Lecture Programme

The Lecture Programme 2016-17

THURSDAYS at 7.30 pm in the Biological and Environmental Sciences Building 

Zoology Lecture Theatre, Biological and Environmental Sciences Building (previously Zoology Building), Tillydrone Avenue ABERDEEN AB24 2TZ map  Everyone welcome!  FREE to Friends of the Cruickshank Botanic Garden. Non-members -donation at the door.  Refreshments available in the foyer after the lecture at approximately 9pm.

The Lecture Programme is compiled by Clare and Ian Alexander.  Save your Thursday evening on the second Thursday of the month from October to May for informed, colourful and inspiring talks!


Listen to Martin Barker's lecture on "The Science of Colour in the Garden" given to the Friends in January 2016.


13 October 2016

THE BEAUTY OF SCOTTISH BRYOPHYTES

David Genney, Scottish Natural Heritage

Dave will give us a photographic tour of the mosses and liverworts he works to protect as Scottish Natural Heritage's bryophyte adviser. We will hear about some of the most important habitats and some current conservation issues, but most of all Dave hopes you'll gain a greater appreciation of the beauty and international significance of these small and often overlooked native plants. Poster


10 November 2016

THE STORY OF SCOTTISH BAMBOO

Kerri Dall, Scottish Bamboo Nursery, Turriff (www.scottishbamboo.com)

Kerri is very passionate about bamboo. She talks about their hardiness and garden potential, and gives us an insight into how Scottish Bamboo began and the challenges of running a mail order plant business in NE Scotland. Download a poster.


08 December 2016

INTERACTIONS OF BOTANIC GARDENS AND WILD VEGETATION COMMUNITIES: RISKS, REWARDS AND OPPORTUNITIES

David Burslem, Keeper, Cruickshank Botanic Garden

The Keeper of The Garden gives a personal perspective on the Botanic Gardens where he has had research connections, and considers how they have supported and informed his work on tropical forest ecology and conservation


12 January 2017

GLOBALISATION AND THE THREAT FROM INVASIVE PATHOGENS

Steve Woodward, Institute of Biological & Environmental Sciences

Our forests and gardens face unprecedented challenges from increasing numbers of invasive pests and pathogens arriving in the UK. Climate change predictions suggest that many additional pests and pathogens will become problems as temperatures increase and rainfall patterns change. Using examples from Europe and elsewhere, Steve illustrates the potential for alien pathogens to cause damage, reducing biodiversity and altering gardens and native ecosystems beyond recognition.


09 February 2017

EARTHWORMS IN GARDENS AND BEYOND

Kevin Butt, University of Central Lancashire.

Kevin explores the diversity of British earthworm species, their life histories, requirements and behaviours. He presents material from research projects investigating their actions as ecosystem service providers. Without the presence of earthworms - a group sometimes referred to as “Darwin’s plough” - our world would be extremely different.


09 March 2017

PETTICOATS AND PLANTS: THE UNTOLD STORY OF SCOTLAND'S GARDENING WOMEN

Deborah Reid, Garden Historian

Scottish women gardeners have largely been omitted from garden history. Deborah looks at the contribution of nineteenth century Scottish gardening women who went beyond their garden gates and achieved within the wider public sphere of horticulture in Scotland.


13 April 2017

DESIGNS ON THE LANDSCAPE: RESEARCHING SCOTLAND'S GARDENS.

Marilyn Brown, Garden Archaeologist

Marilyn introduces historic gardens and designed landscapes in Scotland from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance with a discussion of their importance and the type of information that can be discovered about them through survey and documentary research.  The lecture will include examples from monastic sites, palaces and the houses of the magnates as well as town gardens with particular reference to the gardens of the north-east of Scotland.


11 May 2017

The Noel Pritchard Memorial Lecture

THE ROMANTIC HERITAGE OF SCOTS ROSES

Peter Boyd, Shrewsbury (www.peterboyd.com)

The first 'coloured' variant of the native Rosa spinosissima was found in Scotland in the 17th century. By the early 19th century, hundreds of single, semi-double and double 'Scots Roses' had been raised in a wide range of colours. These charming roses became particularly popular in Britain and Nordic countries but went out of fashion by about 1840. However, iconic Scots Roses were carried across the world by Scottish and Nordic immigrants to North America, Australia, New Zealand and elsewhere. Their international heritage is now being re-discovered, but surviving old Scots Rose cultivars, and the habitats of wild Rosa spinosissima are under threat.