Professor DAVID SALT

6th Century Chair

Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh

Professor DAVID SALT

Contact Details

Telephone: +44 (0)1224 272696
Email: david.salt@abdn.ac.uk
Personal website:

 

http://www.ionomicshub.org

Address: University of Aberdeen Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences Cruickshank Building St Machar Drive, Aberdeen, Scotland AB24 3UU, United Kingdom
hCard

Ionomics HUB http://www.ionomicshub.org

Ionomic Atlas http://www.ionomicshub.org/ionomicsatlas/

 

-------------------------------------------------------------

Biography

EDUCATION

1981 - 1984       B.Sc. (Hons)  Biochemistry, 1st class with distinction, University College North Wales, Bangor, U.K.      

1984 - 1985       M.Sc.  Computer Studies, Hallam University, Sheffield, U.K.

1985 - 1988       Ph.D.  Thesis Title: Copper-binding peptides of Mimulus guttatus, Supervisor: DA Thurman, Liverpool University, Liverpool, U.K.

POSTDOCTORAL TRAINING

1988 - 1990       Team Leader, Centre for Biochemical Engineering, University College London,    London, U.K.

1990 - 1992       Postdoctoral Scholar,with GJ Wagner, Department of Agronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA

1992 - 1993       Research Associate,with WE Rauser, Botany Department, Guelph University, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

EMPLOYMENT HISTORY

1993 - 1997       Assistant Research Professor, Center for Agricultural Molecular Biology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA

1995 - 1999       Consultant and member of Science Advisory Board for Phytotech Inc, Monmouth Junction, NJ, USA

1998 - 2000       Assistant Professor of Biochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, USA.

2000 - 2004       Consultant and member of Science Advisory Board for NuCycle Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ.

2000 – 2001      Associate Professor of Biochemistry, Dept of Chemistry, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, USA.

2001 – 2005      Associate Professor, Dept Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.

2004 – 2007      Scientific Director for Genomic Research and Technology, Bindley Bioscience Center, Discovery Park, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.

2005 – 2011      Professor, Dept Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

2011 – present  Professor and Sixth Century Chair of Plant Science, School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.

2012 – present  Co-Director of the Centre for Genome Enabled Biology and Medicine, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.

HONORS AND AWARDS

  • Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (FRSE), 2014.
  • Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), 2011.
  • Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (FRSC), 2010.
  • The Purdue University Herbert Newby McCoy Award winner, 2010.
  • Critiques and Awards Program, Gold Award for Genomics Explorer exhibit, Association for Communication Excellence, 2010.
  • First prize Interactive Media Award, Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge, NSF/AAAS, 2008 (Science 321: 1767-1775 (Sept 2008) for the Genomics Digital Lab (GDL).
  • World Summit Awards e-Science & Technology winner for the Genomics Digital Lab (GDL), 2009 http://www.wsis-award.org/winners/winners.wbp
  • Purdue University Faculty Scholar 2003 – 2008
  • Nominated by Nature Biotechnology (March 2006) as one of the “thought leaders and technology pioneers” in biotechnology in the past 10 years (Nature Biotech 24: 291).

PhD STUDENTS, POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCHERS AND TECHNICAL STAFF

Ph.D. Students

  • John Freeman, (Purdue Univeristy 2001 – graduated 2004)
  • Jeff Gustin (Purdue University 2002 – graduated 2007).
  • Tommy Sors (Purdue University 2003 – graduated 2008)
  • Gun-Nam Na (Purdue University 2003 – graduated 2009)
  • Prashant Hosmani (Purdue University 2007 – graduated 2012)
  • Jessica Brazelton (Purdue University 2008 – graduated 2012)
  • Macarena Maria Silva Guzman (Purdue University 2010 – present)
  • Monika Ewa Mierzwinska (Univeristy of Aberdeen 2012 – present)
  • Silvia Busoms – Dual Degree Programme University of Aberdeen & Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (2012 – present)
  • Licida Giuliani (University of Aberdeen 2014 – present)

 M.Sc Students

  • Pam Motley, (Northern Arizona University 1998 – graduated 2000)
  • Matt Mandreat (Purdue University 2008 – graduated 2011)

 Postdoctoral Research Fellows

  • Dr. Xianghe Yan (Rutgers University 1996 - 1997)
  • Dr. Lakhar Sreedhar (Rutgers University 1996 - 1997)
  • Dr. Ute Krämer (NATO Fellow, Rutgers University 1996 - 1997)
  • Dr. Mike Persans (Northern Arizona University 1998 - 2002)
  • Dr Dennis Brunk (Purdue University 2001 – 2003)
  • Dr Bakhtiyor Yakubov (Purdue University 2001 – 2007)
  • Dr Mehrzad Mahmoudian (Purdue University 2001 – 2003)
  • Dr Wendy Peer (Purdue University 2001 – 2003)
  • Dr Donggiun Kim (Purdue University 2002 – 2005)
  • Dr Muthukumar Balasubramaniam (Purdue University 2003 – 2009)
  • Dr Ana Rus (Purdue University 2003 – 2006)
  • Dr Danielle Ellis (Purdue University 2001 – 2006)
  • Dr. Ivan Baxter (Purdue University 2004 – 2009)
  • Dr. Hyeong Cheol Park (Purdue University 2005 – 2008)
  • Dr. John Danku (Purdue University 2006 – 2011)
  • Dr. Monica Borghi (Purdue University 2007 – 2010)
  • Dr. Daiyin Chao (Purdue University/Univeristy of Aberdeen 2007 – 2013)
  • Dr. Xinyuan Huang (Purdue University/University of Aberdeen 2010 - present).
  • Dr. Takehiro Kamiya (JSPS Fellow, Universitry of Aberdeen 2011 – 2013).
  • Dr. Yaling Wang (University of Aberdeen 2012 - 2013).
  • Dr. Peng Wang (University of Aberdeen 2013 - present).
  • Dr. Ana Atala Lomelo Campos (University of Aberdeen 2014 – present).
  • Dr. Wilhelmus van Dijk (University of Aberdeen 2014 – present).
  • Dr. Guilhem Reyt (University of Aberdeen 2014 - present).
  • Dr. Paulina Flis (University of Aberdeen 2014 - present).
  • Dr. Eduardo Sanchez Bermejo (University of Aberdeen starts Jan 2015)

Technical Research Support Staff

  • Jean-Marc Patnoe (Northern Arizona University 1998 - 1999)
  • Teresa Thompson (Purdue University 2004 - 2011)
  • Brett Lahner (Purdue University 2000 – 2011)
  • Elena Yakubov (Purdue University 2004 – 2011)
  • Marina Tikhonova (Purdue University 2007 – 2009)
  • Dr. Daniel Lou-Hing (University of Aberdeen 2012 – 2012)
  • Dr. John Danku, Ionomics technologist (University of Aberdeen 2011 – present)
  • Holly Mackay, Laboratory manager (Univeristy of Aberdeen 2013 - present)

Research Interests

Professor Salt’s long term research interest is to understand the function of the genes and gene networks that regulate the plant ionome[defined as the elemental composition of an organism, tissue or cell], along with the evolutionary forces that shape this regulation. It was Professor Salt’s pioneering work (Lahner et al., 2003), along with his collaborators, that led to the new research paradigm of ionomics (reviewed in Salt et al., 2008). This ionomics approach was featured on the cover of Nature Biotechnology, was the subject of a “News and Views” in Nature Biotechnology (Rea, 2003), and was reviewed in Trends in Biotechnology, where the approach was described as “an impressive incorporation of plant genetics, analytical chemistry and statistical analysis.”

To encourage a diverse group of researchers to participate in ionomics, Professor Salt has developed a unique online web-based community portal called the ionomicsHUB (www.ionomicshub.org). The ionomicsHUB focuses on both workflow control for high-throughput data collection (Baxter et al., 2007), and delivery of ionomic data to the community. New funding is now allowing additional new tools and resources to be added to the iHUB, as well as supporting community meetings and workshops to further develop the community and refine the iHUB.

Professor Salt is committed to engagement with the public through informal science education. He has developed a 2,000 sq ft informal science exhibit on genomics called Genomics Explorer (http://www.genomicsexplorer.com/) which has been displayed at the Indiana State Fair, Owensboro Museum of Science and History, and the Danville Science Center.  This exhibit won Gold at the Critiques and Awards Program, Association for Communication Excellence, 2010. Professor Salt has also developed the award winning science-based interactive game the Genomics Digital Lab (http://www.aspb.org/education/GDLProject.CFM). This game has won first prize in 2008 in the Interactive Media Award, Science and Engineering Visualization Challenge, and at the World Summit Awards e-Science & Technology, 2009.

Professor Salt has developed a novel functional genomics approach to study the ionome, combining high-throughput elemental analysis with bioinformatics, genetics and genomics. Using this approach he has published a series of high impact papers (Rus et al. 2006, Baxter et al., 2008ab, Baxter et al., 2009, Morrissey et al., 2009, Atwell et al., 2010; Baxter et al., 2010) that not only provide new biological insight into the mechanisms regulating the plant ionome, but also validate this type of approach. Professor Salt’s research using this approach has also started to reveal the molecular basis of plant adaptation to the environment. For example, a recent publication by Professor Salt (Baxter et al., 2010) provides strong evidence that selection is acting on the Na-transporter HKT1 to adapt local populations of A. thaliana in Europe to saline environments, and this paper was described by one reviewer as “This paper should stand as an example to other researchers hoping to thoroughly describe mechanisms of adaptation.

GX figure

Fig 2. Genomics Explorer exhibit. (A) Overview of exhibit. (B) O2 interactive (C) Foreground Microscope, background DNA Dinner. (D) Walk Through Cell. (E) Genomics Digital Laboratory game. (F) Genomics Puzzle Pieces. (G) Visitor collecting one of the stamps to solve the “Genomics Puzzle”. For more details see http://www.genomicsexplorer.com/

Professor Salt has been a pioneer in using DNA microarrays to map the physical location of mutations. Two of Professor Salt’s papers were recently profiled in a review on root genomics by Benfey et al., (2010), highlighting the success of this approach. Professor Salt has also been an early pioneer in successfully applying genome-wide association analysis (GWA) to identify loci involved in regulating the ionome (Atwell et al., 2010; Baxter et al., 2010). Continuing to adopt new technologies to enhance his research approach, Professor Salt is currently applying short read resequencing technologies for the identification of causal DNA polymorphisms in A. thaliana ionomic mutants.

Professor Salt has also gone on to extend ionomics into yeast, completing a screen of all 12,000 strains in the full-genome knockout and overexpression collections. This unique data set is now being leveraged to better understand the regulation of the ionome in other species including A. thaliana and rice. Through collaborations Professor Salt is also extending the ionomics concept into C. elegans and mouse.

To encourage a diverse group of researchers to participate in ionomics, Professor Salt has developed a unique online web-based community portal called the ionomicsHUB (www.ionomicshub.org). The ionomicsHUB focuses on both workflow control for high-throughput data collection (Baxter et al., 2007), and delivery of ionomic data to the community. New funding is now allowing additional new tools and resources to be added to the iHUB (Fig 3), as well as supporting community meetings and workshops to further develop the community and refine the iHUB.

Current Research

Professor Salt has developed a novel functional genomics approach to study the ionome, combining high-throughput elemental analysis with bioinformatics, genetics and genomics. Using this approach he has published a series of high impact papers (e.g. Rus et al. 2006, Baxter et al., 2008ab, Baxter et al., 2009, Morrissey et al., 2009, Atwell et al., 2010; Baxter et al., 2010, Tian et al., 2010; Chao et al., 2011 & 2012; Borghi et al., 2011) that not only provide new biological insight into the mechanisms regulating the plant ionome, but also validate this type of approach. Professor Salt’s research using this approach has also started to reveal the molecular basis of plant adaptation to the environment. For example, a recent publication by Professor Salt (Baxter et al., 2010) provides strong evidence that selection is acting on the Na-transporter HKT1 to adapt local populations of A. thaliana in Europe to saline environments, and this paper was described by one reviewer as “This paper should stand as an example to other researchers hoping to thoroughly describe mechanisms of adaptation.

Professor Salt has been a pioneer in using DNA microarrays to map the physical location of mutations. Two of Professor Salt’s papers were recently profiled in a review on root genomics by Benfey et al., (2010), highlighting the success of this approach. Professor Salt has also been an early pioneer in successfully applying genome-wide association (GWA) mapping to identify loci involved in regulating the ionome (Atwell et al., 2010; Baxter et al., 2010; Chao et al., 2012). Continuing to adopt new technologies to enhance his research approach, Professor Salt is currently applying short read next generation resequencing technologies for the identification of causal DNA polymorphisms in A. thaliana ionomic mutants, and natural accessions of A. thaliana and rice.

Professor Salt has also been applying these ionomic techniques for the identification of genes that control the mineral nutrient and trace element content of rice grain. This approach entails measuring the rice grain ionome in over 1,700 natural accessions of rice grown in the field. From this information accessions have been selected to develop over 25 mapping populations which Professor Salt is now using to identify the genes that control the rice grain ionome.

Research Grants

FUNDED RESEARCH GRANTS

Ongoing Research projects

  • Elucidation of the mechanisms controlling heavy metal accumulation in rice based on ionomics and genomics approaches. National Science Foundation Council of China (NSFC) International Collaborative Project (PI Fangjie Zhou, Co-I David E Salt), 01/01/2016 – 31/12/2020, Nanjing Agricultural University ¥3,330,000.
  • ALERT 14: Empowering research with ultra-fast high-throughput genome sequencing on the benchtop. BBSRC (PI David E Salt, Co-I Elaina Collie-Duguid), 01/10/2014 – 30/09/2015, University of Aberdeen £529,609
  • Research Program (SRP) Sources and Protracted Effects of Early Life Exposure to Arsenic and Mercury. Project 1 Arsenic uptake, transport and storage in plants. US National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (PI Mary Lou Guerinot, Co-PI David E Salt), 01/04/2014 – 31/03/2019, University of Aberdeen £264,127.
  • Mapping radial ion-transport pathways in plant roots with cell-type specific resolution. The Leverhulme Trust (PI David E Salt), 01/08/2014 – 31/07/2017, University of Aberdeen £225,631.
  • ERA-CAPS: Plant root diffusional barriers: Genesis and implications for nutrient efficiency and stress tolerance. Total award €2,071,500 (PI David E Salt, Co-I Benni Franke, Nico von Wirén, Yann Boursiac, Mark Aarts, Jan K Schjoerring). BBSRC, 01/03/2014 – 28/02/2017, University of Aberdeen £485,024.
  • Genome-wide association mapping and landscape scale modelling of heritable ionomic diversity in Arabidopsis thaliana populations, BBSRC (PI David E Salt, CoPI's Pete Smith, Alex Douglas), 01/09/2013 – 31/08/2016, University of Aberdeen £751,233.
  • Ionome to Genome: Mapping the Gene Networks Controlling Nutrient Content in Rice grain, US National Science Foundation, Plant Genome Research Program, Total Award $6,873,734 (PI David E Salt, CoPI’s Mary Lou Guerinot, Shannon Pinson), 09/09/2007 – 07/31/2015, University of Aberdeen £270,989.
  • The genetic basis and adaptive significance of natural ionomic variation, FP7 Marie Curie Career Integration Grant (CIG) (PI David E Salt), 11/08/2011 – 10/08/2015, University of Aberdeen €100,000
  • The genetic basis of natural ionomic variation, US National Institutes of Health (PIs David E Salt and Mary Lou Guerinot), 04/01/2011 – 03/31/2015, University of Aberdeen £296,646.
  • The iHUB: A collaborative international network for ionomics, US National Science Foundation (PI David E Salt, CoPI Mourad Ouzzani), 06/01/2010 – 05/31/2015, Purdue University $527,339
  • US-Brazilian Rice Ionomics Collaborative (USBRIC), US National Science Foundation, Developing Country Collaborations in Plant Genome Research (DCC-PGR) (PI David E Salt), 08/01/2008 – 07/31/2015, Purdue University $95,500.

Completed Research Support

  • Tools to Facilitate Collaboration within the Virtual Ionomics Network at ionomicshub.org to Foster Ionomic Discovery, Purdue University Cyber Center (PI David E Salt, CoPI Ivan Baxter), 01/01/2009 – 12/31/2009, $49,000
  • Mechanisms underlying arsenic tolerance and hyperaccumulation in the fern Pteris vittata, US National Science Foundation (PI Jody Banks, CoPI David E Salt), 02/15/2009 – 01/31/2012, Purdue University $400,000.
  • Cyberinfrastructure to enabled plant adaptation research, NSF supported iPlant Collaborative (PI David E Salt), 01/01/2011 – 31/3/2012, Purdue University $68,005
  • The Genetic basis of natural ionomic variation, National Institutes of Health (PI David E Salt, CoPI Mary Lou Guerinot, Magnus Nordborg), 01/08/2010 – 12/31/2010, $135,175
  • Arsenic Uptake, Transport and Accumulation in Plants project #9, National Institutes of Health. This is a Program Project grant lead by PI Joshua Hamilton entitled “Toxic Metals in the Northeast: From Biological to Environmental Implications (Project #9 PI Mary Lou Guerinot, coPI David E Salt), 04/08 – 03/13, $208,690
  • The Genetic basis of natural ionomic variation, National Institutes of Health (PI David Salt, CoPI Mary Lou Guerinot, Magnus Nordborg), 03/31/2007 – 03/30/2010, $1,086,788
  • Acquisition of Metabolic Profiling Instrumentation at Purdue, National Science Foundation, MRI, (PI Clint Chapple, CoPI’s David Rhodes, David Salt, Barry Wanner), 10/01/04 - 09/30/07, Purdue award $839,427.
  • Tools for differential metabolomics, National Institute of Health Road Map, (PI Fred Regnier, CoPI’s Jiri Adamec, Graham Cook, Jo Davisson, John Morgan, Dan Raftery, David Salt, Barry Wanner), 10/01/04 - 09/30/07, Purdue award $4,719,117 (Salt budget $778,107).
  • Ionomics. National Science Foundation, 2010 Project, (Pi Guerinot M-L, CoPI’s Harper J, Salt DE Schroeder J, Ward J), 9/1/2004 to 8/31/2008, Purdue award $1,222,015 (total $3,490,000).
  • Molecular dissection of arsenic hyperaccumulation in the fern Pteris vittata US Department of Energy (PI Banks J, CoPI Salt DE), 9/01/2003 to 8/31/2006, $450,000
  • Center for Phytoremediation Research and Development. Fund for the 21st Century (CoPI  Kathy Banks) 07/01/2003 to 06/30/2007, $2,000,000.
  • Monitoring Phytoremediation Processes Using the Green Fluorescent Protein. Department of Energy, Small Business Technology Transfer Program, Phase II, 9/01/2002 to 8/31/2004, $500,000 Purdue award $350,000.
  • Characterization of potential cesium binding ligands in plant root exudates. Brookhaven National Laboratory, 01/01/2002 to 05/31/2002, $15,315
  • Monitoring Phytoremediation Processes Using the Green Fluorescent Protein. Department of Energy, Small Business Technology Transfer Program, Phase I, 9/01/2001 to 6/30/2002, $99,791.44, Purdue award $56,853.
  • Genome-wide hunt for metal hyperaccumulation genes. National Science Foundation, Integrative Plant Biology, 7/1/2001 to 6/30/2004, $450,000
  • Selenium enriched plant material for chemoprevention. National Institute of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer Institute, Small Business Technology Transfer Program, Phase II. 5/1/2001 to 5/2/2003, $399,273 Purdue $169,498
  • Molecular mechanisms of nickel hyperaccumulation in Thlaspi goesingense. National Science Foundation, Integrative Plant Biology, 6/01/2001 to 5/31/2004, $329,807
  • Gene discovery in aid of plant nutrition, human health and environmental remediation. National Science Foundation, Plant Functional Genomics (Pi Guerinot M-L, CoPI’s Schroeder J, Harper J, Eide D, Salt DE), 9/1/2000 to 8/31/2004, Purdue award $689,611 (total $4,414,644).
  • Selenium enriched plant material for chemoprevention, National Institute of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer Institute, Small Business Technology Transfer Program, Phase I. 1/1/99 to 12/31/2000, $100,000.
  • Molecular dissection of the cellular mechanisms involved in nickel hyperaccumulation in plants, US Department of Energy, 9/15/96 to 01/31/2000, $495,938.
  • Phytofiltration: A novel approach to water treatment using seedlings, US Department of Agriculture, 12/1/96 to 4/30/2000, $116,664.

FUNDED TEACHING GRANTS

Completed Grants

  • Genomics Revolution Uncloaked American Society of Plant Biologists, Education Foundation 08/01/2005, $30,000
  • Chemistry and genomics-driven drug discovery. The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences, 01/27/00, $25,199 (CoPI with Dr Paul Torrence and Dr Colleen Kelley).
  • A day in the life of a protein- The green fluoresecent protein as a laboratory teaching aid. National Science Foundation, Course, Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI), 09/01/99 to 08/31/2001, $91, 671 (NAU match of $94,524, providing a total of $186, 195).

Manipulating Casparian strips for improved water and mineral use efficiencies in crops is therefore now a real possibility

Teaching Responsibilities

Northern Arizona University

  • Introductory Chemistry (CHM 151)
  • Fundamental Biochemistry (CHM 360)
  • Biochemistry (CHM 460)
  • Fundamental Biochemistry Laboratory (CHM 360L)

Purdue University

  • Plant Physiology (HORT 301)
  • Planning and Presenting Horticulture Research (HORT 601)

University of Aberdeen

  • Biology for Undergraduates BI1006
  • Biological Topics in Plant and Soil Science BI25P2
  • Plant Environment Interactions PL3504

External Responsibilities

  • Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
  • Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry.
  • Member of The American Society of Plant Biologists.
  • Member of the US Department of Energy grants review panel.
  • Member of the US Environmental Protection Agency grants review panel.
  • Member of the United States Department of Agricutlure grants review panel.
  • Member of the US National Science Foundation grant review panel.
  • Editorial Board member, Metallomics 2008 – 2014.
  • Editorial Board member, Plant and Cell Physiology (PCP), 2011 - 2014.
  • Editorial Board member Molecular Plant, 2012 – present.
  • Editorial Board member, International Journal of Phytorememdiation, 2003 – 2009.
  • Editorial Board member, BMC Plant Biology, 2004 – 2007.
  • Monitoring Editor, Plant Physiology 2005 – 2011.
  • Associate Editor, Brazilian Journal of Plant Physiology, 2007 – present.
  • American Society of Plant Biologists Education Committee member 2003 – 2007.
  • American Society of Plant Biologists Committee on Public Affairs 2007 – 2009.
  • Organizer of iPlant Adapation workshop, 2008.
  • Chair Plant Science Opportunities Team, iPlant (http://www.iplantcollaborative.org/),  2009 – 2010.
  • Coorganizer iPlant 2010 Conference, Las Vegas, May 2010.
  • Organizer of New Phytologist sponsored workshop ‘Ecological and Evolutionary Genomics of Plant Adaptation’, Aberdeen, June 2012.
  • Member Faculty of 1000 editoral team, 2010 – present.
  • Elected member of GARNet a BBSRC sponsored network set up to support Arabidopsis and the wider plant community (http://www.garnetcommunity.org.uk/), 2012 – present.
  • Chair GARNet steering committee.
  • Member of the Royal Society’s Research Grant Scheme Panel (Biological Sciences) Jan 2014 – Dec 2016.

Admin Responsibilities

Co-Director of the University of Aberdeen Centre for Genome Enabled Biology and Medicine

Publication statistics

  • Total peer reviewed publications: 121 (Web of Science)
  • Sum of the times each article has been cited without self-citation: 9,694 (Web of Science)
  • Average Citation of each article: 83 (Web of Science)
  • H-index: 50 (Web of Science)

Publications 

update | about Staff Pages

back