) with the previous continuous assessment mark (20%) included in the calculation of the overall resit mark.

      Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

      A nine-week design exercise is continuously monitored and requires the students to submit their log books for marking after weeks 3 and 6, in order for formative assessment and feedback to be provided.

      • Students can receive feedback on their progress with the Course on request at the weekly tutorial/feedback sessions and at the design lab sessions.
      • Generic exam feedback will be emailed to the whole class at their University email address, or by posting on MyAberdeen.
      • Students requesting individual feedback on their exam performance should make an appointment within 3 weeks of the publication of the exam results.
      • Logbooks will be returned with marks and comments after weeks 3 and 6.

      EG 3529
      DESIGN OF STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS A
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr P C Davidson

      Pre-requisite(s):

      Co-requisite(s): EG 3516

      Note(s): Available only to candidates following an Honours degree programme in Engineering except with the permission of the Head of School.

      The course begins with concrete mix design and testing, and describes the material properties of hardened and fresh concrete. This is followed by an introduction to the principles of Limit State design. These principles are applied to the design of reinforced concrete beams in flexure and shear, as well as to axially and eccentrically loaded columns.
      The remainder of the course considers design in structural steelwork, beginning with the material itself, and the types of products it can be found in. The design of steel elements and of the connections between them is a major theme of this part of the course. It concludes with the design of composite beams and slabs for use in steel buildings.

      There is a substantial practical design exercise associated with this course. The design of a temporary steel frame office building has to be checked and recommendations made about remedial action. A brief final report is to be produced which will identify the remedial actions, outline remediation methods and appraise the risks associated with them.

      24 one-hour lectures, 6 one-hour tutorials, and 6 three-hour practicals in total.

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (80%) and in-course assessment (20%).

      EG 3537
      DYNAMICS 1A
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr E Pavlovskaia

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 2559 (CAS 9) or PX 2007

      Note(s): Available only to candidates following an Honours degree programme in Engineering except with the permission of the Head of School.

      This course commences with an overview of the dynamics of a particle and of general planar kinematics and dynamics before proceeding to a review of the free and forced vibration response of a linear single degree of freedom system. An introduction to the vibration of systems with two or more degrees of freedom follows, including natural frequencies and mode shapes, principal co-ordinates and calculation of the forced response using the impedance method. Then the dynamic forces and moments associated with rotating and reciprocating machinery are examined.

      The testing of a passive vibration absorber in the laboratory concludes the course.

      24 one-hour lectures, 6 one-hour tutorials, and 6 three-hour practicals in total.

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (80%) and in-course assessment (20%).

      EG 3538
      STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS A
      CREDIT POINTS 10

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr E Pavlovskaia

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 2559 or PX 2007

      Note(s): Available only to candidates following an Honours degree programme in Engineering except with the permission of the Head of School.

      This course commences with an overview of the dynamics of a particle and of general planar kinematics and dynamics proceeding to a review of the free and forced vibration responsse of a linear single degree of freedom system. An introduction to the vibration of systems with two or more degrees of freedom follows, including natural frequencies and mode shapes, principal co-ordinates and calculation of the forced response using the impedance method.

      16 one-hour lectures over 8 weeks, 8 one-hour tutorials and 4 three-hour practicals (as part of a major design exercise shared with other Civil Engineering courses).

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (80%) and in-course assessment (20%).

      Resit: 1 three-hour written examination paper (80%) with previous mark for in-course assessment standing.

      EG 3539
      THERMODYNAMICS 1A
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr P Davidson

      Pre-requisite(s): EG2003

      Note(s): Available only to candidates following an Honours degree programme in Engineering except with the permission of the Head of School.

      The steady flow equation features centrally during the first few weeks and many applications are done in detail. Mixtures of gases and of gases and vapours also feature as do Brayton and Rankine cycles with some emphasis on emissions.

      30 one-hour lectures, 6 one-hour tutorials and 6 three-hour practicals.

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (80%) and in-course assessment (20%).

      Resit: 1 three-hour written resit paper (80%); continuous assessment from the earlier attempt (20%)

      Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

      Solutions to tutorial solutions provided.

      Feedback provided in tutorial, lecture and workshop sessions.

      EG 3557
      ELECTRICAL POWER ENGINEERING A
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr D Jovcic

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 2559 (CAS 9).

      Note(s): Available only to candidates following an Honours degree programme in Engineering except with the permission of the Head of School.

      The course analyses the basic requirements for the generation, transmission and use of electrical energy. The per-unit notation system is introduced and its advantages in power systems highlighted. Basic approaches in the three phase and single phase AC systems analysis are introduced. Three-phase induction and synchronous machines are studied, in each case a simple equivalent circuit for the machine is derived and used to explore the operating limitations of each type of machine. Modern power conversion methods are discussed for conversion between AC and DC. This discussion includes, power electronics components used in conversion circuits and the basic topology of rectifiers, DC-DC converters and inverters. The advantages of switching conversion techniques over traditional circuits are highlighted.

      24 one-hour lectures, 12 one-hour tutorials, and 6 three-hour practicals in total.

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (80%) and in-course assessment (20%).

      EG 3560
      DIGITAL ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS A
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr D C Hendry

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 2060 (CAS 9).

      Note(s): Available only to candidates following an Honours degree programme in Engineering except with the permission of the Head of School.

      The course commences with a discussion of design principles applicable to digital systems, including specification, structured hardware design and the use of computer-aided design. Combinational logic, including minimisation, and hazards, is studied. The design of synchronous and asynchronous sequential systems is examined. An introduction to VHDL is included. Coverage is sufficient to enable students to design simple combinational and sequential circuits and to use a synthesis tool. The testing of digital systems is considered. Students also carry out a design exercise using CAD facilities.

      24 one-hour lectures, 6 one-hour tutorials, and 6 three-hour practicals in total.

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (80%) and in-course assessment (20%).

      EG 3567
      COMMUNICATIONS ENGINEERING 1A
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Prof G Fairhurst

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 2060 (CAS 9).

      Note(s): Available only to candidates following an Honours degree programme in Engineering except with the permission of the Head of School.

      The practical working of a communications network is studied together with the fundamental features required to provide a communications service. The basic concepts and terminology used in data communications are explained with reference to the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) reference model. For the Physical Layer the use of synchronous digital transmission is described. For the Link Layer the Ethernet local area network is studied, including a practical exercise to design a company network. For the Network Layer the Internet is used as an example of a wide area network. For the Transport Layer TCP and UDP protocols and the role of the transport service are discussed.

      24 one-hour lectures, 6 one-hour tutorials and 6 three-hour practicals in total.

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (80%) and in-course assessment (20%).

      EG 3570
      SEPARATION PROCESSES
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Campbell-Bannerman

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 3019; EG 3020

      Note(s): Available only to candidates following an Honours degree programme in Engineering except with the permission of the Head of School.

      Concepts of equilibrium and rated-based analysis of separation processes, and give examples of relevant separation processes, concept and analysis of a unit operation as applied to separation processes, analysis of relevant separation processes by applying mass and energy balance methods, evaporation processes of liquid without and with boiling point rise, vapour liquid equilibrium, phase rule and relative volatility, equilibrium or flash distillation and single batch or differential distillation processes, distillation towers and their calculation methods, adsorption and calculation method, liquid-liquid extraction and the basic processes.

      3 one-hour lectures per week, 1 one-hour tutorial per week, 3 weeks of laboratory class.

      1st attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (80%) and continuous assessment (20%).

      Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (100%).

      EG 3575
      UNIT OPERATIONS
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr E J Bain

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 3019; EG 3020; EG 3078 / EG 3079

      Note(s): Available only to candidates following an Honours degree programme in Engineering except with the permission of the Head of School.

      Storage of liquefied gas; design, operation and safety. Heat transfer via radiation. Heat transfer to the gas phase. Quench cooling. Design/specification of compression trains. Design of condensers/evaporators. Plate heat exchangers. Design of distillation processes. PINCH technology. Introduction to process control. Heat transfer in agitated vessels.

      27 one-hour lectures, 12 one-hour tutorials. Laboratory/site visits as available/required.

      1st attempt: 1 three-hour examination (50%) and continuous assessment (50%).

      Resit: 1 three-hour written examination.

      EG 3586
      ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT I - INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING, SUPPLY CHAIN AND SAFETY MANAGEMENT A
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Mr J Cavanagh

      Pre-requisite(s): None

      Co-requisite(s): None

      Note(s): Available only to candidates following an Honours degree programme in Engineering except with the permission of the Head of School.

      The course provides students with a broad ranging introduction to Engineering Management which should enable them to perform effectively as graduate engineers and in later more senior roles with broader ranging responsibilities. The course provides a brief introduction to risk, safety management, economics, organisations, management accounting, human resource management, contract/competition law and supply chain management. It also covers key professional skills such as time management, communication, teamwork and presentation of data. It concludes with a discussion of how one might go about setting a project up for success which students should find useful when embarking on individual and group projects at levels 4 and 5

      Three hours of lectures and a one hour tutorial each week.

      1st Attempt: One two-hour written examination (65%) plus continuous assessment (35%). The particulars of continually assessed assignments will be outlined at the start of the course and published on WebCT.

      Resit: One two-hour written examination (65%) plus continuous assessment (35%). For students who are unable to pass the course by taking a resit due to poor results in in-course assessment, the course must be retaken in its entirety.


      EG 3593
      RESERVOIR ENGINEERING 1 - FUNDAMENTALS
      CREDIT POINTS 15

      Course Co-ordinator: Dr C Sands

      Pre-requisite(s): GL2512 and only available to students registered for BEng or MEng Petroleum programmes.

      Co-requisite(s): Per Geology for engineers.

      Below is an indicative outline of the course content:

      (1) Reservoir Fluids Properties (8 hours)
      Nomenclature and units. Reservoir, separator and surface conditions. Classification of reservoirs. PVT and phase behaviour of reservoir fluids. Physical and Chemical properties of Liquids and Gases. Hydrocarbon Reserve Estimation (calculation of hydrocarbon volumes, recovery factor, etc). Introduction to production mechanisms (primary and improved recovery).

      (2) Reservoir Rock Properties (4 Hours)
      Porosity. Permeability. Wettability. Saturation. Releative permeability.

      (3) Flow in Porous Media (12 hours)
      Diffusivity equation. Flow regimes. Linear flow and redial flow. Darcy's law. Flow of gases in porous media. Multi-phase flow.

      The course consists of 24 hours lectures. 12 one-hour tutorials and 12 hours equivalent lab or field based practicals.

      1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (80%) and continuous assessment - report on field trips (20%).

      Resit: Examination (100%).

      EG 3723
      FIELD SURVEY AND ENGINEERING HYDROLOGY FIELD COURSE A
      CREDIT POINTS 5

      Course Co-ordinator: Mrs N Nikora

      Pre-requisite(s): EG 3027

      Co-requisite(s): None

      Note(s):

      (i) Available only to students following an Engineering degree programme. (ii) The field work aspects of this course may pose difficulties to some students with disabilities. If this arises alternative arrangements will be made available, eg surveying exercises can be done on campus and engineering hydrology exercise can be done in the Fluids Research lab. Any student wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator. (iii) Students will be required to contribute towards the cost of their accommodation during the field course.

      The course is residential. Prior to the start of the field elements of the course, students are given introductory lectures to familiarise themselves with the instruments used on the course. The students need to complete four surveying exercises: levelling, curve setting, traversing and engineering hydrology. Small groups of students are assigned one task per day.
      During the course, students carry out:

      • A detailed survey of a specified land area. This provides experience in the use of a wide variety of surveying instruments for the measurement of angles, heights and lengths, as well as in standard recording procedures, error distribution and accurate plotting methods. All the usual techniques of land surveying, including levelling, theodolite traversing and setting out are covered.
      • A detailed survey of a waterway including discharge measurements. This provides experience in the use of hydrological and surveying equipment for the measurements of cross-sections, flow velocities, water surface levels and slopes, as well as in standard recording procedures and various hydrological and hydraulic computation methods.

        5-6 days residential course to include lectures and practical work. The course will be held during the Easter Vacation.

        1st Attempt: In-course assessment (100%).
        Resit: None

         

        > Level 4

        PLEASE NOTE: Resit: (for Honours students only): Candidates achieving a CAS mark of 6-8 may be awarded compensatory level 1 credit. Candidates achieving a CAS mark of less than 6 will be required to submit themselves for re-assessment and should contact the Course Co-ordinator for further details.

        EG 4011
        ENGINEERING PROJECT ABROAD (BEng)
        CREDIT POINTS 60

        Course Co-ordinator: Mrs N Nikora

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3079

        Note(s): (i) Available only to candidiates following a BEng degree programme in year 4. (ii) Students are expected to do some preliminary work, under the direction of a nominated supervisor at Aberdeen, during the first half-session to prepare themselves for undertaking a project abroad. In particular, this involves establishing contact with a supervisor in the host institution (who will have been nominated by the co-ordinator in the host institution) and defining a project specification in consultation with the host supervisor. All of the credit points for this course are associated with the second half-session. Every student is allocated an individual engineering project which is supervised by a member of the academic staff from both institutions. The project will normally be in the student’s area of professional interest

        Every student is allocated an individual engineering project which is supervised by a member of the academic staff from both institutions. The project will normally be in the student’s area of professional interest. Projects are of wide variety: theoretical, computational, design, experimental, review and field work. In all cases aspects of project planning and written communication are included.

        No formal teaching.

        1st Attempt: In-course assessment (100%).

        Resit: None.

        EG 4012
        ENGINEERING PROJECT (BEng)
        CREDIT POINTS 45

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr Y Guo, Dr A Allen, Dr A J Starkey, Dr M Campbell-Bannerman, Dr J Ing.

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3079

        Note(s): (i) Available only to students in programme year 4 of a BEng programme. (ii) This course is spread over both half-sessions. The student effort expected is that of 15 credit points in the first half session and 30credit points in the second half-session.

        Every student is allocated an individual engineering project which is supervised by a member of the academic staff. The project will normally be in the student’s area of professional interest.

        Projects are of a wide variety: theoretical, computational, design, experimental, review and field work. In all cases aspects of project planning, written communication, and oral presentation are included.

        Equivalent to 10 weeks full time.

        1st Attempt: In-course assessment (100%).

        Resit: None.

        EG 40FD
        ELECTRICAL MACHINES AND DRIVES
        CREDIT POINTS 10

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr K Ahmed

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3557

        This course examines the performance and control of electrical machines and drives. Transient performance of various electrical machines (induction, synchronous and DC) is discussed using two-axis-machine theory. Steady state performance is also considered. Simulation techniques are used as appropriate in studying both transient and steady state performance of the electrical machines and drives.

        Medium and high-performance AC drives are considered, including V/f and vector control drives. Modern AC machine control in rotating DQ co-ordinate frame is studied in some detail. DC machine drives (thyristor-controlled and transistor-controlled drives) are discussed and analysed.

        24 one-hour lectures and 12 one-hour tutorials.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (90%); course assessment (10%).

        EG 40GA
        COMPUTER AND SOFTWARE ENGINEERING
        CREDIT POINTS 10

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr F. Verdicchio

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3560

        Software Engineering - the course studies the application of formal techniques to the development of software - including requirements specifications, functional specifications, design documents and the acceptance test procedures. The concepts of quality of service, quality assuranc, validation and verification and correct by construction techniques, as applied to the specification, design and development of software, are introduced.

        Computer Engineering - the course studies the impact that the application domain, operating systems, technology, high-level languages, compilers and economic perspectives have on computer architecture.

        2 one-hour lectures per week and a total of 11 two-hour laboratory sessions/tutorials.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (80%) and in-course assessment (20%).

        EG 40GD
        COMMUNICATIONS ENGINEERING 2
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Prof G Fairhurst

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3567

        The course provides an overview of communications, with an analysis of signals and systems emphasising the role of Fourier transformation and linear filtering in communications. Pulse code modulation and related techniques for analogue to digital conversion are covered. Modulation techniques for both analogue and digital signals are discussed as well as the problems caused by intersymbol interference in data communication. A review of probability theory, is followed by a study of random processes with emphasis on the characterisation of wide band stationary processes and narrow band Gaussian processes. The effects of noise on amplitude and angle modulated signals are covered. There is a discussion of optimum receivers for data transmission, developing an understanding of the matched filter.

        3 one-hour lectures per week and a total of 9 one-hour tutorials.

        1st Attempt: Course assessment (20%), 1 three-hour written examination (80%).

        EG 40HA
        CHEMICAL REACTION ENGINEERING
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr E J Bain

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3019, EG 3020

        Co-requisite(s): N/A.

        Reactor Design - General Principles:

        - Basic objectives in design of a reactor
        - Batch reactors
        - Tubular flow reactors
        - Continuous stirred-tank reactors
        - Comparison of batch, tubular and CSTR reactors for a single reaction
        - Comparison of batch, tubular and CSTR for multiple reactions

        3 one-hour lectures per week
        1 one-hour tutorial per week
        2 three-hour laboratory sessions

        1st attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (80%); continuous assessment (20%).

        Resit: 1 three-hour written examination.

        EG 40HB
        CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SYSTEMS
        CREDIT POINTS 10

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr J C Jones

        Pre-requisite(s): EG3575

        Note(s): Available only to candidates following an Engineering degree programme.

        The basis concepts of systems engineering are introduced and the idea of combining unit operations into larger modules and plants discussed. Plant design operates under a number of constraints, which in turn affect specific unit-operation design decisions. Availability of utilities, manpower, raw materials and transportation network are considered. The environmental constraints on chemical engineering systems are considered for both aqueous and vapour/gas systems and models developed to quantify release dispersion. The properties of fires and explosions are covered, with numerical models again developed. Fire and explosion considerations of plant layout are examined and solutions developed. Wider plant safety systems and regulations covering plant operation both offshore and on-shore installations discussed including the use of hazard and operability studies (HAZOP). The learning developed is applied in a plant design problem for which a technical report is produced.

        22 hours of lectures; 6 one-hour tutorials; 2 three-hour workshop sessions.

        1st attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (80%); continuous assessment (20%)

        Resit: The resit mark will be made up of 1 three-hour written examination (80%), and in-course assessment mark from the 1st attempt (20%)

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        Solutions to tutorial solutions provided.

        Feedback provided in tutorial, lecture & workshop sessions.

        EG 40HC
        PROCESS CONTROL
        CREDIT POINTS 10

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Kiefer

        Pre-requisite(s): EG3020 EG3575

        Note(s): Available only to candidates following an Engineering degree programme.

        This course focuses on the fundamental principles of control theory and the practice of automatic process control. The dynamic behaviour of process plants is reviewed and the need for the control established. The properties of stochastic processes are introduced. The basic concepts involved in process control are then introduced, including the elements of control systems, feedback/forward control, block diagrams, and transfer functions. The mathematical techniques required for the analysis of process control are covered, focussing on Laplace Transform analysis, before students begin to develop simple control loops for first order systems. Development to more general situations is made through the study of second order systems and the application of compensation including PID control. The control theory developed is applied to a range of chemical engineering problems using simulation tools. The random nature of process disturbances is then introduced into the control loop behaviour to study the effect of dynamics systems. Students complete a case study which is marked as part of the continuous assessment element of the course.

        24 one-hour lectures, 6 one-hour tutorials and 3 two-hour practicals in total

        1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination paper (80%), and continuous assessment (20%) made up from the following two elements:

        • Laboratory logbook and completed Matlab exercises
        • Group Case Study Report

        Resit: Where a resit is offered, the mark reported will be 1 two-hour written examination (80%), and in-course assessment mark from the 1st attempt (20%)

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        Solutions to tutorial solutions provided.

        Students are expected to ask for feedback on their level of understanding at the weekly feedback/tutorial sessions.
        Tutorial questions will be handed in and marked each week.
        There will be a scheduled session for feedback on the exams within 4 weeks of the publication of exam results. Students requiring feedback on the exam should make appointments within this session to see the Course Coordinator.

        EG 40JE
        GEOTECHNICS 2
        CREDIT POINTS 10

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Ivanovic

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3027

        The course applies the principles of soil and rock mechanics gained in the pre-requisite course to the design of piles and piled foundations, earth pressure and retaining walls, stability of slopes and the design of open excavations. The course examines in particular groundwater and its influence on geotechnical problems. States of stress and strain in soils are also examined in detail including the concepts of stress paths and invariants and the three dimensional critical state model.

        2 one-hour lectures per week and a total of 6 one-hour tutorials.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (90%) and continuous assessment (10%).

        EG 40JF
        CIVIL ENGINEERING HYDRAULICS
        CREDIT POINTS 10

        Course Co-ordinator: Professor T O’Donoghue

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3013

        Note(s): May not be included with EG 40DB in a minimum curriculum.

        The course begins with consideration of boundary layer development over a flat plate and curved surfaces, leading to boundary layer separation and forces on immersed bodies. This is followed by study of water wave theory with particular application to coastal and offshore engineering. The second part of the course is broadly concerned with the behaviour and management of rivers. The mechanics of open channel flow are first addressed with emphasis on gradually varied flow and the determination of stage-discharge relationships for man-made and natural channels. This is followed by consideration of fundamental aspects of sediment transport, including threshold criteria and the calculation of bed load and suspended load transport.

        2 one-hour lectures per week and a total of 6 one-hour tutorials.

        1st Attemp: 1 three-hour written examination paper (90%) and continuous assessment (10%).

        EG 40JG
        ADVANCED STRUCTURAL DESIGN
        CREDIT POINTS 10

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr P C Davidson

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3529

        The course divides into three main topics. The first topic will introduce, in some detail, the principles involved in the analysis and design of pre-stressed concrete members. The second topic will cover the design of industrial buildings and multi-storey commercial buildings using structural steelwork. The third topic introduces the main features associated with the design of masonry and timber structures.

        2 one-hour lectures per week and a total of 11 one-hour tuturials.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (90%) and continuous assessment (10%).

        EG 40JH
        ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr M S Imbabi

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3516 and EG 3529

        This course extends the basic stiffness method of analysis developed in the prerequisite courses. The fundamental principles of the stiffness method of analysis, with automatic assembly of the stiffness matrix for rigid jointed plane frames and space structures, are presented in some detail. Elastic instability of frames, and the design of continuous steel beams and portal frames using plastic methods will be undertaken. The analysis of flat plates and slabs using yield line theory, and an introduction to shells will also be covered. The course concludes with a brief outline of the finite element method of analysis, with computer-based applications forming an important practical component.

        3 one-hour lectures per week and a total of 6 tutorials.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (90%) and continuous assessment (10%).

        EG 40JI
        ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr Y Guo

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3013

        The first part of the course is concerned with water pollution and main aspects of public health engineering. The following topics are covered: water quality characteristics, water supply and treatment, sources of water pollution and modelling of their impacts on aqueous environment, wastewater treatment.

        In the second part of the course, sustainable land management is introduced, including management of: groundwater and solid waste.

        The third part of the course provides an introduction to air pollution and control. It includes sources and effects of micro and macro air pollution and air pollution control techniques.

        3 one-hour lectures per week and a total of 9 one-hour tutorials.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (90%); continuous assessment (class test) (10%).

        EG 40JJ
        FLUID DYNAMICS
        CREDIT POINTS 10

        Course Co-ordinator: Professor T O'Donoghue

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3013

        The course begins with study of water wave theory with particular application to coastal and offshore engineering. This is followed by consideration of boundary layer development over a flat plate and curved surfaces, leading to boundary layer separation and forces on immersed bodies. These topics are also part of the EG40CB Civil Engineering Hydraulics course. The second part of the course concentrates on compressible flow. Using the fundamental conservation equations, the characteristics of converging-diverging nozzles and accelerating supersonic flows are examined. Plane and oblique shock waves and Prandtl-Meyer flow are then introduced. The course concludes with a discussion of the behaviour of transonic aerofoils, and the design of supersonic engine inlets.

        2 one-hour lectures per week and a total of 6 one-hour tutorials.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (90%) and continuous assessment (10%).

        EG 40JK
        THERMODYNAMICS 2
        CREDIT POINTS 10

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr Y Guo

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3536

        Conduction: Fourier's Law applied to steady and non-steady conditions.
        Convection: Forced and natural.
        Radiation heat transfer: The Stefan-Boltzmann Law, view factors, the summation and reciprocity rules.
        Heat exchangers: Mode of operation and design calculations.

        2 one-hour lectures per week and 6 tutorials in total.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour examination paper (90%); continuous assessment (class test) (10%).

        EG 40JL
        ADVANCED ENGINEERING MATERIALS
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Kashtalyan

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 2028 or EG 2029

        Co-requisite(s): None.

        1. Basic concepts and characteristics of composite materials. Advantages and limitations of composites. Types and classifications of composites. Applications of composites. Constituent materials and their properties. Fibres and their properties. Fibre architecture. Particles and whiskers. Matrices and their properties. Reinforcement-matrix interface. (4 lectures - Dr M Kashtalyan).

        2.Manufacturing of fibrous composites. Polymer matrix composites. Metal matrix composites. Ceramic matrix composites. (2 lectures - Dr M Kashtalyan).

        3. Determination of stiffness properties of unidirectional fibre-reinforced composite material using mechanics of materials. Failure of unidirectional fibre-reinforced composite material under different types of loading. Damage mechanisms, damage accumulation, damage tolerance. Design philosophies for composite materials. (6 lectures - Dr M Kashtalyan).

        4.Stress-strain relations for unidirectional fibre-reinforced composite material.

        Relationships between stiffness, compliances and engineering constants. Stress-strain relations for thin lamina. Off-axis loading of unidirectional lamina. Transformation of stress and strain. Transformation of elastic and engineering constants for thin lamina. (6 lectures - Dr M Kashtalyan).

        5. Strenght of unidirectional lamina. Macromechanical strength parameters and failure theories. (2 lectures - Dr M Kashtalyan).

        6. Lamination theory of multidirectional composite laminates. Basic assumptions. Stress and strain variation in a laminate. Resultant forces and moments. General load-deformation relations. Inversion of load-deformation relations. Special classes of laminates: symmetric, antisymmetric, quasi-isotropic. Laminate engineering properties. (6 lectures - Dr M Kashtalyan).

        7. Failure analysis of multidirectional laminates. Types of failure. Stress analysis and safety factors for first-ply failure. Design of methodology for structural composite materials. (4 lectures - Dr M Kashtalyan).

        30 one-hour lectures and 6 tutorials in total.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (90%) and continuous assessment (10%).

        Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (90%), continuous assessment (10%).

        EG 40JM
        DYNAMICS 2
        CREDIT POINTS 10

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr R D Neilson

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3535

        The course will commence with an overview of Lagrange’s equations of motion as an alternative formulation to Newton’s equations. Subsequently, the axial and torsional vibration of rods and lateral vibration of strings and beams will be examined with techniques presented for the calculation of the free vibration, normal modes and natural frequencies and forced response. The final part of the course will be an introduction to the vibration of non-linear systems with a qualitative description of non-linear effects, and quantitative evaluation of the influence of small non-linearities on a single degree of freedom vibrating systems using perturbation procedures and simulation. A short overview of instability in single degree of freedom systems will be presented.

        2 one-hour lectures per week and a total of 6 one-hour tutorials.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (90%) and continuous assessment (10%).

        EG 40JO
        SIGNAL PROCESSING
        CREDIT POINTS 10

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Harrigan

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3052

        This course introduces basic digital signal processing theory, with a special emphasis on digital filters. Topics covered include discrete time system analysis, Z transforms, DTFT’s, FFT’s convolution and correlation. The course looks at new trends in DSP architecture including DSP processors. A special study is made of discrete-time linear phase filters. The application of phase-locked loops to the solution of signal processing problems is discussed, and, in particular, the use of PLLs in domestic TV circuits is examined. The recovery of chrominance sub-carrier signals and the tracking of trains of pulses used to trigger the line timebase of TV receivers is studied.

        2 one-hour lectures per week and a total of 6 one-hour tutorials. 1 three-hour written examination paper.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (90%) and continuous assessment (10%).

        EG 40JQ
        SAFETY AND RELIABILITY ENGINEERING
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr S Sriramula

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3583 or EG 3584

        The course includes three main topic areas. The first is the general theory of reliability, covering problem formulation and the use of methods such as FORM and Monte Carlo simulation. Applications include failure of structural and mechanical components, tolerance problems, failure by fatigue and the evaluation of safety factors for routine design.

        The second topic is fire safety, including ignition, combustion and extinguishment of cellulosic and hydrocarbon fires, and the use of active and passive methods of fire protection. Applications include fires in buildings and in offshore oil and gas production.

        The third main topic is an introduction to Safety Management and Human Reliability including Safety Management Systems.

        3 one-hour lectures per week and a total of 9 one-hour tutorials.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (90%) and continuous assessment (10%).

        EG 40JR
        OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr B Wang

        Pre-requisite(s):

      • Field development and project organisation

      • Offshore vessels and production facilities

      • Drilling and well finishing

      • Up- and downstream processing

      • Essential personnel and roles

      • Safety systems
      • Two hours of lectures and one hour tutorial per week.

        1st Attempt: Final closed book exam (90%) and continuous assessment (10%).

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        EG 40JS
        RESERVOIR ENGINEERING II - PERFORMANCE AND MODELLING
        CREDIT POINTS 10

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr C Sands

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3593 Reservoir Engineering I - Fundamentals

        Co-requisite(s): None.

        Below is an indicative outline of the course content:
        (1) Reservoir Performance Prediction (Material balance) (8 hours)

        • Material Balance: Conservation of mass and volume

        • Gas reservoirs

        • Oil reservoirs

        • Accuracy of material balance equation

        • Fluid displacement models: Immiscible displacement calculations

        • Recovery factor

        • Microscopic, vertical and areal sweep efficiencies

        • Stratified reservoirs

        • Decline curves: Exponential, hyperbolic, Fetkovich decline curve analysis. Ranges of validity Streamline simulators

        (2) Integration into Reservoir Model (4 hours) - Geostatics. Object-based and Pixel-based models for reservoir characterisation. Multi-disciplinary data integration. The do's and don't of uncertainty quantification.
        • Geostatics

        • Object-based and Pixel-based models for reservoir characterisation

        • Multidisciplinary data integration

        • The Do's and Don't's of uncertainty quantification

        Numerical simulators (6 hours) - Theoretical background, types of models and their uses, Data sources and treatment in the simulator, limitations, practical considerations.
        • Reservoir models

        • Equations and terminology

        • Simulation models

        • Grid systems

        • Rock properties

        • Model relative permeability

        • Model capillary pressure

        • Fluid properties adn experiments

        • Model fluid properties

        • Aquifer treatment

        • Model well and production data

        • Tutorials

        Practical use of simulators (6 hours) - Introduction to the practical use of reservoir numerical simulators, build and execution of simulation models using basic Eclipse 100 facilities.
        • Eclipse features

        • File organisation and structure

        • Grids

        • Fluid properties

        • Rock properties

        • Wells

        • Aquifer modelling

        • History matching

        • Prediction

        The course consists of 24 hours lectures, 6 one-hour tutorials and 2 practical sessions.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (80%) and continuous assessment (20%).

        Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (100%).

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        EG 40JT
        DRILLING AND WELL ENGINEERING
        CREDIT POINTS 10

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Ing

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3593 - Reservoir Engineering 1: Fundamentals

        Co-requisite(s): None.

        Below is an indicative outline of the course content:

          Well Construction (Drilling and Completion) (24 hours) - oilfield drilling, well engineering, well design, and drilling safety, well design and oilfield drilling, techniques and designs for completing wells, potential well and reservoir problems associated with production, solutions and completion strategies to overcome these production problems

        • Oilfield drilling

        • Drilling safety

        • Well engineering

        • Well design

        • Completing wells

        • Production

        The course consists of 24 one-your lectures, 6 one-hour tutorials and 2 practical sessions.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (80%) and continuous assessment (20%).

        Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (100%).

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        EG 40JU
        PETROLEUM PRODUCTION ENGINEERING AND ECONOMICS
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Ing

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3593 Reservoir Engineering 1 - Fundamentals

        Co-requisite(s): None.

        Below is an indicative outline of the course content:

        • Production Engineering / Well performance (24 hours) - Essentials of the behaviour of the vapour/liquid mixtures in the wellbore and the necessary calculations, analysis and evaluation of the productivity and performance of wells including a summary of multiphase vertical flow correlations and artificial lift systems.

        • Flow of fluids into the wellbore

        • Single and multi-phase fluid flow in pipes

        • Productivity Index (PI) and Inflow Performance Relationships (IPR) for oil and gas wells

        • Nodal analysis

        • Gas condensate wells

        • Complex wells

        • Well deliverability for oil and gas wells

        • Artificial lift systems

        • Multi-phase flow measurement and metering

        • Oil Field chemistry - scaling and corrosion

        • Production enhancement by formation stimulation - eg. acidising, fracturing, etc.

        • Phenomenon of secondary mineral growth and related destruction of porosity and permeability - to be related to the (geo)chemistry of formation water.

        • Economics (12 hours) - Basic concepts relating to asset and project assessment and valuation: volumetrics, risk, uncertainty, discounted cash flow analysis, NPVs/EMVs and decision making.

        • Capex and Opex

        • Future Cash Flows

        • Measures of Financial Performance

        • Effects of Phased and Incremental Projects

        • Leasing and Outsourcing

        • General Frameworks for Taxation (This will include Concession Agreements)

        • Probabilistic and Monte-Carlo models

        • Decision theory and Criteria

        • External Financing and Loans

        • Future Markets

        • Relationships between reserves and economics (costs and oil price / revenue)

        The course consists of a 36 one-hour lectures, 6 one-hour tutorials and 2 practical sessions.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (80%) and continuous assessment (20%).

        Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (100%).

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        EG 4513
        INDIVIDUAL PROJECT ABROAD (MEng)
        CREDIT POINTS 60

        Course Co-ordinator: Mrs N Nikora

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3078

        Co-requisite(s): None

        Note(s): Available only to students following the MEng degree programme in year 4.

        Every student is allocated an individual engineering project, which is supervised by a member of the academic staff from both institutions. The project will normally be in the student's area of professional interest. Projects are of wide variety: theoretical, computational, design, experimental, review and field work. In all cases aspects of project planning, written and oral communication are included.

        No formal teaching. Students are expected to progress with the course by directed and self-directed study, self learning development, and interactions and exchanges with supervisors. Informal teaching is given via regular meetings/emails with supervisors from both institutions.

        1st Attempt: in-course assessment: TContinuous assessment (100%). This comprises: thesis (70%); institution report from the host institution concerning the conduct of the project (15%) oral presentation (15%).

        Resit: None.

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        Students may submit a draft table of contents and the draft of one chapter of the thesis to the supervisor for comment. Students may also discuss technical and style aspects with the supervisor. They may also seek advice on the oral presentation.

        Students can receive individual feedback on their progress with the course on request at the weekly meetings with supervisor/feedback sessions. Students requiring individual feedback on their submitted thesis and/or oral presentation should make an appointment within 2 weeks of the publication of their results.

        EG 4515
        INDIVIDUAL PROJECT (MEng)
        CREDIT POINTS 45

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr Y Guo, Dr A Allen, Dr A J Starkey

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3078

        Co-requisite(s): None.

        Note(s): (i) Available only to students in programme year 4 of an MEng programme. (ii) A full-time student undertakes this course in the second half-session. The timing for a part-time student is determined on an individual case basis.

        Every student is allocated an individual engineering research project which is supervised by a member of the academic staff. The project will normally be in the student's area of professional interest. Projects are of a wide variety and may include theoretical, computational, design, experimental, review and field work. In all cases aspects of project planning, written communication and oral presentation are included.

        1st Attempt: Thesis (80%), oral presentation (20%).

        Resit: None.

        EG 4516
        ENGINEERING PROJECT B (BENG)
        CREDIT POINTS 45

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Akisanya

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3079 Engineering Design (BEng)

        Co-requisite(s): None.

        Note(s): This course is only available to students in programme year 4 of a BEng programme for which individual project is required to be carried out primarily in the second half-session.

        Every student is allocated an individual project which is supervised by an academic member of staff. The project will normally be in the student's area of professional interest. Projects are of a wide variety: theoretical, computational, design and experimental. In all cases, aspects of project planning, written communication and presentation are included.

        Students are expected to meet with their supervisor on a weekly basis.

        1st Attempt: Continuous assessment: Thesis (80%); Oral and/or Poster Presentation (20%).

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        EG 4570
        ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT II - ENGINEERING PROJECT MANAGEMENT, LEADERSHIP AND TEAMWORK
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Mr J Cavanagh

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3586

        Note(s): Available only to students in programme year 4 of a BEng or MEng programme or with the permission of the head of Engineering.

        The course is essentially an introduction to project management and is aimed at engineering students who expect to be working in a project related environment or are considering a potential career in project management. To course provides students with an insight into the purpose, principals, fundamental concepts and strategies of Project Management including both leadership and teamwork. Whilst it does cover areas such as planning and estimating it is NOT intended to prepare students for such roles.

        1 three-hour lecture and 1 one-hour tutorial each week.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (80%), continuous assessment (20%).

        Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (80%) and in-course assessment (20%) carried forward. For students who are unable to pass the course by taking a resit due to poor results in in-course assessment, the course must be retaken in its entirety.

        EG 4578
        GROUP DESIGN PROJECT (BENG)
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr E Pavlovskaia

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3079

        Note(s): Available only to students in programme year 4 of a BEng programme or with the permission of the Head of Engineering.

        The course is a concentrated design and reporting exercise which requires application of project management and team liaison skills in addition to technical design ability. Specific exercises will include interdisciplinary aspects and will relate to design requirements arising from the professional activities of the Engineering Department with School of Engineering or its industrial contacts. Written and oral presentations form part of the course.

        3 weeks full-time.

        1st Attempt: In-course assessment: Project management and teamwork (20%); technical performance (40%); formal report (40%).

         

        > Level 5
        EG 5046
        OPTICAL SYSTEMS AND SENSING
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Prof J Watson

        Pre-requisite(s): EG2028 oe EG2029 or PX2505 and EG2069; all at CAS 9 or PX3009

        1. Introduction to concepts of optical systems engineering; brief outline of general ideas; overview of course objectives and content; where optical engineering fits into other branches of engineering
        2. Review of nature and behaviour of light; review of optical properties of materials, semi-conductors, and pn junctions.
        3. Fundamental laser principles: stimulated and spontaneous emission, population inversion, amplification of light, three-and-four-level laser systems; optical resonant cavities; power output; optimum output coupling.
        4. Laser systems: general laser properties; gas-lasers and detailed discussion of HeNe, argon-ion and CO2 systems; solid state lasers and detailed discussion of ruby and Nd-YAG lasers; pumping networks. Other relevant laser systems
        5. Semi-conductor lasers and LED's: injection luminescence in a pn junction, direct and indirect band gaps; LED's, laser diodes; homojunction and hetrojunction structures, laser diode arrays; diode-pumped lasers; design of laser driver circuits.
        6. Laser safety: Introduction to concepts of laser safety; outline of European laser safety standard and its interpretation; outline of laser safety calculations for typical lasers and systems.
        7. Photodetectors: performance characteristics; semiconductor detectors, LDR's and junction detectors; photoconductive and photovoltaic modes; circuit design; imaging detectors, diode arrays; CCD and CMOS sensors; modern digital cameras and video-cameras
        8. Radiometry and light coupling: basic optics; radiometric and photometric quantities; spatial radiation profiles; concepts of light transfer; direct and indirect coupling of light; light coupling calculations; fibre light guides; numerical aperture of fibres; types of fibre; fibre bandwidth and attenuation; coupling into fibres.
        9. Outline and discussion of typical applications of optical engineering in science and industry. These will be presented as case studies and will draw out the main engineering decisions and component choices made in their implementation (e.g. choice of source, detector, and performance required). The case studies will include some of the following: design of a diode-pumped laser for subsea application; outline of a fibre-optic communication link; design of a fibre sensor for use in a typical industrial application (e.g. current measurement in a transmission line); holography and applications in remote particle sizing and interferometry; materials processing and laser welding and cutting; particle image velocimetry (PIV); laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of steel.

        30 one hour lectures (to be arranged) and 6 one hour tutorials (to be arranged)

        1st attempt: 1 three hour written exam (80%) and continuous assessment (20%).

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        Students can receive feedback on their progress with the Course on request at the bi-weekly tutorial/feedback sessions.

        Students requesting feedback on their exam performance should make an appointment during the scheduled feedback session which will be announced within 4 weeks of the publication of the exam result.

        EG 5056
        STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS 2
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr R D Neilson

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3538 Structural Dynamics

        The course will commence with a brief review of the free and steady state forced motion of single and multi-degree of freedom systems. Methods for the calculation of the transient response of single and multi-degree of freedom systems are then introduced. The modelling of earthquake, wind and wave loading of structures is described along with the use of shock spectra to quantify the response. Matlab examples are introduced as a means of calculating the transient response of SDOF and MDOF systems. Subsequently, the axial and torsional vibration of rods and lateral vibration of strings and beams will be examined with techniques presented for the calculation of normal modes and natural frequencies, free and forced vibration response. The Rayleigh-Ritz method is presented as a means of finding the first natural frequency of a non-uniform beam. The final part of the course will be an introduction to the vibration of non-linear systems with a qualitative description of non-linear effects, and quantitative evaluation of the influence of small nonlinearities on single degree of freedom vibration.

        24 one-hour lectures and 6 tutorials, in total.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (80%); continuous assessment (20%).

        1 three-hour written examination (80%) with the mark from the first attempt from the continuous assessment (20%).

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        Feedback will be provided to students on their work in tutorials and on their continuous assessment assignment. Continuous assessment feedback will be given within 3 weeks of submission.

        EG 5085
        ADVANCED TOPICS FOR MEng STUDY
        CREDIT POINTS 30

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr R D Neilson

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 4515 or EG 4513

        Co-requisite(s): None

        Note(s): (i) Available only to students in programme year 5 of an MEng programme or with the permission of the Head of Engineering. (ii) A full-time student undertakes this course in the first half-session. The timing for a part-time student is determined on an individual case basis.

        The course comprises two exercises which involve in depth technical self-study on a topic related to the MEng specialism of individual students. The exercise may take the form of, for example, an intelligent synthesis of published material on a topic, critical analysis of literature, comparison of methods of analysis or back analysis of case studies. The first exercise is examined by continuous. The second exercise is examined by continous asssessment and by conference presentation.

        1 hour tutorial per week.

        1st Attempt: 1 paper (30%), 1 paper (50%) and 1 conference presentation (20%).

        The two papers should describe the student’s findings on two distinct technical exercises. Students are encouraged to pursue and demonstrate technical depth in the conduct of the exercises. The assessment of the papers will emphasise those aspects of the exercise assosiated with technical depth.

        EG 5090
        MATHEMATICAL OPTIMISATION
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Starkey

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3006

        1. General techniques of mathematical optimisation and minimisation: Methods for one variable: Newton's method; Fibonacci search: Golden-section search; Curve fitting approaches using Quadratic interpolation, Cubic interpolation; Brent's method. Methods for many variables: Direct search methods using Hooke and Jeeves' method, Downhill simplex (Nelder and Mead's) method: Gradient methods using the method of steepest descent, Quadratic functions, Newton-Raphson method, Conjugate directions, Fletcher-Reeves method, Davidson-Fletcher-Powell method. Constrained Optimisation: Equality constraints, Inequality constraints, Convexity and Concavity.

        2. Discipline specific applications: Modelling data using Non-linear least squares, Levenberg-Marquardt algorthm. Local and global optimisation using Simulated annealing, Genetic algorithms; Inverse problems; Regularisation: Applications of Local and global optimisation: simulated annealing and genetic algorithms in engineering problem solving procedures. Other Applications specific to engineering disciplines.

        2 one-hour lectures, 1 one-hour tutorial and 1 one-hour computer application session per week.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (100%).

        EG 5095
        SOLID MECHANICS AND MATERIALS MODELLING
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr O Menshykov

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3006

        Note(s): A range of techniques for analysing the mechanical behaviour of continuous and heterogeneous materials and structures is studied. Fundamental equations of solid and fluid mechanics are re-examined and a unified treatment of elasticity and flow of Newtonian fluids is given. The solution of Navier's equation of elasticity and Navier-Stokes equation for Newtonian fluids using the extremum method is discussed. The examples of non-linear and non-elastic constitutive equations are examined. The manufacturing of heterogeneous materials, their classification and use in construction are reviewed, with the particular focus on the emerging class of nanomaterials and nanotechnologies. The stress strain relations for different types of heterogeneous materials and their applications to the assessment of fracture and damage tolerance of heterogeneous engineering structures are presented. The compressive behaviour of direction-specific materials and the phenomenon of internal instability are discussed. The standard approaches to design of composite structures are introduced to the students. The joining technologies for fibre reinforced plastics and metal matrix composites are compared. The concept of multi-scale modelling of materials and structures is outlined.

        Continuum Mechanics

        1. Mathematical foundations.
        Intorduction to Cartesian tensors: Summation conventions and alternating tensor; transformation of coordinates and tensor transformation laws; tensor algebra and tensor calculus; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; invariants of second order tensors. Tensor fields: divergence theorem of Gauss and its applications. (6 lectures)

        2. Stress: symmetrical and non-symmetrical stress tensors. Kinematics: Material (Lagrangian) and spatial (Eulerian) description; material derivative; deformation and strain tensors; deformation gradient. (3 lectures)

        3. Conservation laws
        Continuity equation; equation of motion; conservation of angular momentum; conservation of energy; the principle of virtual work. (3 lectures)

        4. Constitutive equations.
        Navier's equations for elasticity; Navier-Stokes equations for flow of Newtonian fluids. Examples of non-linear and non-elastic constitutive equations. (3 lectures)

        5. Computational methods.
        Introduction to extremum principles; solving Navier's equations for elasticity using extremum principle; variational approach as a basis for the finite element method. (3 lectures)

        Heterogenous Materials Modelling

        6. Overview of heterogeneous materials.
        Heterogeneous materials: traditional and new. Different types of heterogeneous materials. Overview of composites and their classification. Concrete and its use in construction. Granular materials. Ceramics. Functionally graded materials. Nanomaterials and nanotechnologies; manufacturing of nanomaterials. (4 lectures)

        7. Constitutive relationships for heterogeneous materials.
        Generalised Hooke's Law. General anisotropic materials. Orthotropic materials. Transversely isotropic materials. Restrictions on engineering constants. Transformation laws for the material constants. (3 lectures)

        8. Macro- and micro-mechanics of heterogeneous materials.
        Experimental and theoretical determination of effective properties of heterogeneous matreials. Strenght criteria. Failure theories. Specifics of compressive behaviour of direction-specific materials. Internal instability. (3 lectures)

        9. Applications of heterogeneous materials.
        Introduction to design of composite structures. Joining technologies for fibre reinforced plastics and metal matrix composites. Scaling effects. Multi-scale modelling of materials and structures. (2 lectures)

        2 one-hour lectures per week, 3 on alternate weeks and 1 one-hour tutorial per week.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (100%).

        Resit: None.

        EG 5099
        UPSTREAM OIL AND GAS PROCESSING
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Professor T Baxter

        Pre-requisite(s): EG3570 EG3575

        Note(s): Available only to candidates following an Engineering degree programme.

        Students will be introduced to the upstream systems and the processes involved in oil and gas treatment to condition the fluids for sales and disposal. Basic terminology and the interface with the hydrocarbon reservoir will be discussed. Fluid flow and the application to oil and gas well production will be covered. The use of equations of state and the development of heat and mass balances is presented. This is followed by a series of modules covering the major technologies and unit operations. The mechanisms involved in the separation of oil/gas/water are reviewed and models developed to allow residence time calculations to be made. Produced water treatment, gas compression and gas dehydration are then covered before moving onto to the topic of secondary recovery through the use of water injection and other methods. The topic of flow assurance deals with a range of physical phenomena present in upstream oil and gas systems related to the safe and continued operation of pipelines and flowlines. Fluid flow dynamics, particularly slugging, together with related effects; wax deposition, asphaltene precipitation, hydrate formation and sand are examined. The coupled flow and energy balance is reviewed. The subject of process safety and the many challenges posed by upstream oil and gas systems is tackled using a review of both theory and practical case studies. The taught material is supported by a range of simulation, laboratory, and, problem based learning exercises.

        30 one-hour lectures; 6 one-hour tutorials and 3 three-hour practicals in total.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (80%); continuous assessment (20%)

        Resit: Where a resit is offered, the mark reported will be: 1 three-hour written examination (80%), and in-course assessment mark from the 1st attempt (20%)

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        Solutions to tutorial solutions provided.

        Feedback provided in tutorial, lecture & workshop sessions.

        EG 50AE
        APPLIED ELECTROMAGENTICS
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr C D Hendry

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3006

        Co-requisite(s): None.

        The course begins with a review of vector calculus and curvilinear coordinate systems. Fundamental results of electrostatic and magnetostatics are considered and their formulation in vector calculus. The basis of Maxwell's equations is discussed and applied to plane electromagnetic waves with emphasis on light. The course then turns to the technological applications of Maxwell's equations. Transmission lines are described, including impedance, reflections, terminations and matching. Finally, waveguides, both metal and dielectric are considered.

        Thirty lectures and six tutorials.

        1st Attempt: Written examination of three hours duration (80%) plus continuous assessment (report) (20%).

        Resit: The better of a written examination of 1) three hours duration (80%) plus the previous continuous assessment (20%), and 2) the written examination (100%).

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        Tutorial sessions include questions dedicated to formative assessment.

        Face to face in small group tutorials.

        EG 50CE
        CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SAFETY, ENVIRONMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr E Bain

        Pre-requisite(s): EG40HA, EG40HB, EG40JQ

        Note(s): Available only to candidates following an Engineering degree programme.

        Process Safety: 1/3 of the course; Sustainability: 1/3 of the course; Environment: 1/3 of the course

        1 two-hour workshop OR 2 one-hour lectures per week.
        1 one-hour lecture per week.
        1 on-hour tutorial per week.
        3 three-hour laboratories

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (70%); continuous assessment (30%)

        Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (70%); previous (30%) continuous assessment carried forward

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        Solutions to tutorial problems available.

        Feedback provided in tutorial, lecture and workshop sessions.

        EG 5570
        ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT III - APPLIED ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Mr J Cavanagh

        Pre-requisite(s): EG3586 Engineering Management I and EG4570 Engineering Management II

        The course aims to provide tools and techniques to enable students to draw conclusions and provide solutions to business and management issues which are applicable across various of corporate areas. The precise content may vary but typically includes topics such as Business Strategy, Programme Management, Management of Innovation, Leadership, Six sigma/Lean Manufacturing, Asset Management, Applied Economics & Corporate Social Responsibility.

        The course incorporates a compulsory residential course which aims to equip students with essential transferable skills which students will find invaluable in securing job and succeeding in their chosen career.

        4 day residential course (9 hours per day).
        36 hrs of Lectures/Workshops/Tutorials.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (70%), continuous assessment (30%)

        Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (70%) and in-course assessment (30%) carried forward. For students who are unable to pass the course by taking a resit due to poor results in in-course assessment, the course must be retaken in its entirety.

        EG 5571
        ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT III: BUSINESS MODEL INNOVATION
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Mr J Cavanagh

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 3586; EG 4570

        Note(s): Available only to candidates following an Engineering degree programme.

        Residential course: areas covered include

        • The learning process

        • Team Work

        • Psychological preferences including MTBI

        • Creativity and Entrepreneurship

        • Presentation skills

        • Organisational Culture

        • Interview and assessment centre related skills

        • Action Centred leadership

        Business Model Innovation

          The business model canvas
        • Business model patterns: case studies for the real world

        • Techniques to help design new business models

        • Interpreting strategy through the business model lens

        • Processes for development of a business model

        36 hours of Lectures and Tutorials/Feedback Sessions
        Normally 2 hours of lectures and 1 hour of tutorial/feedback per week.
        4 day residential course (9 hours per day)

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour "open book" written examination (70%); Continuous assessment (30%).

        1 three-hour "open book" written examination.

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        Tutorials and workshops

        Feedback will be provided to students in written and/or verbal format as follows

        In response to questions and issues raised by students during lectures

        As part of group activities which take place during lectures

        During tutorials/Feedback sessions

        Following submission of summative and formative coursework

        Students can also obtain feedback on their understanding of key aspects of the course through self-administered quizzes

        Students requiring feedback on exam performance should make an appointment during the scheduled feedback session which will be announced within 4 weeks of the publication of the exam results

        In addition, any student or group of students may request feedback on any course related matter or assignment by arrangement with the course co-ordinator and/or individual contributors as appropriate.

        EG 5589
        GROUP PROJECT (MEng)
        CREDIT POINTS 30

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Ivanovic

        Pre-requisite(s): EG 4515 or EG 4513

        Co-requisite(s): None

        Note(s): Available only to students in programme year 5 of an MEng programme or with the permission of the Head of Engineering.

        Students are allocated to design teams which are supervised by members of the academic staff. The design project will be multi-disciplinary and students will work in there area of professional interest. As well as the technical aspects of the design, the design projects will require a wide variety of other issues to be addressed: safety, environmental, legal and commercial. In all cases project management, written communication, and oral presentation are included.

        1 Group design report (50%), 2 oral presentations (40%) and peer assessment (10%).

        EG 5597
        ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Kiefer

        Pre-requisite(s): EG40HA, EH40HB, EG40HC, EG3575, EG3570

        The course content will be based on 5 advanced chemical engineering topics which will vary from year depending on research direction and challenegs facing the discipline. Examples are as follows:

      • Energy Storage & Power Generation;

      • Electrochemical processes and corrosion;

      • Spectroscopy and molecular characterisation of advanced materials and processes;
      • Multiphase flow;
      • Carbon-capture and storage;

      • Fuel Cells and Environmental Remediation.
      • 2-3 one hour lectures per week plus additional workshop sessions. (30 lectures total - 6 per topic).

        1st Attempt: 1 three hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment (50%).

        Resit: 1 three hour written examination (100%).

        Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

        EG 5598
        APPLIED NUMERICAL METHODS
        CREDIT POINTS 15

        Course Co-ordinator: Dr D Pokrajac

        Pre-requisite(s): None

        Note(s): The course covers a range of numerical methods suitable for solving wave equations. The theoretical part of the course deals with the derivations of the wave equations using the principles of solid mechanics, fluid mechanics and electromagnetic theory. The applied part of the course focuses on the following engineering problems: elastic waves in a rigid body, transient pipe flow and transient states in transmission lines. It covers several numerical methods suitable for solving hyperbolic equations. The methods are used to build simulation codes which can be used for solving a broad range of engineering problems.

        Students carry out practical exercises using MATLAB for coding numerical solutions of wave equations. Numerical simulations are used as a virtual laboratory to investigate a selected practical engineering problem. The results of this investigation are presented in the report.

        12 week course – 2 one-hour lectures per week for 12 weeks, 1 two-hour computing class per week for 8 weeks and 1 tutorial per week for 2 weeks.

        1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination paper (80%) and in-course assessment (20%).