The Aberdeen Bestiary

Folio 100v - Of stones and what they can do, continued.


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Commentary, Translation and Transcription

These sections are located below the image on each page, scroll down page and click on the tabs to view them. It is also possible to view the translation alongside the image by clicking the translation icon in the toolbar

It is not part of the project to provide a definitive edition of the text of the Bestiary, but to help readers by providing a transcription and translation of the text. Currently the following editorial conventions obtain:

Text

  1. The original capitalisation is retained, but capitals have been added for personal and place names, excluding deus and diabolus.
  2. The original punctuation, including a point and inverted semi-colon (both serving as commas), and a point (serving as a full stop), is represented by comma, full stop and question-mark; a colon has been inserted before quotations.
  3. Suggested readings are in [ ].
  4. Variants from other Bestiary texts (eg Ashmole 1511 and Patrologia Latina 176) are added where they indicate a corruption, elucidate a meaning and replace excised text. They are represented as [A: PL:]

Translation

  1. Direct quotations from the Bible, where identified, are cited from the Authorised Version in ( ).
  2. Paraphrased quotations are identified where possible and indicated as: (see Job, 18:22).
  3. Suggested translations of corrupt words are in [ ].
  4. Capitalisation is sparing; additional punctuation has been used where necessary to give the sense. Paragraphs have been created to break up the text.
preserves love. 4 The sapphire restrains the flow of and blood and kills le felun. 5 Topaz is saffron coloured, like amber, but more pleasing and it prevents a pot from boiling over; placed in the mouth of a thirsting man it removes his thirst. 6 Turquoise brings anger and boldness. 7 Sardonyx is tri-coloured; it gives you boldness and brings victory. 8 The toadstone brings you victory in achieving your ends and in war. 9 The amethyst brings an omen of wood and water; it is better given than desired. 10 Jasper is green like the the smaragdus but not so pleasing; it restrains the flow of blood and preserves the love of the person who gives or receives it. 11 Carnelian is red and restrains the flow of blood. 12 The pearl, parlus, is white and round and disposes you to sleep. 13 The stone decapun is of the same colour; it seems to be marked with blood and brings victory in every field. 14 Crystal when ground and drunk in water restores milk to a woman who has lost it. Note that hot goat's blood dissolves a diamond. The pearl, margarita, is a small stone but a precious one; it is white, compact, found in shellfish and conceived by heavenly dew, as Isidore says. 16 Note that the pearl conceived from the morning dew is whiter and of better quality than that from the evening dew. Sometimes, however, margarita is a general word for a precious stone. However the word is to be understood, it is certain that the twelve 'pearls', interpreted in the moral sense, are the twelve virtues, symbolised by twelve stones as you will more plainly see. The diamond, adamas or dyamas, is a transparent stone, like crystal, but

Text

The properties of various gems.

Transcription

morem servat.'4 Saphirus inhibet sanguinem, et\ occidit le felun. 5 Topacius, est croceus, sicut lambrum\ sed magis iocundus, et prohibet ebullicionem olle et po\situs ad os scicientis, aufert sitim.6 Turgesius, por\tat iram et audaciam. 7 Mardonicus [Sardonicus], est tricolor dat au\daciam, et portat victoriam. 8 Crapodinus por\tat victoriam in placito et bello. Amatistus portat\ omen bosci et fluvii, et vult dari, non desideratus.\ [10] Jaspis est viridis sicut smaragdus, sed non ita iocundus\ et inhibet sanguinem et conservat amorem, dantis\ et accipientis. 11 Cornelius est rubicundus et inhibet\ sanguinem. Parlus, est albus et rotundus et\ dat affectum dormiendi. 12 Lapis decapun, est\ eiusdem coloris, et videtur guttatus sanguine, et portat victo\riam in omni area. 13 Cristallus molitus et bibi\tus aqua reddit lac mulieri, que illud amisit. Nota\ quod sanguis hirsinus calidus destruit dyamantem.\ 14 Margarita lapis parvus est, sed preciosus, candi\ dus, solidus, in conchis marinis natus, de rore celes\ to conceptus ut dicit Ysidorus. 16 Et nota qui de\ rore matutino concipitur, candidior est, et melior quam\ qui de rore vespertino. Aliquando tamen margarita nomen est\ generale lapis preciosi. Sed quocumque modo margari\ta accipiatur, certum est quod duodecim margarite secundum\ sensum moralem sunt duodecim virtutes, per duode\cim lapides designate sicut planius invenietis.\ Adamas sive dyamas clarus lapis ut cristallus, set\

Translation

preserves love. 4 The sapphire restrains the flow of and blood and kills le felun. 5 Topaz is saffron coloured, like amber, but more pleasing and it prevents a pot from boiling over; placed in the mouth of a thirsting man it removes his thirst. 6 Turquoise brings anger and boldness. 7 Sardonyx is tri-coloured; it gives you boldness and brings victory. 8 The toadstone brings you victory in achieving your ends and in war. 9 The amethyst brings an omen of wood and water; it is better given than desired. 10 Jasper is green like the the smaragdus but not so pleasing; it restrains the flow of blood and preserves the love of the person who gives or receives it. 11 Carnelian is red and restrains the flow of blood. 12 The pearl, parlus, is white and round and disposes you to sleep. 13 The stone decapun is of the same colour; it seems to be marked with blood and brings victory in every field. 14 Crystal when ground and drunk in water restores milk to a woman who has lost it. Note that hot goat's blood dissolves a diamond. The pearl, margarita, is a small stone but a precious one; it is white, compact, found in shellfish and conceived by heavenly dew, as Isidore says. 16 Note that the pearl conceived from the morning dew is whiter and of better quality than that from the evening dew. Sometimes, however, margarita is a general word for a precious stone. However the word is to be understood, it is certain that the twelve 'pearls', interpreted in the moral sense, are the twelve virtues, symbolised by twelve stones as you will more plainly see. The diamond, adamas or dyamas, is a transparent stone, like crystal, but
  • Commentary

    Text

    The properties of various gems.

  • Translation
    preserves love. 4 The sapphire restrains the flow of and blood and kills le felun. 5 Topaz is saffron coloured, like amber, but more pleasing and it prevents a pot from boiling over; placed in the mouth of a thirsting man it removes his thirst. 6 Turquoise brings anger and boldness. 7 Sardonyx is tri-coloured; it gives you boldness and brings victory. 8 The toadstone brings you victory in achieving your ends and in war. 9 The amethyst brings an omen of wood and water; it is better given than desired. 10 Jasper is green like the the smaragdus but not so pleasing; it restrains the flow of blood and preserves the love of the person who gives or receives it. 11 Carnelian is red and restrains the flow of blood. 12 The pearl, parlus, is white and round and disposes you to sleep. 13 The stone decapun is of the same colour; it seems to be marked with blood and brings victory in every field. 14 Crystal when ground and drunk in water restores milk to a woman who has lost it. Note that hot goat's blood dissolves a diamond. The pearl, margarita, is a small stone but a precious one; it is white, compact, found in shellfish and conceived by heavenly dew, as Isidore says. 16 Note that the pearl conceived from the morning dew is whiter and of better quality than that from the evening dew. Sometimes, however, margarita is a general word for a precious stone. However the word is to be understood, it is certain that the twelve 'pearls', interpreted in the moral sense, are the twelve virtues, symbolised by twelve stones as you will more plainly see. The diamond, adamas or dyamas, is a transparent stone, like crystal, but
  • Transcription
    morem servat.'4 Saphirus inhibet sanguinem, et\ occidit le felun. 5 Topacius, est croceus, sicut lambrum\ sed magis iocundus, et prohibet ebullicionem olle et po\situs ad os scicientis, aufert sitim.6 Turgesius, por\tat iram et audaciam. 7 Mardonicus [Sardonicus], est tricolor dat au\daciam, et portat victoriam. 8 Crapodinus por\tat victoriam in placito et bello. Amatistus portat\ omen bosci et fluvii, et vult dari, non desideratus.\ [10] Jaspis est viridis sicut smaragdus, sed non ita iocundus\ et inhibet sanguinem et conservat amorem, dantis\ et accipientis. 11 Cornelius est rubicundus et inhibet\ sanguinem. Parlus, est albus et rotundus et\ dat affectum dormiendi. 12 Lapis decapun, est\ eiusdem coloris, et videtur guttatus sanguine, et portat victo\riam in omni area. 13 Cristallus molitus et bibi\tus aqua reddit lac mulieri, que illud amisit. Nota\ quod sanguis hirsinus calidus destruit dyamantem.\ 14 Margarita lapis parvus est, sed preciosus, candi\ dus, solidus, in conchis marinis natus, de rore celes\ to conceptus ut dicit Ysidorus. 16 Et nota qui de\ rore matutino concipitur, candidior est, et melior quam\ qui de rore vespertino. Aliquando tamen margarita nomen est\ generale lapis preciosi. Sed quocumque modo margari\ta accipiatur, certum est quod duodecim margarite secundum\ sensum moralem sunt duodecim virtutes, per duode\cim lapides designate sicut planius invenietis.\ Adamas sive dyamas clarus lapis ut cristallus, set\
Folio 100v - Of stones and what they can do, continued. | The Aberdeen Bestiary | The University of Aberdeen