Folio 75r

Devotions to the cross and passion of Jesus Christ, continued.

Hymn, Salve vulnus dextre manus, continued



The author venerates the wound and asks that he may never be wanting among the number of the contrite.


Burnet Psalter image.  Aberdeen University Library 1998.

Te honoro te adoro,
te inquiro te imploro,
ut\ miser et moriens,

Ut in contritorum choro,
in quo\ sperando laboro,
numquam sim deficiens.

To the wound in the left hand.

Ad vul\nus sinistre manus.\

Hymn, Ave tu sinistra Christi.



The author invokes the right hand, pierced by the sharpest of nails. From it blood flows like the river Gyon, washing away our worst sins. We venerate this sweetest of springs with bowed head, asking that through it we may vanquish our enemies and rejoice at the last day.


Ave tu sinistra Christi,
perforata que fu\isti,
clavo perdurissimo.

Velut Gyon\ effudisti,
rivum tuum quo lavisti,
nos a malo\ pessimo.

Te o vulnus adoramus,
tibi caput\ inclinamus,
ut fonti dulcissimo.

Per te detur ut\ vincamus,
hostes ut et gaudeamus,
in die no\vissimo.

To the wound in Christ's side.

Ad vulnus lateris Christi.\


Hymn, O fons aque paradysi.



The author invokes the wound in Christ's side. From it four streams flow, striking unseen demons, causing them to quake. No spring filled a cup with such nectar. It is a remedy for all against the fatal poison of sin.


O fons aque paradysi,
a quo quatu\or divisi,
dulces fluunt rivuli,

Per\ quem demones invisi,
sunt confracti et elysi,
et\ effecti tremuli.

Dulce vulnus laterale,
inter fon\tes nullum tale,
nectar inquam poculi.

Ave salve\ gaude vale,
contra venenum letale,
medicina po\puli.

To the wound in the right foot.

Ad vulnus dextri pedis.\

Hymn, Ave vulnus dextri pedis.



The author invokes the wound in the right foot. It gives forth a river of blood, which can be compared with the river Tigris.


Ave vulnus dextri pedis,
tu cruoris\ rivum edis,
Tygri comparabilis.

Per hunc rivum homo redis,
ad superne cul-\



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