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COMPUTING SCIENCE

> Level 1
CS 1015
GRAND CHALLENGE OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr F Guerin

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

The first part of the course overviews important problems in AI (for example Natural Language Processing, Computer Vision, and Robotics), and a number of techniques which are used to tackle these problems (for example search, neural networks, and reinforcement learning). The second part of the course looks at relevant areas of Cognitive Science, including Psychology, Linguistics, Neuroscience and Philosophy. finally the course looks at the history of AI and possible future scenarios.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 one-hour practical, 1 one-hour tutorial.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); Continuous assessment: a series of short tests in practical sessions (25%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); Continuous assessment mark carried forward (25%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide student with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in electronically with incorrect answers highlighted and correct answers given. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 1019
WEB APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr N Beacham

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): (i) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator. (ii) This course cannot be taken in a graduating curriculum with CS 1516.

Topics will include:

  • programming using a scripting language, including objects, methods, control structures, data types and collections;

  • programming for the internet, including forms, application logic, database programming, and interaction with other applications using Web 2.0 technology such as Google Maps.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment (50%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment mark carried forward (50%). Continuous assessment consists of programming tasks. Resits will not be available for MSc students.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 1022
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING AND PRINCIPLES
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr W Vasconcelos

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): (i) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

The course will cover the basic principles of computer programming consisting of topics such as the following:

  • Fundamental programming concepts including variables and scope, conditional statements, and iteration.
  • Pseudocode.

  • Fundamental algorithms including simple sorting and searching, and data structures including arrays.

  • Boolean algebra, logic, set theory and proof.

  • Relations, functions, combinatorics, graphs.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour tutorial or practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forwards (25%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 1518
WEB TECHNOLOGY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr N Beacham

Pre-requisite(s): Familiarity with the Windows environment.

Co-requisite(s):

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

The design of Web sites is discussed and students are given opportunities to critique existing Web sites and design their own sites. The course will cover the following technologies: XHTML, CSS and JavaScript.

Four hours per week: 2 one hour lectures, 1 two hour practical

1st Attempt: 1 one-an-a-half-hours written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: Candidates only resit those components (multiple-choice examination, continuous assessment) which they failed at first attempt. Multiple-choice examination at resit is 1-and-a-half hours.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunies and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessment will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 1519
WEB APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Pan

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): (i) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator. (ii) This course cannot be taken in a graduating curriculum with CS 1018.

Topics will include:

  • programming using a scripting language, including objects, methods, control structures, data types and collections;
  • programming for the internet, including forms, application logic, database programming, and interaction with other applications using Web 2.0 technology such as Google Maps.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment (50%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment mark carried forward (50%). Continuous assessment consists of programming tasks.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 1520
COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr J Lam

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

  • Basics: Number Systems, (Decimal Binary Hexadecimal), Binary Addition, Logic Gates, Transistors, Power Consumption, Boolean Algebra, Multiplexer/Decoders/Timing, Latches and Flip-Flops, Finite State Machines.

  • Building Blocks: Arithmetic Circuits, Number Systems (Fixed-Point, Floating-Point), Memory Arrays, Logic Arrays.

  • Assembly Language, Machine Language, Addressing Modes, Program execution, Heaps and stacks.

  • Microarchitecture: Single-Cycle Processor, Multicycle Processor, Pipelined Processor.

  • Memory Systems: Caches, Virtual Memory.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 one-hour practical, 1 one hour tutorial.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); weekly tests (20%), practical coursework (30%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment carried forward (50%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

 

> Level 2
CS 2008
DATA MANAGEMENT
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr N Beacham

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): (i) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

The concepts of a database and database management. Database development. Illustrations. Entity-Relationship model. Database design: logical design and the relational model. Normalisation; different normal forms. Physical design; file organisation and access; indexing. Database administration. Query by Example and SQL. Query optimisation. Practical examples using MS Access.

Client-server model. Database servers. Database access from client applications. Web-based database access through server-side scripting. Practical examples using MS Access, My SQL, Php and JDBC.

A brief overview of key concepts in distributed, object -oriented, multimedia, spatial and geo-referenced database systems.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%). In order to pass this course, candidates must obtain a pass mark in the examination and in the overal combination of examination and continuous assessment.

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forwards (25%). In order to pass this course, candidates must obtain a pass mark in the examination and in the overal combination of examination and continuous assessment.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 2009
THE ELECTRONIC SOCIETY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr F Guerin

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): (i) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

What is the electronic society? What are the human factors involved in engaging in the electronic society? What is the impact of the electronic society on organisations? What impact do E-Technologies have on society? An overview of infrastructure. An introduction to issues: Legal & ethical, security, privacy, intellectual property, software failure, digital divide. Case studies from E-Commerce, E-Health, E-Science and E-Governance. These case studies will address, for example, how organisations must change to best utilise emerging technologies, issues of security and privacy in the use of patient data, and the importance of standards in E-Science.

Three hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 one-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%). In order to pass this course, candidates must obtain a pass mark in the overall combination of examination and continuous assessment.

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forwards (25%). In order to pass this course, candidates must obtain a pass mark in the overall combination of examination and continuous assessment.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Tutorial sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and presentations and debates where feedback from staff will be given.

Feedback for in-course summative assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during tutorial sessions.

CS 2012
ADVANCED WEB APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr B Scharlau

Pre-requisite(s): CS 1018 or CS 1516

Co-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): (i) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator. (ii) This course cannot be taken in a graduating curriculum with CS 2512.

Syllabus:

  • advanced programming using a scripting language, including top-down design, reading and writing to files, inheritance and other relationships between classes, event handling, error handling, testing, data structures and algorithmic structures

  • advanced programming for the internet, including searching, security, and plug-ins.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 100% from in course assessments. In order to pass the course, candidates must obtain a pass mark (CAS > 8).

Resit: Candidates will be able to resubmit the in course assessment, which will be capped at CAS 9.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 2506
HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Prof C Mellish

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): (i) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

The need to consider usability, task analysis, contextual design, query techniques and focus groups, information architecture, types of interfaces, prototyping, analytical usability evaluation, evaluation of safety-critical systems, user testing, universal access, cross-cultural design and internationalisation, psychology of HCI, technical writing. Extra advanced topics may vary from year to year.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%). In order to pass this course, candidates must obtain a pass mark in the examination and in the overal combination of examination and continuous assessment.

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forwards (25%). In order to pass this course, candidates must obtain a pass mark in the examination and in the overal combination of examination and continuous assessment.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment. The assessed coursework involves most of the students working in groups and learning as a result of the interactions that take place.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 2510
MODERN PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr W Vasconcelos

Pre-requisite(s): CS 1012 Computer Programming and Principles.

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

  • Major programming paradigms including procedural, functional and logic.

  • Syntax and semantics of programming languages.
  • Imperative programming languages (including object-oriented).

  • Functional programming languages.

  • Logic programming languages.

  • Parallel programming languages.

  • Domain-specific and special-purpose programming languages.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forwards (25%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 2512
ADVANCED WEB APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: TBC

Pre-requisite(s): CS 1516

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): (i) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator. (ii) This course cannot be taken in a graduating curriculum with CS 2012.

Syllabus:

  • advanced programming using a scripting language, including top-down design, reading and writing to files, inheritance and other relationships between classes, event handling, error handling, testing, data structures and algorithmic structures.

  • advanced programming for the internet, including searching, security, and plug-ins.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 100% from in course assessments. In order to pass the course, candidates must obtain a pass mark (CAS > 8).

Resit: Candidates will be able to resubmit the in course assessment, which will be capped at CAS 9.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 2521
ALGORITHMIC PROBLEM SOLVING
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr N. Oren

Pre-requisite(s):

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

This course identifies fundamental data structures and algorithms as the basic building blocks of software systems, and provides experience of their implementation and application using the Java programming language. Introduction to Design of algorithms. Recursion and simple analysis of recursive methods. Data Types & Abstraction. Use of the Java Collection Framework. Stacks, Queues, Deques and Lists. Hash tables. Trees. Search Trees. Heaps. Sets. Algorithmic paradigms and their applications. Implementation issues and efficiency measures.

12 week course - 2 one-hour lectures, 1 one-hour tutorial and 1 one-hour practical per week.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%) and in course assessments (50%). In order to pass the course, candidates must obtain a pass mark in the examination and in the overall combinations of examination and in-course assessment (with the above weights).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); 25% carried forward from the weight adjusted original in-course assessments. Candidates must obtain a pass mark in the exam and the overall combination of exam and in-course assessment.

 

> Level 3
CS 3008
OPERATING SYSTEMS
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Kollingbaum

Pre-requisite(s): CS 2007, CS 2008

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator. Non-graduating students would require the following background/experience: knowledge of common data-structures and algorithms; experience of the C programming language.

Comparative and historical studies of operating systems. OS structure and services: system calls, system programs, virtualisation.
Processes and threads: scheduling, operation, co-operation and communication. Synchronisation, semaphores and deadlock handling. Memory management: logical and physical address spaces, swapping, segmentation and paging. File systems, directory structure, and storage allocation. Protection and security. Comparing and contrasting examples and case studies from a variety of operating systems.

2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical per week.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment carried forward (50%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 3017
ADAPTIVE INTERACTIVE SYSTEMS
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr A Siddharthan

Pre-requisite(s): CS 2506, CS 2011

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator. Non-graduating students would require the following background/experience: familiarity with basic algorithmic problem solving and human-computer interaction.

  • Adaptive Hypermedia
  • User Modelling
  • Content-based and collaborative filering
  • Group modelling
  • Affective and persuasive computing
  • Application domains (eg infomation retrieval, personalized news, personalized e-learning, personalized digital tv, personalized e-commerce, personalized health-care, ambient intellegence
  • Usability aspects of adaptive systems (scrutability, believability, privacy)

2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forward (25%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 3019
KNOWLEDGE BASED SYSTEMS
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr J. Z. Pan

Pre-requisite(s): CS 2007 or CS 2509

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator. (ii) Non-graduating students would require the following background/experience: familiarity with a procedural programming language.

  • Knowledge representation: propositional logic, description logics, ontology, rules, uncertainty and vagueness.

  • Knowledge reasoning: description logics-based and rule-based systems, tableaux (completion) algorithm for description logics, forward chaining and backward chaining for rules.

  • Knowledge engineering: expertise identification, capture, evaluations, reusability.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forwards (25%).

Only the marks obtained on first sitting can count towards Honours classification.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 3022/CS 3522/CS 3922
BUSINESS AND INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS OF IT (SHORT PLACMENT)
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr B Scharlau

Pre-requisite(s): Students should have completed their second-year Computing programme.

Note(s):

  • Restricted to students registered for Honours and Joint-Honours degree programmes offered by Computing Science.
  • Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any student wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.
  • Projects associated with the client firm need to be approved by the course organiser.

The content and practical skills gained by the student will vary depending upon the nature of the placement.

Weekly email reports from the student. Where possible a site visit by the supervisor will also take place.

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (100%) consisting of an oral presentation in the form of a presentation to the department (15%), and a final report of approximately 3,500 words (85%).

Resits are not normally allowed for this course.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students will get formative feedback during work from their colleagues and supervisor. They may also get feedback based on the email reports.

Students will supply weekly email updates to the course organiser explaining their current work, what work is to be done in the next week, and any problems, which have arisen so that the organiser can suggest possible solutions, or intervene if necessary.

CS 3023
ROBOTICS - AI MEETS REALITY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr N Oren

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): (i) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

  • Architectures for robotics (eg. subsumption, schema-based, deliberative, reactive)mobile robots.

  • Sensing (eg. interfacing with different sensor types).

  • Computer vision (eg. edge detection).

  • Intelligent behaviour + search and planning (eg. D* search, classical and partial order planning) + learning (eg. Reinforcement learning, Bayesian Networks, Decision trees), static robots.

  • Theoretical background (eg. forces, torque).

  • Mechanics of robots (eg. forward kinematics).

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forwards (25%).

Only the marks obtained on first sitting can count towards Honours classification.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 3024
SOFTWARE ENGINEERING AND PROFESSIONAL ISSUES
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr E Compatangelo

Pre-requisite(s): CS 2007, CS 2008, CS 2506

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

  • Introduction to software engineering: software development paradigms, software lifecycle, the Unified Paradigm.

  • Project management issues: team organisation, time and cost estimation, risk analysis. Software modelling and coding issues - The Unified Modelling Language (UML); Computer-Aided Software Engineering.

  • Software analysis and design issues - requirements elicitation, developing a system specification through use cases, architectural design, detailed design, design patterns.

  • Software implementation and quality issues - testing strategies and methods; quality assurance and management; software verification and validation; software documentation and maintenance.

  • Ethics: the individual, organisational and societal context of computing systems; deployemnt of technical knowledge and skills with a concern for the public good.

  • Legal Issues: UK legal system, contract law liabilities, company and employment law, data protection, computer misuse, intellectual property rights.

  • Public policy issues: digital signatures, restrictions on encryption, IT monopolies.

  • Safety/mission critical software: impact of failure on users; liability; risk analysis.

  • Professional Bodies: structure, function, restriction of title, licence to practise, code of ethics/conduct/practice.

  • Career: Career options; entrepreneurship; rights and duties of an employee.

  • Aspects of effective communication: written and verbal communication skills.

24 week course: 3 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour individual practical per week during first half-session; 1 1/2 hour group practical per week during the first half-session; 1 one-hour group practical per week during second half-session.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (25%) and two software engineering project deliverables (20% and 40% respectively, 60% in total, one individual in-course assessment on professional topics consisting of 4,000 word essay/report (15%)).

Resit: Students must resit the component(s) they have failed. (written examination and/or individual in-course assessment on professional topics). Students who have failed the combined software engineering project deliverables component need to repeat the course the following year.

Only marks gained on the first attempt will count towards Honours classification.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 3517
DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS AND SECURITY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Kollingbaum

Pre-requisite(s): CS 2007, CS 2008

Note(s): (i) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator. (ii) Non-graduating students would require the following background/experience: intermediate level Java programming experience; knowledge of database principles including SQL.

  • Introduction to Distributed Systems.
  • Programming with Distributed Objects: Java RMI; Object Serialization; Managing Multiple Threads of Control; Security Policies; Multi-Tier Client-Server Systems.

  • Programming with Distributed Data Sources: Transactions and Concurrency Control; Distributed Transactions; Replication; Fault-Tolerant Systems.

  • Security in Distributed Systems: Cryptography, Authentication, Digital Signatures and Certificates, SSL, Firewalls.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forwards (25%).

Only the marks obtained on the first attempt can be used for Honours classification.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 3518
LANGUAGES AND COMPUTABILITY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr K van Deemter

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

  • Imperative languages and their associated automata: Regular languages and Finite state automata (FSA), Context-free languages and Pushdown Automata (PDA), Non-context-free languages and linear-bounded automata (LBA), Turing Machines (TM), nondeterministic Turing Machines.

  • Functional languages: Haskell idioms, Haskell polymorphic types, recursion, Haskell higher-order functions, lazy evaluation, infinite sets.

  • Chomsky hierarchy and computability: Turing decidability, Turing recognisability, injections, surjections and bijections, Cantor's diagonal argument, the halting problem, the Church-Turing Thesis.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forwards (25%).

Only the marks obtained on first sitting can be used for Honours classification.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 3519
E-BUSINESS STRATEGIES
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr E Compatangelo

Pre-requisite(s): CS2506 Human-Computer Interaction.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

Entrepreneurial Aspects:

  • Finding the idea: identifying market niches and discontinuities, gaps, and unaddressed needs/issues inside them.

  • Shaping the idea: devising a possible solution, evaluating its feasibility, assessing risks.

  • Protecting the idea: patents, copyright, trademarks, civil liability.

  • Creating a business around the idea: types of business, contractual obligations, devising a business plan.

  • Financing the idea: Funding sources, cash flow, financial issues, tax issues.

  • Promoting the idea: presenting, showcasing, advertising, influencing.

  • Further legal issues: Tax issues, contracts, digital signature and computer contracts, and case studies.

Three one hour lectures and two hours of tutorial per week.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination on legal aspects (50%) and continuous assessment on business aspects (50%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination on legal aspects (50%). Continuous assessment mark carried forwards (50%).
Only results obtained in the 1st attempt can count towards Honours classification.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunies and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 3521
ENTERPRISE COMPUTING AND BUSINESS
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr B Scharlau

Pre-requisite(s): CS 2008

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

Syllabus:

a) principles of business computing including customer relationship management, supply chain management, data warehousing and online analytical processing, enterprise resource planning and business information systems.

b) security issues in computing including authentication, cryptography, secure signatures and threat analysis.

2 one-hour lectures (to be arranged) and 1 two-hour practical (to be arranged) per week.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%). In order to pass the course, candidates must obtain a pass mark (CAS > 8) in the examination and in the overall combination of examination and continuous assessment (with the above weights).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forward (25%). In order to pass the course, candidates must obtain a pass mark (CAS > 8) in the examination and in the overall combination of examination and continuous assessment (with the above weights).

CS 3523
AI FOR COMPUTER GAMES
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Collinson

Pre-requisite(s): CS 2011, CS 2506, CS 3019

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator. Non-graduating students would require the following background/experience: knowledge of basic concepts of AI and HCI.

  • Overview of AI Game Techniques
  • Movement Algorithms: Steering Behaviours, Predicting Physics, Motor Control
  • Pathfinding: Depth First, A*, Mapping, Team Problems
  • Decision Making: Decision Trees, Slate Machines, Fuzzy Logic, Markov Systems, Goal Oriented Behaviour, Scripting
  • Tactical and Strategic AI: Waypoint Tactics, Tactical Analyses, Tatical Pathfinding, Coordinated Action, Planning
  • Learning: Reinforcement Learning, Neural Networks
  • Board Games: Game Theory, Minimaxing, Opening Books and Other Set Plays
  • Execution Management: Scheduling, Anytime, Algorithms, Event Managers
  • Game Case Studies: Shooters, Sports, Driving, Real-time Strategy, Turn-Based Strategy Games
  • Search: Depth first, Breadth first, Heuristic
  • Human Factors: user interaction and interfaces, social aspects

1 one-hour lecture, 1 two-huor practical, 1 one-hour tutorial.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment, 2 significant AI programming assignments, each to be accompanied by a short report (25% each).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment carried forward (50%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 3530
ENTERPRISE COMPUTING
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr. B Scharlau

Pre-requisite(s): CS 2007, CS 2008, CS 2506

Co-requisite(s): CS 3015

Note(s): (i) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

Syllabus:

  • principles of business computing including customer relationship management, supply chain management, data warehousing and online analytical processing, enterprise resource planning and business information systems.

  • business models for enterprises.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forwards (25%).

Only the mark obtained on the first attempt can be used for Honours classification.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 3901
BUSINESS AND INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS OF IT (SUMMER PLACEMENT)
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr B Scharlau

Pre-requisite(s): Students should have completed their second-year Computing programme.

Note(s):

  1. Restricted to students registered for Honours and Joint-Honours degree programmes offered by Computing Science.
  2. Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any student wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.
  3. Projects associated with the client firm need to be approved by the course organiser.

The content and practical skills gained by the student will vary depending upon the nature of the placement.

Weekly email reports from the student.

Where possible a site visit by the supervisor will also take place.

1st Attempt: Continuous assessment (100%) consisting of an oral presentation in the form of a presentation to the department (15%), and a final report of approximately 5,000 words (85%).

Resit: Resits are not normally allowed for this course.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Students will get formative feedback during work from their colleagues and supervisor. They may also get feedback based on the email reports.

Students will supply weekly email updates to the course organiser explaining their current work, what work is to be done in the next week, and any problems, which have arisen so that the organiser can suggest possible solutions, or intervene if necessary.

 

> Level 4

PLEASE NOTE: Resit: (for Honours students only): Candidates achieving a CAS mark of 6-8 may be awarded compensatory level 1 credit. Candidates achieving a CAS mark of less than 6 will be required to submit themselves for re-assessment and should contact the Course Co-ordinator for further details.

CS 4025
NATURAL LANGUAGE PROCESSING
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr K van Deemter

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): (i) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

  • Formal linguistic models of English: word categories, sentence constituents, phrase-structure grammar rules, features. Modelling syntactic phenemena.

  • Parsing: shift-reduce parsers, chart parsers, handling ambiguity, definate clause grammars.

  • Semantics and pragmatics: meaning representations, reference, speech acts.

  • Generation: Content determination, sentence planning, and realisation.

  • Applications: grammar checking, machine translation, database interfaces, report generation, dictation.

  • Speech: Hidden Markov Models, statistical langauge models, speech synthesis.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forwards (25%).

Only the marks obtained at first sitting can be used for Honours classification.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 4027
PEER-TO-PEER AND AGENT-BASED COMPUTING
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr. W W. Vasconcelos

Pre-requisite(s): CS 3517 Distributed Systems and Security.

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

Introduction to peer-to-peer computing and motivation.

  • Basic peer-to-peer algorithms and models: Centralised Directory, Flooded Request and Document Routing. Peer-to-peer topologies. Case studies.

  • Issues: Scalability, Anonymity/Privacy, Security, Performance, Reliability. Sample peer-to-peer technologies (e.g., Gnutella, Freenet and JXTA). Introduction to intelligent software agents and multi-agent systems. Motivations. Case studies. Basic concepts of software agents and multi-agent systems. Theories of agency, agent architectures and agent-oriented programming languages. Agent communication languages and protocols, including standards. Agent programming platforms. Negotiation and co-ordination mechanisms. Electronic institutions. Auctions and voting. Tuple spaces programming for agent communication and coordination. Distributed problem-solving.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: No resits.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 4028
SECURITY
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Professor D Pym

Pre-requisite(s): CS 2011 (Algorithmic Problem Solving); CS 3517 (Distributed Systems and Security).

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator. This course will not be available in 2012/13.

  • The security landscape,

  • Access control.

  • Usability and psychology.

  • Cryptography (symmetric).

  • Protocols and keys

  • Network attack and defence.

  • Security policy.

  • Cryptography (asymmetric).

  • Development of systems and software with security considerations.

  • Evaluation, Assurance, Compliance.

  • The Economics of Security.

  • The wider implications of security, and a look at the future of security.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 one-hour tutorial, 1 one-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: 1 two hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment mark carried forwards (25%).

Only the first attempt mark will be used for Honours degree classification.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 4034
SEMANTIC WEB ENGINEERING
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr J. Z. Pan

Pre-requisite(s): CS 3019

Note(s): (i)Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator. (ii) Non-graduating students would require the following background/experience: basic concepts of knowledge representation and reasoning.

XML and XSLT, XML Schema, AJAX, Tagging, Microformat, RDF, SPARQL, OWL, Ontology Design Pattern, Ontology Construction Using XSLT, Jena: Constructing RDF Graphs, Jena: Populating OWL Ontologies, Mashup, Semantic Mashup.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment (50%). Continuous assessment consists of a group presentation and 5,000 word group report (25%) and an individual project to create a web application (25%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 4035
MOBILE COMPUTING
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr B Scharlau

Pre-requisite(s): CS 3514, CS 3515

Note(s): (i) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

The course provides an overview of the technologies underlying modern mobile computing environments.

  • Mobile Operating Systems.

  • Why mobiles matter.

  • Mobile ecosystem - follow the call.

  • Server-side integration.

  • Data storage on the device.

  • SMS.

  • Location based services.

  • Augmented Reality and pushing the boundaries.

  • Bluetooth integration.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: No resit.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 4036
ARTIFICIAL SOCIETIES
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: TBC

Pre-requisite(s): CS 3517

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

Theories of agency and autonomous behaviour. Societal behaviour (coordination, collaboration and competition). Designing societies (communication languages and protocols, game theory). Joint distributed planning and enactment. Reaching agreement (auctions, negotiation and argumentation). Constraining behaviour (mechanism design, norms, organisations, electronic institutions). Swarm intelligence and very large societies.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: No resits.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 4037
GRAPHICS
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: TBC

Pre-requisite(s): Restricted to students registered for Honours degree programmes offered by Computing Science.

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

  • Two-dimensional graphics: lines, polygons, coordinate systems, clipping, raster techniques, polygon filling, anti-aliasing, bit-planes, colour models.

  • Three-dimensional graphics: coordinate systems, homogeneous transformations (rotating, translating, scaling), perspective, surface models, hidden line and surface removal, lighting models, shading, shadows, textures, ray tracing.

  • Object-oriented techniques: scene graphs, behaviours, interpolators, collision detection.

  • Graphics hardware: input/output (including virtual reality) devices, stereographics, animation and interaction techniques.

Applications of computer graphics will be considered (eg. CAD, molecular graphics, scientific visualisation, entertainment).

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: No resit.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 4038
DATA MINING AND VISUALIZATION
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr Y Sripada

Pre-requisite(s): CS 2011, CS 2008, CS 2508

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator. To be taken as part of the BSc honours programme in Computing Science. This course will not be available in 2012/13.

  • Data Mining: basic statistics, advanced data analysis techniques such as trend detectors, pattern detectors, qualitative models, basic data mining techniques such as classification and clustering.
  • Visualization: information visualization (basic concepts, advanced techniques such as treemaps); supporting user variation (abillities, knowledge, preferences)
  • Applications to real world problems: for example, medical decision support, supporting analysis of genome data

2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical per week. Also, guest seminars from people other than the main lecturer.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Resit: No resit.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 4039
COMPUTATIONAL INTELLIGENCE
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr G. M. Coghill

Pre-requisite(s): CS 10PP, CS 2007, CS 2008.

Note(s): (i) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

A selection of topics spanning a range of Computational Intelligence approaches under the following headings:

  • Fuzzy Systems (e.g. Fuzzy Logic, Fuzzy Rule Bases, Mamdani Methods).

  • Model-based Technology (e.g. Qualitative and Fuzzy Qualitative reasoning, model-based diagnosis).

  • Nature Inspired Computing (eg. Neural Nets Artificial Immune Systems, Particle Swarm optimisation methods. This will include a rudimentary presentation of the basic biological principles involved).

2 one-hour lectures per week, 4 hours of practicals.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (75%); continuous assessment (25%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 4040
RESEARCH METHODS
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr G Coghill

Pre-requisite(s): Open to level 4 CS students.

In all the topics covered the emphasis will be on understanding the diversity of issues in and approaches to computing research, and imbuing the ability to select and utilise the appropriate tools for your research.

  • Introduction of Computing Research
  • Identifying research questions and hypothese - comparative analysis
  • Statistical methods
  • Experimental design methods
  • Approaches to analysis and drawing valid conclusions
  • Reviewing Research papers
  • Writing Research Reports

One lecture, one seminar per week and significant amounts of self-directed learning.

1st Attempt: in-course assessment; submission of an assignment of up to 5,000 words in which the student describes a problem, the approach they have taken to investigate it and the details of their investigation (100%).

Resit: No resit.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-sourse assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 4044
PROGRAMMING FOR THE CLOUD
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr B Scharlau

Pre-requisite(s): CS 2012, or CS 2511, or CS 3517, or similar.

Co-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

The course offers an understanding of developing applications for cloud computing, along with practical experience in designing and developing such applications.

Four hours per week: 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical.

1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment in the form of an application development (50%).

Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment mark carried forwards (50%).

Only the marks gained at the first attempt can count towards Honours classification.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

During lectures, the Personal Response System and/or other ways of student interaction will be used for formative assessment. Additionally, practical sessions will provide students with practice opportunities and formative assessment.

Formative feedback for in-course assessments will be provided in written form. Additionally, formative feedback on performance will be provided informally during practical sessions.

CS 4092
SINGLE HONOURS ERASMUS COMPUTING PROJECT (E2)
CREDIT POINTS 90

Course Co-ordinator: Dr J R Lishman

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to Erasmus students registered for Computing Science and that can be assimilated to our Final year Single Honours students.

Note(s): Assistive technology may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any Erasmus students wishing to discuss this further should contact the Departmental Disability Coordinator prior to arrival.

The student will undertake a project under the supervision of teaching staff in the department. The project will require creativity, analytical and practical skills. A major component of the project is its presentation, both written and oral.

Self-directed work, 1 hour weekly meetings; initial introductory discussion to establish workplan.

1st Attempt: Report and documentation (95%), oral presentation (5%).

Resit: None.

CS 4093
SINGLE HONOURS ERASMUS COMPUTING PROJECT (E3)
CREDIT POINTS 60

Course Co-ordinator: Dr J R Lishman

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to Erasmus students registered for Computing Science and that can be assimilated to our Final year Single Honours students.

Note(s): Assistive technology may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any Erasmus students wishing to discuss this further should contact the Departmental Disability Coordinator prior to arrival.

The student will undertake a project under the supervision of teaching staff in the department. The project will require creativity, analytical and practical skills. A major component of the project is its presentation, both written and oral.

Self-directed work, 1 hour weekly meetings; initial introductory discussion to establish workplan.

1st Attempt: Report and documentation (95%), oral presentation (5%).

Resit: None.

CS 4524
PROFESSIONAL TOPICS IN COMPUTING
CREDIT POINTS 10

Course Co-ordinator: TBC

Pre-requisite(s): CS 3024

Note(s): 1. Restricted to Final Year Single Honours students in Computing Science. 2. Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disbaility Co-ordinator.

  • Ethics: the individual, organisational and societal context of computing systems; deployment of technical knowledge and skills with a concern for the public good.

  • Legal Issues: UK legal system, contract law liabilities, company and employment law, data protection, computer misuse, intellectual property rights.

  • Public policy issues: digital signatures, restrictions on encryption, IT monopolies.

  • Safety/mission critical software: impact of failure on users; liability; risk analysis.

  • Professional Bodies: structure, function, restriction of title, licence to practise, code of ethics/conduct/practice.

  • Career: Career options; entrepreneurship; rights and duties of an employee.

  • Aspects of effective communication: written and verbal communication skills.

8 week course - 2 one-hour lectures, 1 two-hour practical session per week.

1st Attempt: One 1.5 hour examination (75%) and in-course assessment consisting of: 4000 word essay/report (20%), oral presentation (5%).

CS 4525
JOINT HONOURS COMPUTING PROJECT
CREDIT POINTS 30

Course Co-ordinator: Dr F Guerin

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): (i) Only available to Honours computing students, or to Erasmus student by permission of Head of Computing Science. (ii) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

Consists of a supervised project which provides experience of investigating a real problem in computing science, or a computing application/technology. Presenting the results obtained is an integral part of the investigation.

14 one-hour supervisory sessions.

1st Attempt: Submission of final project report (not to exceed 17,000 words in length) and any code written, and presentation and demo of code (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Submission of project plan after two weeks.

Formative feedback for the project plan will be provided in written form to those students whose plan is not deemed to be adequate. Additionally, formative feedback on performance (for all students) will be provided informally during weekly meetings with the project supervisor.

The student has the opportunity to generate a draft of the thesis prior to submission for review by the supervisor who provides comments.

CS 4526
SINGLE HONOURS COMPUTING PROJECT
CREDIT POINTS 50

Course Co-ordinator: Dr F Guerin

Pre-requisite(s): Restricted to Final Year Single Honours students in Computing Science.

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any student wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

The student will undertake a project under the supervision of teaching staff in Computing Science. The project will require creativity, analytical and practical skills. A major component of the project is its presentation, both written and oral.

15 week project course - weekly meetings with project supervisor.

1st Attempt: Report and documentation (95%), oral presentation (5%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

CS 4593
SINGLE HONOURS ERASMUS COMPUTING PROJECT (E4)
CREDIT POINTS 60

Course Co-ordinator: Dr F Guerin

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to Erasmus students registered for Computing Science and that can be assimilated to our Final year Single Honours students.

Note(s): Assistive technology may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any Erasmus students wishing to discuss this further should contact the Departmental Disability Coordinator prior to arrival.

The student will undertake a project under the supervision of teaching staff in the department. The project will require creativity, analytical and practical skills. A major component of the project is its presentation, both written and oral.

Self-directed work, 1 hour weekly meetings; initial introductory discussion to establish workplan.

1st Attempt: Report and documentation (95%), oral presentation (5%).

Resit: None.

CS 4594
SINGLE HONOURS ERASMUS COMPUTING PROJECT
CREDIT POINTS 60

Course Co-ordinator: Dr F Guerin

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

Consists of a supervised project which provides experience of investigating a real problem in computing science, or a computing application/technology. Presenting the results obtained is an integral part of the investigation.

Around 14 one-hour supervisory sessions.

1st Attempt: Submission of final project report and any code written, and presentation and demo of code (100%).

Resit: None.

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Submission of project plan after two weeks.

Formative feedback for the project plan will be provided in written form to those students whose plan is not deemed to be adequate. Additionally, formative feedback on performance (for all students) will be provided informally during weekly meetings with the project supervisor.

The student has the opportunity to generate a draft of the thesis prior to submission for review by the supervisor who provides comments.

CS 4904
SINGLE HONOURS ERASMUS COMPUTING PROJECT E1
CREDIT POINTS 120

Course Co-ordinator: Dr F Guerin

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): (i) Only available to ERASMUS students with permission of Head of Computing Science.

(ii) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

Consists of a supervised project which provides experience of investigating a real problem in computing science, or a computing application/technology. Presenting the results obtained is an integral part of the investigation.

Around 20 one-hour supervisory sessions.

Submission of final project report (not to exceed 17,000 words in length) and any code written, and presentation and demo of code (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Submission of project plan after two weeks.

Formative feedback for the project plan will be provided in written form to those students whose plan is not deemed to be adequate. Additionally, formative feedback on performance (for all students) will be provided informally during weekly meetings with the project supervisor.

The student has the opportunity to generate a draft of the thesis prior to submission for review by the supervisor who provides comments.

CS 4993
SINGLE HONOURS ERASMUS COMPUTING PROJECT (E5)
CREDIT POINTS 60

Course Co-ordinator: Dr J R Lishman

Pre-requisite(s): Available only to Erasmus students registered for Computing Science and that can be assimilated to our Final year Single Honours students.

Note(s): Assistive technology may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any Erasmus students wishing to discuss this further should contact the Departmental Disability Coordinator prior to arrival.

The student will undertake a project under the supervision of teaching staff in the department. The project will require creativity, analytical and practical skills. A major component of the project is its presentation, both written and oral.

Self-directed work, 1 hour weekly meetings; initial introductory discussion to establish workplan.

1st Attempt: Report and documentation (95%), oral presentation (5%).

Resit: None.

CS 4999
SINGLE HONOURS ERASMUS COMPUTING PROJECT E5
CREDIT POINTS 60

Course Co-ordinator: Dr F Guerin

Pre-requisite(s): None.

Note(s): (i) Only available to ERASMUS students with permission of Head of Computing Science.

(ii) Assistive technologies may be required for any student who is unable to use a standard keyboard/mouse/computer monitor. Any students wishing to discuss this further should contact the School Disability Co-ordinator.

Consists of a supervised project which provides experience of investigating a real problem in computing science, or a computing application/technology. Presenting the results obtained is an integral part of the investigation.

Around 14 one-hour supervisory sessions.

1st Attempt: Submission of final project report (not to exceed 17,000 words in length) and any code written, and presentation and demo of code (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Submission of project plan after two weeks.

Formative feedback for the project plan will be provided in written form to those students whose plan is not deemed to be adequate. Additionally, formative feedback on performance (for all students) will be provided informally during weekly meetings with the project supervisor.

The student has the opportunity to generate a draft of the thesis prior to submission for review by the supervisor who provides comments.

CS 501P
BUSINESS AND INDUSTRIAL PLACEMENT OF IT
CREDIT POINTS 120

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M Kollingbaum

Pre-requisite(s): Acceptance into Senior Honours and permission of Head of Computing Science. Availability of placement.

Work experience in an industrial, business, or public sector organisation.

1st Attempt: Written report (75%); Viva (15%) and seminar (10%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information